What day of the week is Jan 1st 1,000,000AD ?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Trevor Smith, Nov 4, 2003.

  1. Trevor Smith

    anthonyberet Guest

    Unfortunately, The Earth's rotation is slowing down, and I am afraid it
    might not slow down evenly.
    This means it will be very tricky to work out the number of days in a year
    in the distant future :(
    http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/topstory/2003/0210rotation.html
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    anthonyberet
     
    anthonyberet, Nov 5, 2003
    #21
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  2. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    anthonyberet said:
    That still makes no difference to the basic calculation of 7 days in a week.
    It won't matter if there are 360 or 500 days in a year, there are only 7 days in
    a week.
    The question was to find out the weekday.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #22
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  3. Trevor Smith

    Trent C Guest

    1,000,000 x 365 days, plus 250,000 days, minus 365 days, divide the
    total
    Did you remember to include leap centuries (the next one being, for example,
    2400, but not 2100, 2200 or 2300)? And since we're going that far ahead and
    we all know that the leap year system doesn't completely address the
    rotational differential, you have to consider a leap millennium...
     
    Trent C, Nov 5, 2003
    #23
  4. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Trent C said:
    Aren't the details of what I used to calculate clear enough?
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #24
  5. Trevor Smith

    bb3 Guest

    I went here... http://www.geocities.com/eu84/frtop_files/calendar.htm
    and got a Saturday for the Gregorian calendar and Sunday for the Julian
    calendar.
     
    bb3, Nov 5, 2003
    #25
  6. Trevor Smith

    Trent C Guest

    1,000,000 x 365 days, plus 250,000 days, minus 365 days, divide the
    total
    I didn't see any allowance for leap centuries in your calculation.
     
    Trent C, Nov 5, 2003
    #26
  7. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Trent C said:
    Maybe that's because I didn't allow for them.
    I used what you can see I used.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #27
  8. Trevor Smith

    Trent C Guest

    1,000,000 x 365 days, plus 250,000 days, minus 365 days, divide
    the
    My other comments about leap millennia was conjectural, but leap centuries
    are not.

    I suggest, therefore, that your formula is incorrect.
     
    Trent C, Nov 5, 2003
    #28
  9. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Trent C said:
    Which formula would that be? Dividing whatever number you come up with by 7?
    Seeing as you are so bright, why don't you come up with some figures of your own
    that show the correct "result".
    There is nothing wrong with the "formula", only my "result" is incorrect, as I
    have omitted some "data".
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #29
  10. Trevor Smith

    anthonyberet Guest

    Ralph Mann wrote:
    er.. yes but how many weeks will be in each of the years between now and the
    year 1,000,000?
    You need to find out how many days will pass in order to work out the number
    of full weeks and any additional days to find the weekday.

    Without the total number of days and weeks, you can't do it.
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    anthonyberet, Nov 5, 2003
    #30
  11. Trevor Smith

    anthonyberet Guest

    You used incorrect data as well
    The number of days that will elapse between now and 1,000,000 AD is probably
    not 365,249,635 days.
    The number of days (or weeks) is unknowable, as the Earth's rotation is
    slowing down unevenly.
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    Put "usenet" in the subject-line if you want to mail me, otherwise it will
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    anthonyberet, Nov 5, 2003
    #31
  12. Trevor Smith

    Giovanni Guest

    But you use the number of days per year to get to the weekday so that
    does matter.
     
    Giovanni, Nov 5, 2003
    #32
  13. Trevor Smith

    Liz Guest

    Cornelius: As you wish, you big doo-doo head.

    -- Escape From the City of the Apes
     
    Liz, Nov 5, 2003
    #33
  14. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Giovanni said:
    No, you use the total number of days elapsed.
    It doesn't matter how many days in a month, or in a year, it's the total number
    of days that count.
    But the bottom line is, no matter what the amount, the formula used to work out
    the week day is * divide by 7*
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #34
  15. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Liz said:
    Er...excuse me, but I don't see anybody else coming up with precise
    figures/calculations to give the answer to the question.
    Actually, I don't see anybody else coming up with *any* figures/calculations.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #35
  16. Trevor Smith

    Trent C Guest

    There is nothing wrong with the "formula"...
    figures/calculations.

    Ralph, that no one else comes up with a formula doesn't mean that yours is,
    by default, correct. And our not having created one doesn't stop us from
    observing a gap in the one which you have put together (and put together
    better than any attempt I might make, by the way, albeit incomplete).

    Don't take it personally - this isn't a challenge to you personally, rather
    part of the iterative process which will get to a complete formula.
     
    Trent C, Nov 5, 2003
    #36
  17. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Trent C said:
    It is too easy to tell someone they are wrong and not bother to give an example.

    I calculated on the basis of a 365 day year, and a leap year of every 4 years.
    There is nothing *wrong* with that.

    Ok, I will take it that extra step.
    1,000,000 x 365 = 365,000,000
    1,000,000 x 0.25 = 250,000 (number of leap years)
    1,000,000 x 0.0025 = 2500 (number of leap centuries)
    minus 366 to bring the total forward from Dec 31 to Jan 1

    = 52178876.285714

    Answer = Tuesday.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #37
  18. Trevor Smith

    Trent C Guest

    There is nothing wrong with the "formula"...
    Without commenting on the formula, I wonder if it might not be smarter to
    start from a known point. For example, we know that January 1st 2000 was a
    Saturday, so...

    1,000,000 years less 2,000 is 998,000 years.
    Multiply by 365 days = 364,270,000
    Less leap years (249,500) = 364,020,500
    Plus those pesky leap centuries (29,940) = 364,050,440

    .... should take us to December 31st 999,999. If we then divide the sum by 7
    we get 52,007,05.71, which by Ralph's excellent previous work suggests a
    Friday.

    Having said that, I'd be extremely grateful if someone could check my
    workings and make sure I haven't made some dreadful error.
     
    Trent C, Nov 5, 2003
    #38
  19. Trevor Smith

    Ralph Mann Guest

    Trent C said:
    29,940 leap centuries ?
    There are only 25,000 leap centuries in the full 1,000,000 years.
     
    Ralph Mann, Nov 5, 2003
    #39
  20. Trevor Smith

    Liz Guest

    Zira: Cornelius, why do you insist on provoking him?

    Cornelius: No creature can survive in the Forbidden Zone.
    I know, I've been there, I've seen it!

    http://www.worldoflongmire.com/features/apes/planet5/planet5.html
     
    Liz, Nov 5, 2003
    #40
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