Word to the wise!

Discussion in 'MCAD' started by Sean, Jan 7, 2005.

  1. Sean

    Sean Guest

    I had to learn the hard way....

    Rush out and get yourself a book with MCAD/MCSD on it with questions in the
    back and you think that is all you need to study..do well in school, pretty
    sharp think you can knock this out....be careful.

    The questions in the books are very hard and sometimes cover things not in
    the book. The CD's in the books cover other questions not in the book and are
    equally as hard. You end up thinking its just the publishers questions only
    to find out that the exam is formated just as the questions in the book are.
    So you run out and get 3 books that cover .net topics you need to know in
    general and then take yet another mock up exams only to find they asked you
    questions from mars so you go research it only to find the questions are
    correct.

    In short, these exams are a B*TCH! Had I known I wouldnt have even started
    but now I feel like its a waste to not at the very least pass one exam
     
    Sean, Jan 7, 2005
    #1
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  2. Sean

    SagaBoi17 Guest

    So what books/ authors would you recommend to help pass the exam?
     
    SagaBoi17, Jan 7, 2005
    #2
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  3. Sean

    Sean Guest

    All of them....

    start with buying ALL the cert books that say MCAD/MCSD in the title with
    the test number you are studying, that is a good start.
     
    Sean, Jan 7, 2005
    #3
  4. Sean

    - - Guest

    So is it worth taking after all?
     
    - -, Jan 9, 2005
    #4
  5. Sean

    Sean Guest

    I havent passed one exam yet. I tried for 70-306 and got 511, need 700 to
    pass. I am having serious second thoughts I even started this madness to be
    honest. But I can say for sure if its good or not in the work world. I do
    know that the average pay for MCSD is very high, like 85k and 55k to start
    but in all honesty I am not doing it for the money but its the only
    information I have about the industry at this point
     
    Sean, Jan 9, 2005
    #5
  6. Honestly folks, there is not a book you can buy that will replace
    experience.

    The exams all state that they are targeted at folks with real experience.
    What if you don't have it? then do your best to come up with some
    application ideas, call a local charity and build a new business system for
    them.... Most of all, play, explore, learn.


    --
    Rob Labbé, MCP, MCAD, MCSD, MCT
    Lead Architect/Trainer
    Fidelis

    Blog: http://spaces.msn.com/members/roblabbe
     
    Rob Labbe \(Lowney\), Jan 10, 2005
    #6
  7. Sean

    Sean Guest

    I agree to a point. I am currently making an application for myself so that I
    will have hands on experience and its helping me understand greatly what I
    have been reading HOWEVER....in most cases I would have no clue what to look
    for, what I could do etc without reading the books. That said, I wish I just
    got behind the machine a little sooner.

    And now that I got drag and drop to work and connected to an excel file with
    a query..its break time!
     
    Sean, Jan 10, 2005
    #7
  8. A tip,

    While you're playing with the product, try to avoid a lot of the drag and
    drop features and do it the manual (long, hard) way. Use the SDK
    documentation, really understand what the namespaces are in the framework
    and how they are to be used.

    You'll notice there are often several ways to do the same thing. Each with
    its own time and place. Get to know when to use each and more importantly
    why.

    The trick to passing these exams is NOT memorization. Unless you're way
    smarter than me (a distinct possibility) you'll never remember all the
    information you need. However, if you understand the underling concepts
    (really understand them) you'll always be able to figure out the correct
    answers yourself.

    The prep books generally do a great job of presenting the facts to memorize,
    but don't do so well at explaining the underlying concepts. That is why the
    questions seem so tough, they don't match the facts in the book exactly, and
    the book hasn't presented the underlying concepts for you to be able to come
    up with the answer yourself.

    It is very possible to get ready for these exams based on experience with
    the product, the tool, and the SDK documentation. (I wrote the exams while
    they were in beta, that's all that was available to me at the time)

    Regards,


    --
    Rob Labbé, MCP, MCAD, MCSD, MCT
    Lead Architect/Trainer
    Fidelis

    Blog: http://spaces.msn.com/members/roblabbe
     
    Rob Labbe \(Lowney\), Jan 10, 2005
    #8
  9. Sean

    Sean Guest

    well first off I didnt even know they had componets for drag and drop. I
    didnt know there was any other way to do it other then by code.
    second off, if I had not read these books I would have zero idea what may or
    may not be on the exam..;)
     
    Sean, Jan 10, 2005
    #9
  10. Sean

    Friend Guest

    Rob seems a tad pretentious. Notice how he lists redundant certificates after
    his name (eg. MCP followed by MCAD, when the latter implies the former ;) )?

    As someone with two B.S. and an M.S., I don't consider these corporate certs
    anything worth putting after my name. A Bachelor's degree - or even an
    Associates degree - is regarded much higher than any corporate cert.
    Nevertheless, they can get you a job if you're lucky, and if you have no
    other credentials, there is no reaosn not to continue after these easy ones.

    Listen, Sean - why not just visit TestKing.com?

    Rob said:
    The prep books generally do a great job of presenting the facts to memorize,
    but don't do so well at explaining the underlying concepts. That is why the
    questions seem so tough, they don't match the facts in the book exactly, and
    the book hasn't presented the underlying concepts for you to be able to come
    up with the answer yourself."

    In other words the books are essentially lame brain dumps (or so it seems
    Rob is saying). So long as you're using braindumps, you might as well get
    good ones from TestKing. Rob says "it's not about memorization". But we all
    knoiw it's ALL ABOUT MEMORIZATION.

    Two words, my friend - TEST KING. ;)

    Ron says that the tests are not about memorization. He's all wrong - it's
    all about memorization.
     
    Friend, Jan 27, 2005
    #10
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