What day of the week is Jan 1st 1,000,000AD ?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Trevor Smith, Nov 4, 2003.

  1. Trevor Smith

    Trent C Guest

    There is nothing wrong with the "formula"...
    Well spotted, Ralph!

    OK, the rules say that a leap century only happens when the year is
    divisible by 400, so 1996 and 2000 were leap years, but not 97, 98 and 99.
    So we have 25 leap century years per 1,000 years, 25,000 in 1,000,000 and
    for our calculation, 24,950 (we're starting the count at the year 2000 not 0
    and we remove 2 millennia-worth - 50).

    That makes our total after division 52,006,492.85. A thought, though: does
    your earlier decimal formula account for a starting day of Saturday for Jan
    1st 2000?
     
    Trent C, Nov 5, 2003
    #41
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  2. Trevor Smith

    anthonyberet Guest

    Ralph Mann wrote:
    How do you know how many days are involved?
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    anthonyberet, Nov 5, 2003
    #42
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  3. Trevor Smith

    anthonyberet Guest

    I think you need to drop the word "else" from your post.
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    anthonyberet, Nov 5, 2003
    #43
  4. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Trent C said:
    Er, no it calculates based on the very first week day being Monday.
    If you are going to use Saturday as *your* starting point, then my formula would
    be used with Saturday as the first day.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #44
  5. Trevor Smith

    anthonyberet Guest

    Ralph Mann wrote:
    Yes there is.
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    anthonyberet, Nov 5, 2003
    #45
  6. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    anthonyberet said:
    Involved in what?
    The total number of elapsed days, or the number of days in a week?
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #46
  7. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    anthonyberet said:
    Ok picky, but where are your contributions to the thread?
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #47
  8. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Ralph Mann said:
    I must add here that you are out by 2 days according to this
    http://www.geocities.com/eu84/frtop_files/calendar.htm
    as your calculation comes up with Thursday.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #48
  9. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    anthonyberet said:
    Whatever.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #49
  10. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Ralph Mann said:
    Actually, if you stay with using Monday as the first day and not Saturday, your
    calculation is correct, and the day shows as Saturday as per the above link.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #50
  11. Trevor Smith

    Trent C Guest

    There is nothing wrong with the "formula"...
    Righto, that makes my earlier suggestion of Friday wrong on two counts (any
    more offers?)! To quote your decimal formula and add the alteration for a
    Jan 1st 2000 startpoint:
    ..142857142 = Monday Saturday
    ..285714285 = Tuesday Sunday
    ..428571428 = Wednesday Monday
    ..571428571 = Thursday Tuesday
    ..714285714 = Friday Wednesday
    ..857142857 = Saturday Thursday
    ..0 = Sunday Friday

    This now suggests Thursday as an answer. Ralph, you seem to be the only
    person who's actually looking at the formula - what do you think?
     
    Trent C, Nov 5, 2003
    #51
  12. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Trent C said:
    See my last post to you, as if you continue to use Monday as the first day of
    the week, your calculation arrives at Saturday which is correct according to the
    link I gave in that same post.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #52
  13. Trevor Smith

    Trent C Guest

    I calculated on the basis of a 365 day year, and a leap year of
    every 4
    Hang on Ralph, did I miss something? If you look at the decimal formula I
    copied from your earlier post, you'll see I added a new set of days,
    starting on Saturday, thus my final calculation, with a decimal of .85,
    suggests Thursday.
     
    Trent C, Nov 5, 2003
    #53
  14. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Trent C said:
    You don't need to remove 50 here, as you aren't using the first 1999 years in
    your calculation, however you need to add 1 as you are using 2000 as a starting
    point, but then again, I don't remember 2000 actually getting that extra day to
    make it a 367 day year.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #54
  15. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Ralph Mann said:
    Er, 2 because 2000 was also a leap year.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #55
  16. Trevor Smith

    Trent C Guest

    There is nothing wrong with the "formula"...
    Surely, though, since we're basing our calculations on 1,000,000 years, and
    we're starting at AD 2000, we have to allow for those years somewhere, don't
    we?

    And the year 2000 had 366 years - a full leap year - unlike 1900, 1800 and
    1700 (please ignore my error in the earlier post).

    Oh god, my head's beginning to hurt!
     
    Trent C, Nov 5, 2003
    #56
  17. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Trent C said:

    No, because you are leaving them out of the calculation and using Sat 1 Jan 2000
    as day 1.
    And yes, as Saturday would be the first day of the week, then your change to the
    decimal correlation would be correct.
    I am only getting confused by the distinction/inclusion of a leap year and a
    leap century.
    Every 4th year from 2000 would have an extra day, and every century divisible by
    400 would also have an extra day.
    Based on that, years like 2000, 2400, 2800 etc would have 2 extra days, 1 for
    the 4 year cycle and 1 for the 400 year cycle.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #57
  18. Trevor Smith

    Trent C Guest

    Trent C, Nov 5, 2003
    #58
  19. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Trent C said:
    Just goes to show how those using fancy methods can screw it up and get away
    with it ;-)
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #59
  20. Trevor Smith

    Trent C Guest

    Not quite, Ralph. A leap century (2000 for example) has, like a leap year,
    366 days instead of the regulation 365. The distinction is that the century
    years not divisible by 400 (1900, 1800, 1700, for example) are normal
    365-day affairs.
     
    Trent C, Nov 5, 2003
    #60
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