What happens when your builders understand nothing about optics

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Sep 2, 2013.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    RichA, Sep 2, 2013
    #1
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  2. pensive hamster, Sep 3, 2013
    #2
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  3. Ps, the architect has form:
    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/39403349/...y-vegas-hotel-pool-heats-guests/#.UiX3un-Nuew
    9/30/2010
    Las Vegas has a new hot spot — but it's not a nightclub.

    Guests at the new Vdara Hotel & Spa have complained that the glass
    skyscraper can magnify and reflect the sun's rays onto an area of the
    pool at temperatures hot enough to singe hair or melt plastic. It's a
    phenomenon that some hotel employees jokingly call the Vdara "death ray."
     
    pensive hamster, Sep 3, 2013
    #3
  4. RichA

    Sandman Guest

    Sandman, Sep 3, 2013
    #4
  5. RichA

    RichA Guest

    If it were truly parabolic and not (likely) spherical, it would be nearlyevaporating people who strayed into the beam.
     
    RichA, Sep 4, 2013
    #5
  6. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Yes, if you were at the foci of something that big, even if the reflectivity of the building were only partial, you'd probably burst into flame.
     
    RichA, Sep 4, 2013
    #6
  7. RichA

    Whisky-dave Guest

    That;s a lot of useful energy going to waste, why can't it be focused somewhere useful and collected as part of the build design.
     
    Whisky-dave, Sep 4, 2013
    #7
  8. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Architects build buildings for form and function and not to appease urban pseudo-environmentalists. At least, that's how they should design buildings..
     
    RichA, Sep 5, 2013
    #8
  9. RichA

    charles Guest

    charles, Sep 7, 2013
    #9
  10. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    Oh, holy crap. There's a text on solar engineering by the same guy who
    wrote the standard text on heat transfer. It tells how to do the
    calculations needed and has all the necessary tables as well. The
    "current elevation of the sun in the sky" in London is the same as it
    was this time last year and the year before and the one before that and
    on back through all of recorded history.

    And it points to an ongoing problem--architects are artists, not
    engineers.
     
    J. Clarke, Sep 7, 2013
    #10
  11. RichA

    Hactar Guest

    Yes, Murdoch owns it.
     
    Hactar, Sep 7, 2013
    #11
  12. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : In article <>,
    : says...
    : >
    : > On Mon, 2 Sep 2013 13:35:02 -0700 (PDT), RichA <>
    : > wrote:
    : >
    : > >There is a building like this in Toronto, but it faces north.
    : > >
    : > >http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-23930675
    : >
    : >
    : > It's the sun's fault
    : > http://www.theguardian.com/artandde...alkie-architect-predicted-reflection-sun-rays
    :
    : Oh, holy crap. There's a text on solar engineering by the same guy who
    : wrote the standard text on heat transfer. It tells how to do the
    : calculations needed and has all the necessary tables as well. The
    : "current elevation of the sun in the sky" in London is the same as it
    : was this time last year and the year before and the one before that and
    : on back through all of recorded history.
    :
    : And it points to an ongoing problem--architects are artists, not
    : engineers.

    This could be interesting to watch over time. The article says that the
    building in Las Vegas was coated to make it non-reflective. In that case more
    of the energy carried by the light will be converted to heat when it hits the
    building. (If it isn't being reflected, it has nowhere else to go.) Some of
    the heat will be lost via black-body radiation, but the rest will heat up the
    building and possibly overload its air conditioning system. Maybe they could
    coat the face of the building with solar panels and try to generate
    electricity. :^)

    I don't know how it is in the UK; but in the US, lawyers would be swarming
    over this like ants.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Sep 7, 2013
    #12
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