Why is porting numbers such an issue?

Discussion in 'VOIP' started by Al Puzzuoli, Dec 19, 2004.

  1. Then you must be blind as well as easily irritated. :) It's obvious
    that the thread had migrated to discussing the spotty cell coverage in
    the US. Unless, that is, someplace else in the world has locations
    named Raleigh, NC or Houston, TX.

    Do you consider any mention of the US by an American to be arrogant? Do
    Americans need to start placing disclaimers at the beginning of posts
    so that those in the UK don't get their panties in a bunch over the
    mere mention of sites within the US?

    It was more than apparent from the context that the US was being
    discussed.
     
    [email protected], Feb 15, 2005
    #41
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  2. Oh please. The original post in the thread indicated he had service from
    SBC. a few posts further down pacbell is discussed. That meanswe are
    discussing the USA. If the thread had started out with someone mentining
    he had service from BT, i'd assume we were dicussing the UK.
     
    T. Sean Weintz, Feb 16, 2005
    #42
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  3. Al Puzzuoli

    Ivor Jones Guest

    This assumes everyone in the world is familiar with the names of every
    telco in the world. As it happens I have heard of Pacbell, having spent a
    long time in California over the years, but not everyone is so don't
    assume, please. I have never heard of SBC for example and I wouldn't
    expect a US reader who maybe has never been to the UK to have heard of BT
    (who isn't the only UK telco BTW).


    Ivor
     
    Ivor Jones, Feb 16, 2005
    #43
  4. Ivor,

    I would agree with you if that had been the only clue. We certainly
    can't expect everyone to know the names of all of our telcos here, even
    just the big ones. However, several posts mentioned the USA; America;
    Houston, TX; Dallas, TX; Chapel Hill, NC; Raleigh, NC. I think one can
    reasonably infer that we're discussing the United States at that point.
    :)

    Perhaps it's just the way my newsreader chose to present the order of
    the posts but they had been plainly discussing the US for several posts
    before David Floyd's post.

    Oh well, that's Usenet for you. Let's shake hands and move on...
     
    [email protected], Feb 16, 2005
    #44
  5. Al Puzzuoli

    David Ross Guest

    Although we are a bit off-topic here - what is the reason for America's
    Yes. The vastly different tax (read government policy), social, and
    development structures make for very different development paths. If
    nothing else WWI and WWII had vastly different impacts on the opposite
    sides of the Atlantic when it comes to utility and public service type
    operations.
     
    David Ross, Feb 16, 2005
    #45
  6. Al Puzzuoli

    Ivor Jones Guest

    True, but the *original* post in this thread didn't.
    Fair enough.

    Ivor
     
    Ivor Jones, Feb 16, 2005
    #46
  7. In a VOIP news group I sure as hell WOULD expect that. At least for
    folks to know the MAJOR ones in the more common countries. If I see a
    company I don't know referred to I Google it. A quick google on SBC
    would tell anyone what country was being dealt with.
     
    T. Sean Weintz, Feb 16, 2005
    #47
  8. Yes, l;ack of standards, and lack of regulation in part. It's all market
    driven. Why would private companies invest in the more rural areas when
    it will be decades before they get an return on that investment? More
    populated areas odder immediate profits.

    sometimes capitalism sucks.
     
    T. Sean Weintz, Feb 16, 2005
    #48
  9. T. Sean Weintz skrev:
    Well, I guess the European telecompanies don't do it for charity,
    either. The GSM international standard with roaming agreements across
    the borders has been quite a financial success - paid by the customers.
    The cell phone penetration in Europe would never get as high as it is
    without decent coverage. It is a kind of chicken and egg issue really -
    you won't reach a critical mass until coverage makes it attractive.

    So the market mechanisms, or capitalism if you prefer, should definitely
    not be blamed for the lack of cell coverage in Northern America. I think
    it is a combination of very favorably priced landline telephone system
    as mentioned earlier in this thread, and a pricing model for cell phones
    that makes it less attractive to private customers. (I guess you still
    have to pay to RECEIVE calls in the US?) In addition to that, the
    European / international GSM systems have introduced SMS - the "killer"
    application that the technocrats invented by accident. SMS is the
    primary communication form between millions of young people in Europe
    today. Everybody is expected to be available at any time - if you're a
    teenager and do not answer your friends' SMSes within minutes you are
    totally out. (all this according to my 14 y old daughter, who found it
    extremely frustrating to be out of reach most of the time last year when
    we were in Florida for a few days...)

    Svein
    .... still apologizing for keeping this off-topic thread alive, but I
    could not resist...
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Svein_H=F8vik?=, Feb 16, 2005
    #49
  10. T. Sean Weintz skrev:

    Well, I guess the European telecompanies don't do it for charity,
    either. The GSM international standard with roaming agreements across
    the borders has been quite a financial success - paid by the customers.
    The cell phone penetration in Europe would never get as high as it is
    without decent coverage. It is a kind of chicken and egg issue really -
    you won't reach a critical mass until coverage makes it attractive.

    So the market mechanisms, or capitalism if you prefer, should definitely
    not be blamed for the lack of cell coverage in Northern America. I think
    it is a combination of very favorably priced landline telephone system
    as mentioned earlier in this thread, and a pricing model for cell phones
    that makes it less attractive to private customers. (I guess you still
    have to pay to RECEIVE calls in the US?) In addition to that, the
    European / international GSM systems have introduced SMS - the "killer"
    application that the technocrats invented by accident. SMS is the
    primary communication form between millions of young people in Europe
    today. Everybody is expected to be available at any time - if you're a
    teenager and do not answer your friends' SMSes within minutes you are
    totally out. (all this according to my 14 y old daughter, who found it
    extremely frustrating to be out of reach most of the time last year when
    we were in Florida for a few days...)

    Svein
    .... apologizing for still keeping this off-topic thread alive, just
    couldn't resist...
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Svein_H=F8vik?=, Feb 16, 2005
    #50
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