Why did the professional camera reviewers totally miss a serious flaw in the camera?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jeanette Guire, Oct 15, 2007.

  1. Where in world did you come up with duck? One doesn't
    So why the latter?

    It might originally have been called duck tape. See the Etymology section of
    the Wikipedia article.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duct_tape

    The issue is confusing, because it wasn't used for ducts until long after it
    was invented.
     
    William Sommerwerck, Oct 21, 2007
    #41
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  2. Not so confusing now, as apparently there's a manufacturer of the stuff
    with "Duck" in its name, putting out a product called
    "'Duck Tape' brand of duct tape." Obviously in their interest to have
    folks call it "Duck", but I've not run across this brand ever, but it
    explains a whole lot.
     
    John McWilliams, Oct 21, 2007
    #42
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  3. Jeanette Guire

    Robert Haar Guest

    And what is worse is that the stuff commonly called "duct tape" - fabric
    tape with a silvery but non-metallic coating is actually a very bad choice
    for sealing ducts. There are varieties of tape that are made for sealing
    ducts but the common "duct" tape is not one of them.

    I am surprised that no one has mentioned gaffers tape.
     
    Robert Haar, Oct 21, 2007
    #43
  4. John wrote on Sun, 21 Oct 2007 10:25:15 -0700:

    ??>> Then you don't know the proper way to use duck (duct)
    ??>> tape. In a case like this, you use the tape to hold
    ??>> something against the door, so it CAN'T move.

    JM> Where in world did you come up with duck?? One doesn't tape
    JM> ducks; one tapes ducts. except it isn't very good for
    JM> that.....

    I see the name is much discussed later but I would debate
    whether it is not useful for ducts. It's doing very well in my
    house and is good for a lot of other things!


    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    E-mail, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not
     
    James Silverton, Oct 21, 2007
    #44
  5. Gaffer's tape is mentioned in the Wiki article, and it's mentioned in
    the first line that duct tape ain't so good for ducts.
     
    John McWilliams, Oct 21, 2007
    #45
  6. John wrote on Sun, 21 Oct 2007 13:05:09 -0700:

    JM> Robert Haar wrote:
    ??>> On 10/21/07 3:01 PM, "William Sommerwerck"
    ??>>
    ??>>>> Where in world did you come up with duck? One doesn't
    ??>>>> tape ducks; one tapes ducts. Except it isn't very good
    ??>>>> for that...
    ??>>> So why the latter?
    ??>>>
    ??>>> It might originally have been called duck tape. See the
    ??>>> Etymology section of the Wikipedia article.
    ??>>>
    ??>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duct_tape
    ??>>>
    ??>>> The issue is confusing, because it wasn't used for ducts
    ??>>> until long after it was invented.
    ??>>
    ??>> And what is worse is that the stuff commonly called "duct
    ??>> tape" - fabric tape with a silvery but non-metallic
    ??>> coating is actually a very bad choice for sealing ducts.
    ??>> There are varieties of tape that are made for
    ??>> sealing ducts but the common "duct" tape is not one of
    ??>> them.
    ??>>
    ??>> I am surprised that no one has mentioned gaffers tape.

    JM> Gaffer's tape is mentioned in the Wiki article, and it's
    JM> mentioned in the first line that duct tape ain't so good
    JM> for ducts.

    Despite Wikipedia, I think we should stick to photography :)
    I'm not sure whether we are talking about the same thing!

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    E-mail, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not
     
    James Silverton, Oct 21, 2007
    #46
  7. Despite having used it for many years I've never heard the apostrophe
    added. It's gaffer tape.
     
    Dave Plowman (News), Oct 21, 2007
    #47
  8. Jeanette Guire

    pltrgyst Guest

    "Duck Tape" has been a trademark registered in the US since 1993, for "Elongated
    Tape Having a Pressure Sensitive Adhesive on One Side... FIRST USE IN COMMERCE:
    19800114." The owner is "Manco Tape, Inc. CORPORATION OHIO 2040 W. 110 St.
    Cleveland OHIO 44107."

    -- Larry
     
    pltrgyst, Oct 22, 2007
    #48
  9. Jeanette Guire

    Noozer Guest

    Duck tape and duct tape are TWO DIFFERENT THINGS!!!!

    Duck tape is made from cloth and is a REALLY bad choice for using on ducts.
    It was designed originally to repair tarps and withstand the weather.

    Duct tape is made from metal foil and is designed for use on metal ductwork.
     
