Your Boss is Watching Your Emails!!

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by softwareengineer2006, May 7, 2006.

  1. Your Boss is Watching Your Emails!!
    Find out why and how you should encrypt your confidential emails before
    sending
    in my website
    http://tinyurl.com/z4u8m
     
    softwareengineer2006, May 7, 2006
    #1
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  2. softwareengineer2006

    Ponder Guest

    Hiya .

    Not mine.
     
    Ponder, May 7, 2006
    #2
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  3. softwareengineer2006

    steve Guest

    I agree, my boss watches my emails but I am my boss!
     
    steve, May 7, 2006
    #3
  4. softwareengineer2006

    John Holmes Guest

    blabbered in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:
    If you aren't an idiot, you made a world-class effort at simulating one.
    Try to edit your writing of unnecessary material before attempting to
    impress us with your insight. The evidence that you are a nincompoop will
    still be available to readers, but they will be able to access it more
    rapidly.
     
    John Holmes, May 7, 2006
    #4
  5. Sure, why not? He owns the computer, and your time while you are there.
    ...which is:
    http://www.geocities.com/testyoursoftware/email-encryption.htm

    Note the many people are reluctant to click on tinyurl links because you
    never know where you go.

    Aside: if your boss found you encrypting your email, do you think he
    would have grounds for termination? Or at the least, a visit to his
    office?
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, May 7, 2006
    #5
  6. softwareengineer2006

    Leythos Guest

    And if you are sending email not related to your workplace, while at
    work, you could be disciplined up-to, and including, Discharge, in many
    cases.

    The company you work for has complete ownership of the network, data,
    services, and anything you send across it - so you have NO EXPECTATION
    OF PRIVACY AT WORK.

    We've just fired 4 people at one company for violating the company
    Network AUP, and they were warned twice.

    If you're at work, then work, don't do personal crap at work.
     
    Leythos, May 7, 2006
    #6
  7. softwareengineer2006

    Jimchip Guest

    Each organization has it's own policies that are important to be aware of.
    One common approach is that some non-work related web sites and emails can
    be accessed during "break" hours but not during working periods. No one
    should assume anything about an employer's policies: The policy should be
    avaiable in writing and all parties should acknowlege it.
    That might be something that can be assumed :) It is usually in the policy
    so that newbies are made aware of that fact.
    Yup. The AUP protects the employer and the users. Violation after a warning
    is just stupid.
    It depends on the AUP.
     
    Jimchip, May 7, 2006
    #7
  8. softwareengineer2006

    NotMe Guest

    | Your Boss is Watching Your Emails!!
    | Find out why and how you should encrypt your confidential emails before
    | sending
    | in my website
    | http://tinyurl.com/z4u8m

    Ture but she lets me sleep with her (and has even before there were emails)
     
    NotMe, May 8, 2006
    #8
  9. softwareengineer2006

    NotMe Guest

    | In article <>,
    | says...
    | > Your Boss is Watching Your Emails!!
    | > Find out why and how you should encrypt your confidential emails before
    | > sending
    |
    | And if you are sending email not related to your workplace, while at
    | work, you could be disciplined up-to, and including, Discharge, in many
    | cases.
    |
    | The company you work for has complete ownership of the network, data,
    | services, and anything you send across it - so you have NO EXPECTATION
    | OF PRIVACY AT WORK.
    |
    | We've just fired 4 people at one company for violating the company
    | Network AUP, and they were warned twice.
    |
    | If you're at work, then work, don't do personal crap at work.

    Under those rules one should not be expected (read required) to do work
    outside the office as well?
     
    NotMe, May 8, 2006
    #9
  10. softwareengineer2006

    Mara Guest

    How are you required to do company work *on your own time?*

    I *could.* I won't. My off hours belong to *me.* But while I'm at work, my time
    belongs to the company - and it's my job to catch people doing this sort of
    thing. That applies whenever I'm *on the clock,* even if I'm not in the building
    (i.e., meetings, offsite jobs, etc..)

    Corporate computers are not public or private ones. And the reverse is also
    true. There are certain laws we have to follow at work. Those laws do not apply
    when I'm off the clock and using my own computers at home. If your corporate
    policy does, you're in the wrong job.
     
    Mara, May 8, 2006
    #10
  11. softwareengineer2006

    Seatoller Guest

    That is NOT what your wife told me! *grin*
     
    Seatoller, May 8, 2006
    #11
  12. softwareengineer2006

    Leythos Guest

    it's completely up to you as to where you work. If your job requires
    that you work outside your home, and that you utilize company networks
    while doing it, then you have no reason to expect any privacy while
    using the company network.

    It's real easy to understand, when you are working, you are working,
    when they pay you to work, you are not suppose to be screwing around on
    personal things. If you use company resources you have no right to
    expect privacy in their use - and that includes you using a company
    laptop off-hours at your home - you have no reason to expect that they
    don't monitor by some means the information on your laptop.

    If you want to have privacy, if you really think that's possible, then
    don't do personal things on company resources.
     
    Leythos, May 8, 2006
    #12
  13. softwareengineer2006

    Mikey Guest

    My boss watches me shower, but since she looks like Jessica Simpson I don't
    mind.
     
    Mikey, May 8, 2006
    #13
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