Why does every one hate Microsoft

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Dana, Oct 25, 2006.

  1. Dana

    Dana Guest

    Yep, as your above with the neighbor kid would not happen, as the FBI would
    know that it is a prank
    And their parents. But a lot of that especially snitching on your parents
    were bought about by those on the left, like teacher unions, teachers, and
    left leaning politicians.
    Yes, but with the new world order of suitcase nukes, and deadly germs that
    can be carried by a person, you have to accept that security measures are
    needed, especially when states like Germany or France would be more than
    happy to fund an Arab to come over to America and release a weapon like
    that.
    Not only do we have to be concerned about the intentions of radical moslems,
    we need to watch our so called friends like Germany and France.
     
    Dana, Oct 27, 2006
    #61
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  2. Dana

    JAB Guest

    No honestly it was the second most stupid post I've seen in a long time.
    I can't believe that any one person can be so sure they are right when
    they are complete wrong. You're not strongly religious are you as you
    seem to be stuck with dogma regardless on any facts they may be presented.
     
    JAB, Oct 27, 2006
    #62
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  3. Dana

    Dana Guest

    The facts are that radical islamists are bent on causing harm to America and
    her citizens.
    If you want to avoid this truth, knock yourself out.
     
    Dana, Oct 27, 2006
    #63
  4. Dana

    JAB Guest

    Sorry you didn't seem to answer my question ... "You're not strongly
    religious are you as you seem to be stuck with dogma regardless of any
    facts they may be presented."
     
    JAB, Oct 27, 2006
    #64
  5. Dana

    Jim Watt Guest

    Jim Watt, Oct 27, 2006
    #65
  6. Dana

    Dana Guest

    Religion is not the issue here. And I am not stuck on any religious dogma.
    I recognize the threat coming from those so called Islamic religious leaders
    who are encouraging their ignorant followers to engage in violence against
    western interests, especially American people.
     
    Dana, Oct 27, 2006
    #66
  7. Dana

    JAB Guest

    You couldn't even piece to an argument that managed to amount to half
    decent in the other part of this thread. It seems unlikely you will do
    any better with this topic.
     
    JAB, Oct 27, 2006
    #67
  8. Dana

    Dana Guest

    Yes, yes, that is all very good.
    But the fact remains that the procedures that the government is putting in
    place has no effect on those that DO NOT WANT TO KILL MANY PEOPLE.
    The only people worried about the direction of government in the war against
    terror, is those that have something to hide.
     
    Dana, Oct 27, 2006
    #68
  9. Dana

    Dana Guest

    I just will not let you divert the topic.
     
    Dana, Oct 27, 2006
    #69
  10. Dana

    JAB Guest

    Oh dear ...
     
    JAB, Oct 27, 2006
    #70
  11. Dana

    John Hyde Guest

    You need to go back to your high school civics teacher and demand your
    money back.

    *PLONK*
     
    John Hyde, Oct 27, 2006
    #71
  12. Dana

    kurt wismer Guest

    there are a variety of kernel level events and conditions that cannot be
    trapped without access to the kernel... a wide variety of the more
    proactive security technologies (of which microsoft have none because
    they're a newbie in this field) depend on being able to trap those things...

    if you think sacrificing behaviour based security technologies in order
    to kill off kernel mode 'rootkits' and precious little else is a fair
    trade off then i've got this bridge i've been trying to sell...
     
    kurt wismer, Oct 28, 2006
    #72
  13. Dana

    erewhon Guest

    I believe that the issue was Internet Explorer being integrated with the
    Then you fail to understand how exploit code works, and why vulnerabilites
    on other o/s components are linked and exploited in IE.
    Of course it will. Why would a user pay for another AV/firwall/Spyware/SPAM
    filter if one is built in. From a user perspective, having this built in is
    a good thing, since they abdicate any responsibilty to having to protect
    themselves, and pay extra to someone else for the privelidge. From a vendor
    perspective, if your job is to sell AV/firwall/Spyware/SPAM filter, you are
    going to scream anti-competition rules. HOwever, their market is based on
    filling a void left by Microsoft. Tough shit they have to change their
    marketplace when Microsoft fills the gap themselves.

    The vendors will still exist - but in far fewer numbers and selling far
    fewer products, to specialists, techies, and those in-the-know.

    Microsoft are win-win here. They get to bundle these as security features
    which are sold as a good thing, and re-bill you time and again for OneCare
    style services to keep it useful.
    Because an independant product can take a different approah than the one
    proposed by M$. It may be more feature rich and better at the job than the
    M$ tool.

