what are "runts" packets ?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by PJML, Jul 17, 2003.

  1. PJML

    PJML Guest

    They're basically packets which arrived incomplete for
    some reason - usually they are too-short.
     
    PJML, Jul 17, 2003
    #1
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  2. a packet smaller than 64 bytes, is considered as a runt packet and is
    ignored as too small.
     
    [email protected], Jul 17, 2003
    #2
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  3. PJML

    someone Guest

    hello everybody,

    I have a problem with a port on a cisco 2950 switch :

    38062 packets input, 6125735 bytes
    Received 26 broadcasts, 3412 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
    3503 input errors, 56 CRC, 35 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
    0 watchdog, 0 multicast


    I don't know what "runts" packets are, can somebody help me ?

    thanks in advance.
     
    someone, Jul 17, 2003
    #3
  4. PJML

    John Agosta Guest

    I think that's "less than 64 bits"




     
    John Agosta, Jul 17, 2003
    #4
  5. PJML

    Rich Blum Guest

    Runt packets are packets that are less than the minimum packet
    size (64 bytes for Ethernet). They often occur due to collisions on
    the line. On switches the cause is usually a mis-matched duplex
    problem (full on one end and half on the other) caused by bad
    autodetection of a device. Try "hard coding" the duplex to either full
    or half on one or both ends and see if the problem goes away. We have
    had lots of issues with bad NIC cards and/or drivers that cause this.
    Sometimes upgrading the NIC driver helps. Hope this helps solve your
    problem.

    Rich Blum - Author
    "Network Performance Open Source Toolkit" (Wiley)
    http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471433012.html
     
    Rich Blum, Jul 17, 2003
    #5
  6. PJML

    liminas_LTU Guest

    Looks like you need to check cables (CRC, Frame, input indicates);
    test it by Fluke2000, Agilent WireScope, ... to certify network
    cabling. Cable become Cat5e only after certification, it's not enough
    to only to by cables and parts that have Cat5e stamp.
     
    liminas_LTU, Jul 17, 2003
    #6
  7. PJML

    Steve Guest

    "Runts" are packets smaller than 64k.
     
    Steve, Jul 17, 2003
    #7
  8. :"Runts" are packets smaller than 64k.

    Not unless the missing unit afterwards is the "microbyte".
     
    Walter Roberson, Jul 17, 2003
    #8
  9. PJML

    Dave Pooser Guest

    Nope, it's <64 bytes, which is the same thing as 512 bits. <64 bits
    ouldn't even include source and destination MAC addresses. That
    wouldn't be a runt, that would be a munchkin.
     
    Dave Pooser, Jul 17, 2003
    #9
  10. Wouldn't that be "millibyte?"

    * I couldn't resist *

    - Michael


    Houghton.
     
    Michael T. Hall, Jul 18, 2003
    #10
  11. PJML

    John Agosta Guest

    That munchkin line was funny !
     
    John Agosta, Jul 18, 2003
    #11
  12. ||> In article <>,
    |> :"Runts" are packets smaller than 64k.

    |> Not unless the missing unit afterwards is the "microbyte".

    |Wouldn't that be "millibyte?"

    |* I couldn't resist *

    Okay, ya caught me.

    Some, though, would insist that the proper unit would be "mibibyte",
    symbol miB.

    http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
     
    Walter Roberson, Jul 18, 2003
    #12
  13. PJML

    CCIE8122 Guest

    or millibyte, rather.

    kr
     
    CCIE8122, Jul 21, 2003
    #13
  14. PJML

    buzz27

    Joined:
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    a runt is a frame less than 64 bytes

    Basically the information isnt getting through,,,Causes are usually something due to bad cables, bad ports or bad nic card....usually fixing one of the 3 fix the issue....
     
    buzz27, Dec 26, 2011
    #14
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