which major should i take???

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by john, Sep 18, 2004.

  1. john

    john Guest

    after i get my a+,mcse,ccna certificates im planning to
    get a degree in IT... im just a bit confused what major
    am i gonna take..this is my 2 choices computer
    information systems and network communication
    management.. i need your suggestions about it
    and does getting a masters degree worth?
     
    john, Sep 18, 2004
    #1
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  2. circa Sat, 18 Sep 2004 12:51:39 -0700, in
    microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, john
    () said,
    Do whichever is comprised of courses that look more interesting to
    you.
    With or without experience? If without, no, it's pretty much
    worthless.

    Laura
     
    Laura A. Robinson, Sep 18, 2004
    #2
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  3. john

    Jeff Cochran Guest

    Business Administration, followed by an MBA. Much better and more
    useful than any of the IS degrees.

    That said, what you want is Management Information Systems for a
    master if you're looking for employment. A Bachelor's in Computer
    Science is better than Info Systems, but neither is that great at
    getting the first job out of college. Do a lot of extracurricula work
    in programing, networking or whatever you want a career to begin with.

    Jeff
     
    Jeff Cochran, Sep 19, 2004
    #3
  4. i need your suggestions about it
    what! an MSc is worthless!

    The idea is to get a good education which (hopefully) gets you that
    first job in your chosen career, enabling you start gaining that all
    important experience. Gaining an MSc might be worthless if you're
    fifty five, but then so is starting a pension at that age :)

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
     
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Sep 19, 2004
    #4
  5. after i get my a+,mcse,ccna certificates im planning to
    become a lawyer.

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
     
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Sep 19, 2004
    #5
  6. john

    Rowdy Yates Guest

    and marry a MILF!!
     
    Rowdy Yates, Sep 19, 2004
    #6
  7. john

    Neil Guest

    babbling on and on again Rowdy Yates
    why would you marry Microsoft Instructor Lead Format?

    :)
     
    Neil, Sep 19, 2004
    #7
  8. circa Sun, 19 Sep 2004 21:19:51 +0100, in
    microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, The Poster Formerly Known as Kline
    Okay, I'm spearheading recruiting for the Microsoft Technologies
    group in a company that makes over five *billion* dollars a year.
    Which one of us do you think has a better idea what companies are
    looking for?

    Laura
     
    Laura A. Robinson, Sep 20, 2004
    #8
  9. circa Sun, 19 Sep 2004 03:21:28 GMT, in
    microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, Jeff Cochran ()
    said,
    That really depends on what the OP wants to do. Don't assume that
    s/he wants to be a manager.
    Not at all the case. It entirely depends on the job s/he is looking
    to do.
    See above.
    See above. It is the baseline that gets one past the majority of HR
    departments.
    Agreed.

    Laura
     
    Laura A. Robinson, Sep 20, 2004
    #9
  10. circa Mon, 20 Sep 2004 00:25:02 -0400, in
    microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, Laura A. Robinson
    () said,
    Oh, and I'm arrogant, too. <G>

    Laura
     
    Laura A. Robinson, Sep 20, 2004
    #10
  11. john

    Jeff Cochran Guest

    Manager or not, currently an MBA is more desirable than a MIS for the
    vast majority of businesses. An exception may be a tech or a research
    company, but then they'd be likely looking for a MS in computer
    science with a decent research project or thesis applicable to the
    line of work.

    The BS in Business Administration is also more useful in terms of
    employement for the majority of students who would be doing a BS in
    Management Information Systems or Network Communications (gotta admit,
    haven't seen that degree available from the normal range of
    schools...). There's nothing to preclude a minor in business or
    computer-releated degrees to complement the other as a major.
    Based on the two catregories the OP posted, it's much more likely.
    Current employment rates are all I based this on, a higher percentage
    of CompSci students currently receive offers within 90 days out of
    school than InfoSys students. But school reputation, industry sector
    and all kind of other factors influence this even more.
    Normally it's a four-year degree, not necessarily a specific degree.
    But it does depend on the hiring organization. Of course, I'm guessing
    by the original post as to the OP's goals, and could be way off base.
    Also, plan on an education that adapts to your changing career. In
    the IT/Computer world, it *will* change. The best long-term employee
    is the one who is prepared to change and not afraid to. That means
    that whatever your degree choice, load up on English, Humanities and
    Business courses whenever you can.