    XP SP2 has a built in firewall. Compare and contrast this to Outpost - I
    know which i respect and trust more.
    The point is, their design principles must be flawed, since NT3.51 thro 98,
    ME, 2000, 2003... they continue to suffer from the same type of code
    exploits and vulnerabilites they were expieriencing on the first version.

    They should have learnt something during that time.
    A consequence of built in features resulted in losing Netscape in favour of
    Internet Explorer. Given the number of holes in it, I know which I prefer.
     
    erewhon, Oct 28, 2006
    #73
  14. Dana

    Dana Guest

    But I do.
     
    Dana, Oct 28, 2006
    #74
  15. Dana

    B. Nice Guest

    Bad example. The outpost firewall has had serious errors for years
    making it a security threat in itself.

    For example, a design error which makes it possible for a restricted
    user to easily gain system privileges with the help of outpost.

    I have'nt checked if the guys at agnitum finally fixed this in the
    newly released version 4 of outpost - but I doubt that, since it would
    require a major re-write of their code.

    Bottom line is, that agnitum is by no means more trustworthy than MS
    in terms of security. But then again, that is true for most vendors of
    socalled "personal firewalls".

    /B. Nice
     
    B. Nice, Oct 28, 2006
    #75
  16. Dana

    Yourhighness Guest

    LOL. I am just another one of those "proud Europeans" who is looking a
    bit further than just over the corner of my plate, like it seems you
    are doing...
    LOL. On what planet are you living? They do not? What about MS IE and
    MS Media player?You cannot even uninstall Internet Explorer without
    further hassles and you call that not forcing us in decisions.



    - Hide quoted text -
    - Show quoted text -
    Mhhm, which state then? If you had googled you would be aware that this
    is a company operating Europe wide and a joint-venture of several
    governments. Also a state run business does not imply being subsidized
    by the state itself! Especially since you have here more than one state
    involved...
    Speechless, since this is the dumbest thing I have heard you say so
    far. It gives me a good picture of yourself tho and prolly would fall
    under all those cliches some Europeans have of americans...
    Ha, I dont think you are religious, I think you are paranoid!
     
    Yourhighness, Oct 28, 2006
    #76
  17. Well, then try this one:

    dd if=/dev/zero bs=1g count=1 | gzip -9 > crash.html.gz

    (or dd if=\\.\Zero bs=1g count=1 | gzip -9 > crash.html.gz for the Windows
    users)

    Put it on a web server that supports HTTP 1.1 and Gzip/Deflate encoding.

    Open it up with Firefox, Opera or Links2 - it will allocate a huge amount
    of RAM, swap a lot, but regain normal activity once the website it closed.

    Now try the same with IE. Not just that it will allocate twice the needed
    amount of RAM, but it will also lead the explorer.exe shell into swapping
    as well, never stop swapping, and crashing at the end, usually taking down
    the entire system.

    Now, isn't integration a nice thing? :)
     
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Oct 28, 2006
    #77
  18. Well, in these terms Windows Firewall on XPSP2 would be the choice. It
    doesn't include this useless Application Control or those various SelfDOS
    mechanisms. It does not hog all CPU resources when facing a little mixture
    of SYN-, UDP- and ICMP-Flooding. It does not provide any privilege
    escalation bugs (at least none by design). It's pretty non-obtrusive.

    Yes, it does ignore sockets with the RawIP option. However, normal users
    don't have access to RawIP by default.
     
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Oct 28, 2006
    #78
  19. Dana

    erewhon Guest

    I don't think it is useless to be aware of what apps are attempting to
    connect to the internet, and then restrict them
    I have seen this on Outpost. Using Cisco VPN client, it is completely random
    as to whether it works, refuses to work, or hogs 100% CPU!
    Can you give a link to demonstrate the Outpost bugs of this nature?
    & non-informative.
     
    erewhon, Oct 28, 2006
    #79
  20. Dana

    Ron Lopshire Guest

    Giving a choice between sticking with MS or getting into bed with HP
    or Sun, I will stick with MS, thank you very much. Sun cannot even
    develop a decent installer. And I have never used any HP software that
    was not a total POS.

    You are correct about Unix, though. Even the bullheaded dweebs at
    Apple gave up on their POS file system/kernel, and switched to a Unix
    kernel with Mac OS X.
    As they say,

    1) Follow the money.
    2) Money talks, and bullshit walks.

    I don't begrudge MS one bit for their market position. They didn't
    hold a gun to anyone's head.

    Ron :)
     
    Ron Lopshire, Oct 28, 2006
    #80
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