What is two-wire DSL?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Philip Drumm, Jul 3, 2003.

  1. Philip Drumm

    Philip Drumm Guest

    My understanding is that at this point it is more of a marketing advance
    than a technological one, and that it just provides faster upload
    speeds, but only incrementally.

    Is that it in a nutshell? I'm trying to find some guides on it in plain
    English but haven't had any luck yet.

    TIA
     
    Philip Drumm, Jul 3, 2003
    #1
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  2. Philip Drumm

    Ronaldab Guest

    I don't understand....
    I thought all DSL was two wire....
    When I had DSL service there were only two wires coming in there.
    My understanding is that at this point it is more of a marketing advance
    than a technological one, and that it just provides faster upload
    speeds, but only incrementally.

    Is that it in a nutshell? I'm trying to find some guides on it in plain
    English but haven't had any luck yet.

    TIA
     
    Ronaldab, Jul 3, 2003
    #2
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  3. Philip Drumm

    trout Guest

    (please post in plain text)

    Yes, I had a quick look around, and all the references I saw were
    about 'old' two-wire; as opposed to 'new' four-wire. (?)
     
    trout, Jul 3, 2003
    #3
  4. Philip Drumm

    PhilGreg Guest

    ==> Not necessarily. There's MDSL (multirate) w/speeds up to 2.304MBS
    and HDSL w/speeds up to 1.52MBS(HighSpeed) which use 2 wires and then
    ther's ADSL ( asynchonis[sp?] w/speeds up to 1.6 MBS, which uses one
    line and which, by the way, I have. Then there's SSDSL which, IIRC has
    the same speed up and down and I can't remember the max speed. All of
    the others, again, IIRC have differing up and down speeds.
    Here's some more reading for you;
    http://www.tuketu.com/dsl/xdsl.htm
    http://www.everythingdsl.com/types/index.shtml
    http://www.vicomsoft.com/knowledge/reference/xdsl1.html#10
    http://searchnetworking.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid7_gci213915,0
    0.html
    http://www.speedguide.net/
    http://cable-dsl.home.att.net/
    http://www.dslreports.com/tweaks
    http://www.dslreports.com/information/kb

    HTH <G>

    --
    Phil

    \\\///
    ( o o )
    --------oOOO-- ( )--OOOo------
     
    PhilGreg, Jul 3, 2003
    #4
  5. Philip Drumm

    paul s Guest

    Every ADSL I've ever seen is 2-wire. And I've seen quite a few, I work for
    BT.
     
    paul s, Jul 3, 2003
    #5
  6. Howdy!

    It's DSL that comes in on only two wires, instead of four.

    THAT said - the local folks call "line-share" DSL 2-wire, and
    dedicated DSL 4-wire. Since you put the DSL over a voice or fax line, and
    it doesn't use any extra wires over what's already there for a telephone
    line (which uses 2 wires).

    Dedicated DSL, which is also SDSL around here (the two have become
    synonymous, since all the SDSL lines are dedicated, and all the dedicated
    lines are SDSL - but that's around HERE, in BellSouth - err, BellSouth
    territory), is called "four wire" even though it only uses two, since you
    have to have a voice line for billing purposes (that's two wires), and then
    you have the SDSL line (which is two wires), requiring four wires for it to
    work.

    Makes sense? No? That's alright - it IS the phone company after
    all.

    RwP
     
    Ralph Wade Phillips, Jul 3, 2003
    #6
  7. Philip Drumm

    paul s Guest

    Your regular phone line is 2 wire. ADSL just works as a carrier service on
    top.
     
    paul s, Jul 3, 2003
    #7
  8. except for the existing telephone wire which, of course, is *2 wires*
     
    Robert de Brus, Jul 4, 2003
    #8
  9. Philip Drumm

    Jim Prather Guest

    DSL works by splitting the phone line into two frequency ranges.
    Low frequencies are reserved for regular telephone calls (voice),
    while higher frequencies are used for Internet (data), making it
    possible to use the phone line for both telephone calls and for
    Internet access.

    Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (often referred as just DSL)
    is a high-speed broadband Internet service that is best suited
    for residential use. It is called "asymmetric" because the
    Internet speed to the home is faster than the speed from the
    home.

    This technology uses regular existing phone lines, and has the
    ability to send data (pictures, audio files) at speeds up to 125
    times faster than analog modems.
     
    Jim Prather, Jul 4, 2003
    #9
  10. Spam me, please

     
    Bloated Elvis, Oct 18, 2003
    #10
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