Whats the difference: MAC and IP address??

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by bbnn, Dec 4, 2004.

  1. bbnn

    bbnn Guest

    Seems like the MAC and IP addressing does about the same thing?
     
    bbnn, Dec 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. bbnn

    °Mike° Guest

    An IP is an assigned number, whereas a MAC is totally
    unique to each and every computer, assigned at manufacture
    time, and cannot be changed.
     
    °Mike°, Dec 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. It can easily be changed.
     
    Terje Johan Abrahamsen, Dec 4, 2004
    #3
  4. bbnn

    Scraggy Guest

    In the same way a Sopwith Camel and a Harrier are aircraft.
     
    Scraggy, Dec 4, 2004
    #4
  5. bbnn

    why? Guest

    why?, Dec 4, 2004
    #5
  6. bbnn

    Timberwolf Guest

    wrong---Mac is unique to hardware (cable modem etc)
    read here
    http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/M/MAC_address.html

    IP adress is more like a "variable" street address---your pc--it is re
    assigned on new connection and or every few hours depending on your supplier
    http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/I/IP_address.html

    The system will only talk to a registered MAC but your ip changes on each
    log on/powerup etc---The MAC also allows providers to update modems etc
    without having to talk to your machine--modem powered up but pc off.
     
    Timberwolf, Dec 4, 2004
    #6
  7. bbnn

    Scraggy Guest


    Err WRONG http://www.nthelp.com/NT6/change_mac_w2k.htm
    http://www.klcconsulting.net/smac/
     
    Scraggy, Dec 4, 2004
    #7
  8. bbnn

    pcbutts1 Guest

    pcbutts1, Dec 4, 2004
    #8
  9. bbnn

    why? Guest

    That needs updated.

    MAC addresses can be changed.
    Simple way if NIC software allows -
    (Win 2000) Local Area Connection / Configure / Advanced / Locally
    Administered Addresses.

    I have also seen 1 duplicate MAC addresses at work, mind you it takes
    several thousand NICs and a few years to happen.

    <snip the odd stuff at the end>

    Me
     
    why?, Dec 4, 2004
    #9
  10. bbnn

    Scraggy Guest

    Perhaps so, but if your car is red, then gets painted blue over the top, as
    far as the rest of the world is concerned you are driving a red car. :)
     
    Scraggy, Dec 4, 2004
    #10
  11. bbnn

    Scraggy Guest

    duh, blue car, you'd be driving a BLUE car. My brain hurts, must get bigger
    shoes.
     
    Scraggy, Dec 4, 2004
    #11
  12. bbnn

    127.0.0.1 Guest

    i have changed the MAC addy of NIC cards before.
    3com cards has this utility to change em.

    it is a rare ocassion but still occurs to find the same MAC addy on more
    than one card.

    MAC is also used for other protocals (such as DLC for as400 communications).

    -a|ex
     
    127.0.0.1, Dec 4, 2004
    #12
  13. bbnn

    127.0.0.1 Guest

    top posting and giving false information.... egads

    -a|ex
     
    127.0.0.1, Dec 4, 2004
    #13
  14. If you're lucky. We got a duplicate from Compaq in the same batch of
    20 servers!
     
    Shane Matthews, Dec 5, 2004
    #14
  15. bbnn

    Dodo Guest

    MAC address is a physical address used for addressing frames.

    IP address is a logical address used for addressing IP packets.

    IP packets are encapsulated within frames for transmission across a network.

    In a routed scenario, the frame is rewritten by each router along the path.
     
    Dodo, Dec 5, 2004
    #15
  16. bbnn

    John Guest

    Sample MAC address:

    00:04:5B:3C:58:B0

    Sample IP address:

    192.168.0.1
     
    John, Dec 5, 2004
    #16
  17. bbnn

    °Mike° Guest

    Interesting. Perhaps you'd like to explain how?
     
    °Mike°, Dec 5, 2004
    #17
  18. bbnn

    127.0.0.1 Guest

    very simple, 3com has a software utility that allows changing the MAC and
    irq settings on some of their NICs. I have used this in the past when
    setting up NT servers.

    it works similar to flashing bios.

    i must be in your block list...

    -a|ex
     
    127.0.0.1, Dec 5, 2004
    #18
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