When does Photography become Art?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by John Ortt, Jun 8, 2007.

  1. John Ortt

    John Turco Guest

    Hello, Neil:

    Yes, he "won" (posthumously) a "Golden Turkey Award" for that dubious
    honor. Also, his "Plan 9 From Outerspace" (1959) grabbed one, as the
    worst movie, ever.

    Those things happened, during the 1980's; Ed Wood died in 1978, at the
    age of 54.
    Okay, that makes sense. Speaking of "atrocious art," I favor Wood's
    stinkers, to those of another well-known hack director, Roger Corman.
    I believe the former's films are far more entertaining -- if only,
    perhaps, for the wrong reasons. ;-)
    Perhaps. Bigger budgets didn't noticeably improved the work of Corman,
    alas. He survived Wood, by several decades...yet, in my opinion, he's
    always been little more than a talentless bum.

    Oh, well, he's still alive, at least. <g>


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
     
    John Turco, Jun 29, 2007
    1. Advertisements

  2. John Ortt

    John Turco Guest


    Hello, Corry:

    A "shuttering" thought, indeed! <g>


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
     
    John Turco, Jun 29, 2007
    1. Advertisements

  3. John Ortt

    Aaron Guest

    It's been a long time since I've seen that 1931 Dracula, but I recall
    that it had some cool mechanical effects that must have frightened the
    pants off of a 1931 audience, such as Dracula quickly "sliding" across
    the floor, as vampires are wont to do.

    The 1992 remake ("Bram Stoker's Dracula") was pretty scary in its own
    right.
     
    Aaron, Jul 3, 2007
  4. [ . . . ]
    Hmmm. I don't recall sliding across the floor at all in the 1931 Dracula,
    and I've seen it several times.

    Sure you're not thinking of Nosferatu (1922, I think)? It sounds more like
    the sort of thing that was done in that movie.
    Yes, it was excellent. "Bram Stoker's Dracula" wasn't really Bram Stoker's
    Dracula, but it came closer to the novel than any of the others.

    Neil
     
    Neil Harrington, Jul 3, 2007
  5. PULL THE STRING!!!
     
    Unclaimed Mysteries, Jul 3, 2007
  6. John Ortt

    John Turco Guest


    Hello, Neil:

    Personally, I've never been much of a horror buff. Give me that good,
    straight, old-fashioned 1950's science fiction cinema, I say!

    "Fiend Without a Face" (1958; British) is a perfect example, thereof.
    In somewhat keeping with the Dracula motif, this suspenseful chiller
    [starring American actor, Marshall Thompson (1925-1992)] concerns
    "mental vampires," as it were.

    So terrifying, it was banned in Sweden! <g>


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
     
    John Turco, Jul 7, 2007
  7. John Ortt

    John Turco Guest


    Hello, Corry:

    "I play Lobo!" :)


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
     
    John Turco, Jul 7, 2007
  8. John Ortt

    Aaron Guest

    Greetings John,

    How about the classic "This Island Earth," forever immortalized in the
    riff tracks of Mystery Science Theater 3000 the Movie (which I've been
    trying to find on DVD for years), but not the most horrible campy
    sci-fi movie on its own right.

    On a more serious note, The Day the Earth Stood Still is always a good
    bet, too.
     
    Aaron, Jul 10, 2007
  9. John Ortt

    John Turco Guest

    Hello, Aaron:

    Yes, "This Island Earth" (1955) is a valiant attempt at intelligent
    science fiction. I've never been particularly impressed with its
    "vaunted" special effects or production values (other than the brilliant
    Technicolor), though. Especially, as it was claimed to be "2½ years in
    the making" -- if so, there must've been a concerted effort, in creating
    a cost overrun! <g>

    Its stars, Jeff Morrow (1907-1993) and Rex Reason, teamed up again, the
    following year, in "The Creature Walks Among Us" (1956). I consider this
    to be the best of the three "Gillman" pictures, whereas most critics
    haved panned it, as the worst.

    The original "Outer Limits" (1963-'65) series ranks at the top of
    television's sci-fi shows, in my opinion. It seems to be a blend of
    Fifties-style monsters and Sixties social commentary, and is very
    skillfully crafted, overall. (I've both seasons, on a pair of DVD
    boxed sets.)

    Incidentally, if a you're a fan of science fiction camp, you'd probably
    savor the garbage, churned out by the noted hack director, Roger Corman.
    Indeed, I own a DVD version of "The Day the Earth Stood Still" (1950),
    and have both it and the aforementioned films, on VHS tape (recorded off
    cable TV).


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>


    PS: "Fiend Without a Face" (1958; British) - which I referred to,
    in an earlier post in this thread - is, essentially, a rehash of the
    much more famous "Forbidden Planet" (1956). Officially, the former
    is loosely based on a story, published in a 1930 issue of "Weird
    Tales" (an American pulp magazine).

    Regardless, I believe "Fiend" is the superior movie, and far less
    pretentious.
     
    John Turco, Jul 12, 2007
  10. John Ortt

    John Turco Guest

    <edited>

    Hello, Aaron:

    Correction: "The Day the Earth Stood Still" (1951).


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
     
    John Turco, Jul 13, 2007
  11. John Ortt

    Aaron Guest

    Salutations Mr. John Turco:

    It turns out that you are quite the vintage film aficionado. I,
    myself, appreciate a good camp flick from time to time and always
    enjoyed shows like The Twilight Zone, but have never seen "The
    Creature Walks Among Us" or "Fiend Without a Face."

    Being a subscriber to and avid user of Netflix, I will see about
    viewing those aforementioned films at some point. Right now I have
    Citizen Kane on my TV stand, having never seen it before!

    I'll also investigate Roger Corman while I'm at it, thanks for the
    tip. If there's anything I like better than good movies it's good
    *bad* movies.
     
    Aaron, Jul 13, 2007
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.