what is good software to log keystrokes on my computer?

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by admyc, Aug 26, 2006.

  1. admyc

    Notan Guest

    Isn't that exactly what a keystroke/keylogger program does?

    Notan
     
    Notan, Aug 26, 2006
    #21
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  2. admyc

    Jim Watt Guest

    Yes, thats why I questioned it being 'spyware'

    However, I think its appropriate to call it unwanted software
    as its probably unwanted by the user of the machine although
    perhaps not by the owner depending on the circumstances.
     
    Jim Watt, Aug 26, 2006
    #22
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  3. admyc

    hammer1sj Guest

    It's a COMMERCIAL MONITORING PROGRAM. It cannot be installed remotely
    or by a person who doesn't have full access to target computer. Guess
    AV vendors aren't fair enough to classify it as malicious spyware or
    "unwanted program".

    By the way, please never think that it's detected by everything: if to
    install monitoring agent only, no security software (listed below or
    any other) will detect it.
     
    hammer1sj, Aug 28, 2006
    #23
  4. admyc

    ArtDent Guest

    True, if the OP was renting his comp out, but if it is for when a child is
    using it, then a parent has every right to keep 'tabs' on what they do.
    Whether they tell them ahead of time or not. Which is almost the _only_
    time a keylogger is alright in my personal opinion.
     
    ArtDent, Aug 28, 2006
    #24
  5. admyc

    admyc Guest

    No I am not. You cannot steal something from someone if you are not
    also depriving them of that thing, and as the person will not lose
    their password by me knowing it too I have not stolen it!
     
    admyc, Aug 28, 2006
    #25
  6. admyc

    Notan Guest

    Did you read the OP's latest?

    "You cannot steal something from someone if you are not also depriving them
    of that thing, and as the person will not lose their password by me knowing
    it too I have not stolen it!"

    Notan
     
    Notan, Aug 28, 2006
    #26
  7. From: <>

    | It's a COMMERCIAL MONITORING PROGRAM. It cannot be installed remotely
    | or by a person who doesn't have full access to target computer. Guess
    | AV vendors aren't fair enough to classify it as malicious spyware or
    | "unwanted program".
    |
    | By the way, please never think that it's detected by everything: if to
    | install monitoring agent only, no security software (listed below or
    | any other) will detect it.
    |

    No, but it will be. It has been submitted :)
     
    David H. Lipman, Aug 28, 2006
    #27
  8. admyc

    Rick Merrill Guest

    You are so full of shit I'll bet your eyes are brown. Ploink!
     
    Rick Merrill, Aug 28, 2006
    #28
  9. admyc

    Rick Merrill Guest

    Never heard of "intelectual property"?

    Oh, for you that's an oxymoron!
     
    Rick Merrill, Aug 29, 2006
    #29
  10. What about intrusion detection? What about security research?

    I have a daemon that logs all key-strokes and writes it to a file that is
    only readable as an admin. I read it from time to time. I draw conclusion
    about my very own behaviour, and alos about those who use my computer.
     
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Aug 29, 2006
    #30
  11. It is. It's a misleading analogy to material property imposed as a
    propaganda term by those who want to control our thoughts. Unlike material,
    ideas and generally information is non-exclusive and can be copied, so
    hardly any reasonable restrictions based on the properties of material
    objects are applicable to immaterial objects.

    Thus, in Germany we prefer the terms "immaterial goods" and "artworks".

    Anyway, why do you think that copyright is applicable to passwords?
     
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Aug 29, 2006
    #31
  12. Wonderful nonsense. Isn't it already stupid enough that three scanners
    don't correctly flag it as a legitimate, but also often misused software?

    Never minding that McAfee detects NMap as such a riskware, whereas it
    doesn't detect their very own port scanner software product?
     
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Aug 29, 2006
    #32
  13. admyc

    Notan Guest

    Just so we're clear, if someone takes my car during the night, while
    I'm sleeping, and returns it before I awake, it's not stealing?

    Notan
     
    Notan, Aug 29, 2006
    #33
  14. admyc

    Jim Watt Guest

    The 'thing' is called privacy.

    You wish to permanently deprive the owner of it, which is
    commonly known as theft.
     
    Jim Watt, Aug 29, 2006
    #34
  15. admyc

    nemo_outis Guest



    Sorry, he may be an privacy-invading asshole but he does understand what
    constitutes "theft" in the traditional legal sense. A key element of theft
    (larceny) is "asportation" - the carrying off of the goods depriving the
    rightful owner/possessor of them.

    There is a tendency in common speech to label many activities that don't
    have the element of asportation as theft: identity "theft," "theft" of
    intellectual property and so on. Such non-traditional extensions of the
    meaning of "theft" have even (to the detriment of the precision of the
    English language) crept into some lawmakers' statutes.

    The lawmakers may just be using the extended meaning of "theft"
    unreflectingly and sloppily, but many of the corporate types who hang
    labels of "piracy" or "theft" on what is only copyright infringement do so
    very consciously, hoping to piggyback on most folks sense of moral
    objection to theft in the traditional sense, blurring distinctions.

    Regards,
     
    nemo_outis, Aug 29, 2006
    #35
  16. admyc

    Nomen Nescio Guest

    Ironically enough it's not. At least not in most US jurisdictions, and
    probably many others including the US military UCMJ. If the thieves
    are caught before they return the vehicle they might be charged with
    theft, but even if they're able to prove they were on their way to
    return your car the official charges will likely read something like
    "Wrongful Appropriation of a Motor Vehicle".

    A completely different offense from stealing. :)
     
    Nomen Nescio, Aug 29, 2006
    #36
  17. admyc

    Notan Guest

    So, this is incorrect?

    http://dictionary.laborlawtalk.com/stealing

    Notan
     
    Notan, Aug 29, 2006
    #37
  18. admyc

    ArtDent Guest

    I did say 'almost'. These are obvious legitimate uses also. Although I
    am somewhat confused how a keylogger is supposed to help in intrusion
    detection. Intrusion = coming in from 'outside'.
    The question here would be, do those (others) that use your computer know
    that this logging is going on?
    If yes, where you (or your employer) have a specific _written_ policy,
    that each user is at least 'supposed' to read and know, then no problem.
    If no, where you (or your employer) have implemented this and not told the
    users, well... now you are getting into a very gray area indeed, this
    exact type of situation is working its way thru several court systems in
    the world right now.
     
    ArtDent, Aug 29, 2006
    #38
  19. admyc

    Jim Watt Guest

    Jim Watt, Aug 29, 2006
    #39
  20. Yeah, like keystrokes entered on the keyboard.
    There are no real "users", just "guests" on my system. I guess they should
    understand that my system can do whatever it wants, until explicitly stated
    otherwise. It might even do something I don't know, and I don't dare to
    make any real guarantees that it doesn't.

    I'm also logging network traffic from time to time, process starts and ends
    are written to the syslog, usage (and failures) of system privileges are
    logged as well.
     
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Aug 29, 2006
    #40
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