Wireless router suggestions for a big house?

Discussion in 'Network Routers' started by Ant, Aug 25, 2012.

  1. Ant

    Ant Guest

    Ah cool. I forgot to mention that I updated
    http://zimage.com/~ant/MiCasa2/88ftLongestDistanceFromACableModemRoom.jpg in
    my newsgroup thread. I find it interesting that the kitchen (2-4 bars)
    wasn't bad as going down to the living/den/family room (1-2 bars; 0-2
    bars behind the bar counter).

    So, they can use a wireless repeater (no network cable hookups) with an
    old Linksys WRT54GL (or any) router? If so, then would Linksys/Cisco
    Wireless-N Range Extender/Bridge RE1000 work well for this situation?

    How about a newer stronger wireless router like a NETGEAR Wireless
    Router - AC 1750 Dual Band Gigabit (R6300)?

    Yeah, well they're OK without this giga speed. Just as long as it is
    fast for streaming HD videos on their HDTV in that far away weak room. I
    thought "N" wireless would have gigaspeed even if signals are strong.

    Yeah, that I noticed. Lots of lags in the very weak room/area.
    --
    "Remember, ants are only waiting for you to die..." --unknown
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    Ant, Aug 27, 2012
    #21
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  2. Ant

    dg1261 Guest

    "Work well" is relative. A wireless repeater (or "range extender"--same
    thing) will give you better coverage in the weak part of the house so you
    can at least maintain a consistent connection, but will it be fast
    enough? That depends on what you want to do with it. It should be fast
    enough for websurfing and youtube, local lan file transfers will be
    leisurely (though adequate if it's only occasional), but I wouldn't count
    on it being fast enough for HD streaming.

    I'm not a networking expert, but my understanding is bandwidth through a
    repeater gets essentially cut in half because the repeater has to both
    send and receive the same signal to relay it between the router and
    client device. If you're starting with 56 Mbps max and it gets stepped
    down for signal level and then gets cut in half by repeating ... well,
    that probably won't do for HD streaming.

    802.11n equipment should do better, but I wouldn't hazard a guess how
    much better. IMHE, it's often a bit better than 802.11g but not an order
    of magnitude better.

    You might try a hybrid approach: wifi for laptops and mobile devices, and
    HomePlug for the TV. I assume the router room and living room are on the
    same circuit, so you could plug a powerline adapter into a wall socket
    near the router, connect it to a wired lan port on the router with an
    ethernet cable, plug another adapter into the wall near the TV, with
    another ethernet cable from it to the TV. For best results, use 200Mbps
    AV adapters, not the slower 85Mbps devices, and plug the HomePlug
    adapters into the wall, not on extension cords or surge strips. This
    should give the TV the best throughput you can get short of a direct
    CAT5/6 ethernet connection.

    And if you decide to go HomePlug for the TV, I'd add one more adapter and
    replace the repeater with a regular wireless access point. Position the
    HomePlug and AP where the repeater would be, and this should give you a
    faster connection for wifi devices. (Note: you only need one HomePlug at
    the router, so three adapters in total.)
     
    dg1261, Aug 27, 2012
    #22
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  3. Ant

    Ant Guest

    Neither am I. I just know the basics. Hence, why I posted in here and
    other forums for suggestions on the situation. Repeaters slow speeds
    down? That sucks. :( I can tell you that cable modem is only 10 Mb/sec
    for download. Obviously, LAN speed's performance will be affected.

    I will try a NETGEAR Wireless Router - AC 1750 Dual Band Gigabit (R6300)
    from a local returnable store, and see how it is. Same for a
    Extender/Bridge:

    1. Linksys/Cisco Wireless-N Range Extender/Bridge RE1000
    2. NETGEAR WN2500RP Universal Dual Band WiFi Range Extender

    I will probably will get both Netgears with its extender anyways.

    So, I will have to check the power breaker to see if they are on the
    same circuit?

    OK. Wow, this is complex. :)
    --
    "Thanks for giving me the courage to eat all those ants." --unknown
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    Ant, Aug 27, 2012
    #23
  4. Ant

    Ant Guest

    In another newgroup thread reply, someone suggested a reflector like
    http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/antennas/Misc/slides/lantern-reflector.html
    for the router's antenna(e/s). Would this be a good idea?