    Jeff
     
    Jeff Cochran, Sep 20, 2004
    #11
  12. john

    Guest Guest

    You don't need to get a degree in the IT(A.S., B.S,
    M.S.). You have enough knowledge on the IT field. Its
    time start looking for that IT job.

    Sincerely
    Fellow IT Guy
     
    Guest, Sep 20, 2004
    #12
  13. circa Mon, 20 Sep 2004 13:43:19 GMT, in
    microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, Jeff Cochran ()
    said,
    I guarantee you, "the vast majority of businesses" are not looking
    for MBAs for entry-level IT jobs.
    See above.
    Irrelevant to my point.
    You don't know what the OP wants to do. He did not post such. He
    merely posted the two options offered by his university/college.
    I base it on the fact that I'm spending waaay more time dealing with
    the IT job market than I like. I posted elsewhere why this is.
    *It depends on the job the OP wants to do.*
    Um, that's my point. You're making generalized statements without
    knowing the OP's career plans and presenting them as his only
    feasible options.
    You might want to peruse Monster/Dice/Yahoo Jobs/etc. a bit more; you
    may be surprised.
    That is my point. Don't tell somebody to do this laundry list of
    things that aren't even related to his original question when you've
    not even bothered to ask him what he wants to DO. Your
    recommendations are fine, but they're not appropriate for everybody,
    and without having asked the OP what he wants to actually *do*, you
    don't know that they're appropriate for him.
    Yes, well, as evidenced by 90% of the posts in newsgroups like this,
    woefully few are taking that particular advice. <sigh>

    Laura
     
    Laura A. Robinson, Sep 21, 2004
    #13
  14. circa Sun, 19 Sep 2004 21:19:51 +0100, in
    microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, The Poster Formerly Known as Kline
    BTW, it's not worthless in principle, just in landing an entry-level
    IT job. :) Our entry-level IT people with Master's degrees start in
    the same place as those with Bachelor's degrees. That's just the
    nature of the market right now.

    From an educational standpoint, of *course* getting a Master's is
    worthwhile. It's just not necessarily going to make the OP more
    marketable than he would or would not be with the other
    qualifications he listed.

    Laura
     
    Laura A. Robinson, Sep 21, 2004
    #14
  15. what! an MSc is worthless!
    So your advice to any college dude thinking of undertaking a MSc is to
    forget it and go straight to microsoft or one of their partners, is
    that it? Wow, the starting salary at McD's will soon be up to $40K!

    BTW, we can't all be like your leader :)

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
     
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Sep 21, 2004
    #15
  16. Oh, and I'm arrogant, too. <G>

    me too, so i'm told.

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
     
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Sep 21, 2004
    #16
  17. You have enough knowledge on the IT field. Its
    chicken meet egg, egg meet chicken....

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
     
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Sep 21, 2004
    #17
  18. circa Tue, 21 Sep 2004 09:20:35 +0100, in
    microsoft.public.cert.exam.mcse, The Poster Formerly Known as Kline
    I said no such thing. Quit misquoting me. I told the OP that in terms
    of getting an ENTRY LEVEL job if he has *no experience*, then an MS
    is not going to help.
    Do you refer to his undergrad from Johns Hopkins or his Master's from
    Harvard?

    You are sorely mistaken if you think that I do not believe there is
    value in a Master's degree, and I have clearly stated that that is
    not the case.

    I referred to the SPECIFIC QUESTION AT HAND, not to an "in general"
    query.

    Jeezus.

    Laura
     
    Laura A. Robinson, Sep 21, 2004
    #18
  19. I said no such thing. Quit misquoting me. I told the OP that in terms
    Sorry because you sniped the original post, the context was lost.

    With or without experience? If without, no, it's pretty much
    worthless.

    </original>


    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
     
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Sep 21, 2004
    #19
  20. BTW, it's not worthless in principle, just in landing an entry-level
    makes sense.

    The important thing people need to understand is to get an education
    that at least sounds gets out of the crowd. But that's always been the
    same, not just nowadays.

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
     
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Sep 21, 2004
    #20
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