Wireless connection keeps dropping off

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Guest, Nov 30, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Have a laptop with a centrino processor, after it connects with the router at
    home it drops the connection in a minute and shows a red X on the wireless
    network connection. There are 2 other desktops on the same router and the
    motorola 220 router shows 5 bars on the wireless network connection, but does
    not connect again. When I am on the road it works fine at a hotel. Could you
    please help me.
     
    Guest, Nov 30, 2005
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Ryan Younger Guest

    You don't say if you are using authentication. If you are using WPA this is
    a symptom that has been experienced by others and there is a registry edit
    on my blog. If not, you may be experiencing co-channel overlap with someone
    else's AP. Please check your configuration against the following article:


    Wireless Connection Troubleshooting in Windows XP Service Pack 2 (For users
    connecting to a Wireless Access Point or Wireless Router)

    http://www.ryanyounger.plus.com/wireless/article3.htm



    --
    All the best,

    Ryan Younger.
    http://spaces.msn.com/members/wirelessnetworking/ - Ryan's Wireless
    Networking Weblog

     
    Ryan Younger, Nov 30, 2005
    #2
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  3. Hi
    Might be excessive noise form 2.4GHz phone or similar device.
    What the Signal Strength Bars mean in Wireless hardware? -
    http://www.ezlan.net/wbars.html
    Jack (MVP-Networking).
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Dec 1, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Jack, Great point, I do have several 5.8Hz phones around. I will switch them
    off and see. However the other two desktops have the 5.8Hz next to them as
    well!
     
    Guest, Dec 1, 2005
    #4
  5. Guest

    Ryan Younger Guest

    5Ghz devices will only affect you if you are using 802.11a, as you say a
    number of devices operate within this band and can cause noise.

    802.11b and 802.11g use the 2.4Ghz band. Devices such as microwave's
    contain magnetrons which operate within this band (mine operates at 2450Mhz
    = 2.4Ghz), they can cause interference but are quite well shielded. Other
    wireless devices also cause noise within this band.

    You can use Netstumbler to gauge signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Again, this
    is covered in the article I referred you to earlier:


    Wireless Connection Troubleshooting in Windows XP Service Pack 2 (For users
    connecting to a Wireless Access Point or Wireless Router)

    http://www.ryanyounger.plus.com/wireless/article3.htm




    --
    All the best,

    Ryan Younger.
    http://spaces.msn.com/members/wirelessnetworking/ - Ryan's Wireless
    Networking Weblog

     
    Ryan Younger, Dec 1, 2005
    #5
  6. With 802.11a stay away from channels 153 through 161.
    Many US products don't even offer those channels...

    I've got 5.8 GHz phones here and tons of 802.11a with no interference
    whatsoever..

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    Expert Zone Columnist
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman MVP-Windows, Dec 1, 2005
    #6
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