    Thank you in advance. :)


    --
    "... The press can hold its magnifying glass up to our problems,
    bringing them into focus, illuminating issues heretofore unseen. Or they
    can use that magnifying glass to light ants on fire, and then perhaps
    host a week of shows on the sudden, unexpected, dangerous flaming ant
    epidemic. If we amplify everything, we hear nothing..." --Jon Stewart
    from Rally to Restore Sanity on 10/30/2010.
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    Ant, Aug 27, 2012
    #24
  5. Ant

    Char Jackson Guest

    802.11g has a max connection rate of 54Mbps, and at that connection
    rate the max throughput is a little less than half, or about 25Mbps.
    By definition, a repeater cuts the max throughput in half again, minus
    another chunk for overhead, so under the best conditions you're down
    to about 10Mbps. You can't count on the best conditions, however, so
    as the first segment adapts to noise and interference by stepping its
    rate down, so in turn does the repeater get affected in the same way.
    The second segment of the wireless link, the repeated segment, can
    easily drop to near zero under an awful lot of real world conditions,
    which is why repeaters (range extenders) are only tried as a last
    resort and have such a bad reputation.

    A repeated signal can work for web browsing and email, as examples of
    applications where delays and even stalls can be mostly tolerated, but
    I would never try to deploy a repeater for HDTV streaming, for
    example. On its best day, 802.11g is barely adequate for HD streaming.
    Add a repeater to the mix and it's almost guaranteed not to work.
     
    Char Jackson, Aug 27, 2012
    #25
  6. Ant

    Ant Guest

    I'm not a networking expert, but my understanding is bandwidth through a
    If I were to get N and wireless devices have N support, I would have
    faster speeds. However, I was told that signal distances are less than
    "g". Am I understanding that correctly?
    --
    Quote of the Week: "When the water rises the fish eat the ants, when the water falls the ants eat the fish." --Thai Proverb
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    Ant, Aug 28, 2012
    #26
  7. Ant

    Char Jackson Guest

    That's my understanding, yes. 802.11n provides faster speeds at the
    expense of shorter range. I would expect exceptions here and there,
    but overall that's how I expect it to work.
     
    Char Jackson, Aug 28, 2012
    #27
  8. Ant

    Ant Guest

    I wonder if using the extender would give more speed for "N" compared to
    "G".
    --
    "Look at them, fighting like ants. The fate's waiting them." --Kane in
    Command & Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars
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    Ant, Aug 28, 2012
    #28
  9. Ant

    Char Jackson Guest

    Personally, I wouldn't give serious thought to any solution that
    involves a repeater. You have so many other options, and all of them
    are better.
     
    Char Jackson, Aug 28, 2012
    #29
  10. Ant

    Ant Guest

    I finally have it up with its latest firmware in the same
    location/place. Surprisingly, it worked better than my old Linksys
    WRT54GL router's wireless even in the far away lowerlevel
    family/living/den room. It's not perfect, but it worked and speeds were
    decent. A few packet losses here and there, but not bad like the old
    router. Even watching a 720p YouTube video seems to do well. I even
    tried closing doors to see if they affect the wireless signals. Still
    good!

    However, it has to be on 2.4 Ghz and not 5 Ghz (didn't know you can have
    both running at the same time -- now I know why it is called dual band).
    5 Ghz wasn't strong enough for closer distance rooms too (worse than
    Linksys WRT54 GL's!).

    It doesn't look like the unopened Netgear's universal dual band wifi
    range extender 4-port wifi adapter is needed now (will return it near
    its 30 days return).

    Also, nice GUI. All fancy now. Lots of features (no time to try them
    too). I wonder how Linksys' newer routers are now. I used to use Netgear
    RT311 that didn't have many features. I used use its telnet (preferred
    over web GUI).
    --
    Quote of the Week: "When the water rises the fish eat the ants, when the water falls the ants eat the fish." --Thai Proverb
    /\___/\ Ant(Dude) @ http://antfarm.home.dhs.org (Personal Web Site)
    / /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
    | |o o| |
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    Ant, Aug 31, 2012
    #30
  11. Per Char Jackson:
    Consumed by a fit of curiosity - and about to enter a hospital for a
    prolonged stay - I bought a repeater with the notion of using it in the
    hospital to spoof another device and watch recorded movies at home.

    I'm really glad it didn't cost much.... beeeeeg mistake. On this one,
    at least, the throughput was just pitiful.
     
    (PeteCresswell), Nov 4, 2013
    #31
  12. Ant

    Char Jackson Guest

    I hope you're out of the hospital and fully recovered. Forget about the
    repeater and put it behind you. :)
     
    Char Jackson, Nov 4, 2013
    #32
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