Why don't pictures look the same on different computers?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by WF, May 21, 2005.

  1. WF

    WF Guest

    I had quite the unpleasant surprise today. A picture I had made on
    my computer had won a 2nd place prize in a district computer graphics
    competition. I was not present at the display a few weeks ago and did
    not view it on their computer monitor. When I got the cd back on which
    it was saved as a BMP the local gallery owner, having heard of my win,
    asked me to let her see it and maybe display it (local boy makes good
    type of thing) When she loaded it up and displayed it, I just about
    keeled over! It was horrible! The colors weren't the same as on my
    machine and much of it was greyed out. She printed it out on her laser
    printer and it looked the same as on her display. We took it next door
    to a friends machine and it looked even worse on that one! I started
    wondering what they saw at the competition!? Were the judges blind or
    maybe the computer was the same type as my own.
    My question is, how can I make sure other people can see on their
    computers, what I invision on mine? Isn't it possible for
    manufacturers to have the same color display on every monitor? How can
    I adjust her monitor to show the same display colors as mine? Neither
    of us are computer whizes, but it would be nice for us to see the same
    thing.
     
    WF, May 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. What's the URL to the image?
     
    Blinky the Shark, May 21, 2005
    #2
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  3. You can do color matching on a Windows machine, but it's not quite what
    it oughtta be. You can also do it on a Mac to more precise standards.
    But if your computer and your client's computer are both set up (for
    example) at 1024x768 at 32 bit color depth, you should be able to get
    pretty close by adjusting brightness, contrast and maybe color on the
    monitor. And better video cards give you quite a bit of latitude in
    adjusting the colors in the video display software. Right click on the
    desktop, choose Properties, then Settings, Advanced and you hopefully
    will see a tab for color adjustments. Or alternately there may be an
    icon in the system tray for the video's control software.

    Keep in mind flat panel monitors and CRT monitors will look different,
    often with the older CRT technology looking better.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, May 21, 2005
    #3
  4. WF

    Pennywise Guest

    |> I had quite the unpleasant surprise today. A picture I had made on
    |>my computer had won a 2nd place prize in a district computer graphics
    |>competition. I was not present at the display a few weeks ago and did
    |>not view it on their computer monitor. When I got the cd back on which
    |>it was saved as a BMP the local gallery owner, having heard of my win,
    |>asked me to let her see it and maybe display it (local boy makes good
    |>type of thing) When she loaded it up and displayed it, I just about
    |>keeled over! It was horrible! The colors weren't the same as on my
    |>machine and much of it was greyed out. She printed it out on her laser
    |>printer and it looked the same as on her display. We took it next door
    |>to a friends machine and it looked even worse on that one! I started
    |>wondering what they saw at the competition!? Were the judges blind or
    |>maybe the computer was the same type as my own.
    |> My question is, how can I make sure other people can see on their
    |>computers, what I invision on mine? Isn't it possible for
    |>manufacturers to have the same color display on every monitor? How can
    |>I adjust her monitor to show the same display colors as mine? Neither
    |>of us are computer whizes, but it would be nice for us to see the same
    |>thing.
    |>

    Ya, what's a link to this Graphic...

    But no your picture will look different on any monitor that the gamma
    hasn't been adjusted. As a graphic artist this should be the first
    thing you do before starting.

    Google: gamma adjustment or gamma correction

    --
     
    Pennywise, May 21, 2005
    #4
  5. WF

    WF Guest

    WF, May 21, 2005
    #5
  6. WF

    joevan Guest

    Is it meant to be blurry? That is what I got from you url.
     
    joevan, May 21, 2005
    #6
  7. WF

    why? Guest

    As well as the important Gamma, already mentioned. Screen Res / Color
    depth, color temp and more likey several other options. There should be
    many tutorial www.google.com and digital art type newsgroups that can
    help.

    It's a JPG ouch! Whatever the original format was JPG introduces lossy
    compression (usually variable in whatever app you created it in).

    The original (your's ?) BMP (or even the paint app native format i.e.
    psp for Paint Shop Pro) as higher quality formats is the best format to
    use.

    If I do a quick test, a paint shop pro original 291K
    GIF (bad choice) 40K (for this case)
    TIF 110K
    PNG 77K
    JPG 18K
    BMP 298K

    With default options saving from the PSP native format everything warned
    me while saving of limitations in the output format.

    Using a JPG means the loss of a large amount of information for your
    example in the URL.

    <snip>

    Me
     
    why?, May 21, 2005
    #7
  8. A bunch of digital cameras either don't give you a choice of format or
    make it difficult to figure out how to switch to a higher quality. I'd
    be surprised if that pic's bluriness is entirely due to over
    compression. But I viewed it in Irfanview. At about 40% of it's current
    size it looks pretty good. I think it's a nice pic when viewed correctly.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, May 21, 2005
    #8
  9. WF

    Paul B. Guest

    I run two LCD monitors, different brands, side by side, both
    powered by the same dual-head card. Both great monitors, but I've
    found it impossible to get them to nearly match each other for
    color warmth, despite all the fancy firmware that supposedly
    allows for that.


    p.
     
    Paul B., May 21, 2005
    #9
  10. WF

    WF Guest

    First, the image I posted here had to be a JPG. I don't have high
    speed internet or my own web page. Everytime I tried to post it on
    VillagePhoto, it was too large and was rejected.

    The rules for the competition were that it must be a BMP.and it turned
    out to be 1.55 megs.
    Crunching it into a jpeg dropped that to 55 K. No wonder it looked
    fuzzy.

    I used Gimp to create this Bmp. My monitor is the older CRT and the
    competition computers were all laptops. This is all I know of the
    display they used.

    I guess the best thing to do when sending an entry to any future
    competition, is to send with it, a high quality printed image to give
    the judges some visual comparison for at least the colors that were
    used. I know the picture viewer I have, Viewpro, included a bmp with
    color squares and such for adjusting the monitor.
     
    WF, May 22, 2005
    #10
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