    Noozer, Oct 22, 2007
    #49
  10. Steve Barker LT, Oct 22, 2007
    #50
  11. Jeanette Guire

    dj_nme Guest

    Metal tape with adhesive is known as "flashing tape", used to seal the
    edges of roofs to prevent the ingress of moisture under the edge of
    roofing material or between walls that are built hard up against each other.
    Flashing used to be done with lead foil sealed/glued with pitch, now it
    is done with adhesive metal [usually aluminium] tape, hence "flashing tape".
    In Australia, generic "duct tape" is essentially like a very wide
    electrical tape: a stretchy PVC backing with glue on it, usually about 2
    inches wide.
    This tape that's cloth backed in plastic with an easy release adhesive
    sounds more like "gaffer tape", which is used extensively in the
    entertainment industry to hold electrical cables in place and for
    slapdash on-the-spot repairs.
    A "gaffer" is an on-set electrician used during the making of a movie or
    in-house electrician for a theatre, hence "gaffer tape".
     
    dj_nme, Oct 22, 2007
    #51
  12. Jeanette Guire

    G Guest

    I never came across using aluminum foil tape as flashing. I have used
    it for ducts, for hot exaust pipes, and other uses. Flexible sticky flashing
    is now usually done with mineral based sheeting with polyethelene
    backing. Most auto parts stores sell metal tape. I used some stainless
    tape for covering chrome or chrome like parts. I just recently came across
    the cloth tape with mild stick, or gaffers tape. New to me. There are
    different backings for duck tape. I like using the remants of the not
    available anymore, 100 MPH tape from Sprotsman Guide, orginally used
    to repair aircraft wings. It has a stretch unlike most, and really
    holds up and sticks well.


    greg
     
    G, Oct 22, 2007
    #52
  13. Kinda like "Can peas" or "Tin peas" in a sense. I'm sure many call it so
    without the possessive, but if it's used mostly by gaffers, it should be
    in the form I put it. Unless there is a widely used verb (by those in
    the Biz.) "to gaff".
     
    John McWilliams, Oct 22, 2007
    #53
  14. Jeanette Guire

    msg Guest

    This is a redirect to a 3M product spec page; for this item and
    others in the same category, there is _no_ reference to
    using the product on 'ducts' anywhere in the description.
     
    msg, Oct 22, 2007
    #54
  15. Jeanette Guire

    G Guest

    I never really considered using the stuff on ducts. I always noticed after
    years, the tape would get hard, fall apart and become useless. Some
    types last longer, but the typical silver tape.

    greg
     
    G, Oct 22, 2007
    #55
  16. Jeanette Guire

    G Guest

    I never really considered using the stuff on ducts. I always noticed after
    years, the tape would get hard, fall apart and become useless. Some
    types last longer, but the typical silver tape.[/QUOTE]

    While it would seem to be perfect for ducts, the fall apart business seems
    to be the key to it usufullness. Read
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duct_tape
     
    G, Oct 22, 2007
    #56
  17. The 'gaffer' is the charge hand electrician on a film etc crew. And only
    really one per unit. With a large crew on a big rig he is more likely to
    delegate the jobs needed to be done than do them himself - like any good
    crew chief. Organise the work among his crew to prevent two doing the same
    job - or the lazy ones doing nothing.
    Perhaps the primary use of gaffer tape these days is fixing filters to
    window frames etc. But I dunno if that was the original intended use -
    although old I'm not *that* old. ;-)
    But the same tape is equally used by other crafts within the trade - even
    although others also have their own tape, like camera tape, fairly
    similar to gaffer in construction in that it's fabric reinforced but 1"
    wide and white and originally used to seal film tins.
     
    Dave Plowman (News), Oct 22, 2007
    #57
  18. Jeanette Guire

    Steve Barker Guest

    It IS duct tape however. What do you think it was originally designed for?

    s
     
    Steve Barker, Oct 22, 2007
    #58
  19. I wonder on what sort of construction?

    In the UK where buildings pretty well all have stone walls, the lead
    flashing is bent into a 'chase' created in the masonry, usually the mortar
    between coarses, secured with lead wedges and mortar applied afterwards to
    seal. A lime based mortar is best to accommodate some movement. Down the
    edge of a roof where it meets the brickwork it will be cut into a step
    shape to follow the line of the horizontal bricks. And it's still very
    much in use today - despite the cost.
     
    Dave Plowman (News), Oct 22, 2007
    #59
  20. Jeanette Guire

    gfretwell Guest

    duct tape was originally developed during World War II in 1942 as a
    waterproof sealing tape for ammunition cases
     
    gfretwell, Oct 23, 2007
    #60
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