what is USB revision 2.0?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by John Brown, Mar 6, 2008.

  1. John Brown

    John Brown Guest

    Just bought a USB Network bridge cable to transfer files between pc's.
    The advert said USB specification revision 1.1 and 2 compliant.
    On receipt the packet just says 1.1 compliant and further says data transfer
    rate up to 5Mbit/sec.
    My simple understanding was 1.1 meant transfer rate of up to 5Mb/sec and 2
    meant up to 480Mb/sec and so I was expecting it would be capable of transfer
    rates up to 480Mbit/sec.
    So the question is what does USB specification revision 1.1 compliant and 2
    compliant mean?
    Cheers.
     
    John Brown, Mar 6, 2008
    #1
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  2. John Brown

    Mara Guest

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB#USB_1.0
     
    Mara, Mar 6, 2008
    #2
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  3. John Brown

    Gazwad Guest

    John Brown <>, the cadaverous-panhandler and
    debauched joy boy who likes decadent leg stretchers with axolotls, and
    whose partner is a split-arse with a glowing concha, wrote in

    You've been sold shyte.
    Return it for a full refund stating that they misrepresented what it was.

    You don't need that sort of thing anyway as you can do the same thing faster
    using other methods.


    --
    For my own part, I have never had a thought which I could not set down
    in words with even more distinctness than that with which I conceived
    it. There is, however, a class of fancies of exquisite delicacy which
    are not thoughts, and to which as yet I have found it absolutely
    impossible to adapt to language. These fancies arise in the soul, alas
    how rarely. Only at epochs of most intense tranquillity, when the
    bodily and mental health are in perfection. And at those weird points
    of time, where the confines of the waking world blend with the world of
    dreams. And so I captured this fancy, where all that we see, or seem,
    is but a dream within a dream.
     
    Gazwad, Mar 6, 2008
    #3
  4. John Brown

    John Brown Guest

    ===============
    To expand....the advert for the USB Network bridge cable said:-

    HI Speed USB 2.0 Network Cable

    USB specification revision 1.1/2.0 compliant

    Data transfer rate: Up to 5M bits/sec

    Any thoughts on how can a piece of kit be both USB2 compliant AND transfer
    only up to 5Mbits/sec (the 1.1 speed I beleive)?
     
    John Brown, Mar 6, 2008
    #4
  5. John Brown

    Mara Guest

    Some systems require drivers for USB 2.0. The system might say it's *capable*
    but that doesn't necessarily mean it *will* use 2.0 without the proper files.
     
    Mara, Mar 6, 2008
    #5
  6. John Brown

    John Brown Guest

    =================
    Yes starting to realise that...my fault...eBay and Hong Kong!
    How/what other methods?
     
    John Brown, Mar 6, 2008
    #6
  7. John Brown

    Brian Cryer Guest

    I would imagine that its a USB 1 (or 1.1) device. By saying its compatible
    with USB 2 is just marketing speak, because any USB 1 device can be plugged
    into a USB 2 port (its compatible) but will still only operate at USB 1
    speeds.
     
    Brian Cryer, Mar 6, 2008
    #7
  8. John Brown

    John Brown Guest

    ===========================
    Think I've been had :-(
     
    John Brown, Mar 6, 2008
    #8
  9. John Brown

    richard Guest

    If it was recenly produced, then it is most likely a usb 2 device.
    The wording is saying that the device will work on usb 1.1 ports as
    well.

    When you plug it in it will default to usb 1 unless you tell the
    system to use a usb 2 port.
     
    richard, Mar 6, 2008
    #9
  10. Additionally, even if a device is USB2, it can be "usb2 highspeed" with only
    12MBits/s max, or "fullspeed".
    There are no dedicated USB2 cables either - any quality USB cable connection
    between 2 endpoints with usb2 capability will turn into a USB2 cable - the
    rest is market speech as well :)
     
    wisdomkiller & pain, Mar 6, 2008
    #10
  11. John Brown

    chuckcar Guest

    Firewire, a normal hard drive cable, SCSI if they are such type of
    drives. USB is *far* too often used as a replcement for things that a)
    work better b) work faster and c) are actually *designed* for it. The
    example of a USB mouse is a perfect example: a mouse generally runs at
    9600 bps. That's approx 1/1000th the speeds we're dealing with for USB.
     
    chuckcar, Mar 6, 2008
    #11
  12. John Brown

    John Brown Guest

    ===============
    But the product features at the back of the pack says Data Transfer up to
    5Mb/sec
     
    John Brown, Mar 6, 2008
    #12
  13. John Brown

    Gazwad Guest

    John Brown <>, the cross-eyed-pariah and
    teapot-shaped bi-curious who likes harsh dolphin clubbing with
    scorpions, and whose partner is a box-house girl with a hot hina, wrote

    Ethernet is your cheapest option unless you feel like ripping parts out.


    --
    For my own part, I have never had a thought which I could not set down
    in words with even more distinctness than that with which I conceived
    it. There is, however, a class of fancies of exquisite delicacy which
    are not thoughts, and to which as yet I have found it absolutely
    impossible to adapt to language. These fancies arise in the soul, alas
    how rarely. Only at epochs of most intense tranquillity, when the
    bodily and mental health are in perfection. And at those weird points
    of time, where the confines of the waking world blend with the world of
    dreams. And so I captured this fancy, where all that we see, or seem,
    is but a dream within a dream.
     
    Gazwad, Mar 6, 2008
    #13
  14. John Brown

    ded Guest

    It meets all criteria:
    http://www.usb.org/developers/docs/
    http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb932108.aspx

    It really isn't that tricky to grasp, and all it takes is to type into
    search the key words: USB specification revision.

    Basically, you want to transfer files between PC's so it is the
    USB cards installed on each PC that dictate at what speed the
    transfer rate will be. If both PC's are USB 2, then that is the
    speed transfer will take, if one PC has a "USB 1.1" connection,
    then that will dictate the transfer speed. The network bridge
    will work at the speed dictated by the PC's. It's compliant!
     
    ded, Mar 6, 2008
    #14
  15. John Brown

    doS Guest

    yes that usb cable is smart enough to transfer at 5 instead of 480....
     
    doS, Mar 7, 2008
    #15
  16. John Brown

    John Brown Guest

    ==========================
    So...to double check...if my pc 1 and pc 2 have USB2 cards fitted (which
    they have) and I use this kit I've purchased - called a USB Network Bridge
    Cable to connect between pc's then I should be able to achieve something
    like USB 2 speeds...even though the Bridge Cable spec shows its compliant
    with 1.1 and doesn't mention USB2, and at the back of the pack it states -
    Data Transfer rate up to 5Mbpsec...is that how you read it?
     
    John Brown, Mar 7, 2008
    #16
  17. John Brown

    Phat Sam Guest

    Absolutely not. If plugging a device into a USB port using a USB 1.1
    cable rather than a USB 2.0 cable would make a difference, or using a
    USB 1.1 Hub causing devices to report running a 1.1 Speed, then
    plugging in a USB 1.1 device to network two computers, I'd only expect
    USB 1.1 Speed.
     
    Phat Sam, Mar 8, 2008
    #17
  18. John Brown

    John Brown Guest

    ok, thanks Sam
    ==========
     
    John Brown, Mar 9, 2008
    #18
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