WDS mode - would this work?

Discussion in 'Home Networking' started by rainandsnow, Jun 20, 2007.

  1. rainandsnow

    rainandsnow Guest

    I run a wireless network using a Buffalo Air Station wireless router -
    which has WDS mode.

    I want to extend my network to a location 150 meters away in another
    building.

    I don't really understand WDS, but if I connect up my current router to
    a hi gain external aerial, buy another Buffalo router with WDS mode and
    put it in the remote location (also with a hi gain external aerial) -
    Would it extend the network to the remote location so that laptops with
    wifi cards could be used there? - or is there a better way of doing it?
     
    rainandsnow, Jun 20, 2007
    #1
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  2. rainandsnow

    Devs Guest

    Don't know that another router will work that an access point will. I'm
    not familiar with the Buffalo kit. Does it have WDS + AP mode? The
    trouble with high gain ext ae's is they are also very directional so
    your coverage will be poor to unusable at the far end. In which case you
    might need 2 APs. One for the wireless bridge and one to redistribute
    but this does slow stuff down a lot.
     
    Devs, Jun 20, 2007
    #2
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  3. rainandsnow

    rainandsnow Guest


    The one I have is, apparently a "Broadband router access point". It has
    a facility to enable wireless bridging and also to enable WDS Dedicated
    Mode.

    I don't see any problem with the antenna - if I stick a 9db one I
    already have out the window, I can pick it up with a laptop at the
    remote location, so was thinking that something acting as a repeater
    there coupled with a similar antenna should be OK.

    You say I might need 2 APs at the far end - I don't understand . . . Am
    I wrong in assuming that WDS mode means the Buffalo will be acting as a
    bridge and also doing the redistribution??

    My reason for wanting to stick with Buffalo is that the router/AP I have
    is rated at 125 Mbps - but only with other Buffalos IIRC. I know I won't
    achieve that speed, but was hoping to get twice what I'd get with a non
    Buffalo product.
     
    rainandsnow, Jun 20, 2007
    #3
  4. rainandsnow

    me2 Guest

    rainandsnow,

    Yes it will work. If you want confirmation and more help post the
    question to:

    alt.internet.wireless

    regards

    nemo2
     
    me2, Jun 20, 2007
    #4
  5. rainandsnow

    Lurch Guest

    Surely that group is about wireless internet?
     
    Lurch, Jun 20, 2007
    #5
  6. rainandsnow

    Jon Guest

    declared for all the world to
    hear...
    A bog standard wireless access point on the end of a mains electricity
    networking plug.
     
    Jon, Jun 21, 2007
    #6
  7. rainandsnow

    rainandsnow Guest


    OK, thanks. Will probably give it a try and post again if stuck.
     
    rainandsnow, Jun 21, 2007
    #7
  8. rainandsnow

    rainandsnow Guest


    The remote location uses a different phase for its mains electricity.
     
    rainandsnow, Jun 21, 2007
    #8
  9. rainandsnow

    Devs Guest

    Do you have a link to the specs? It's just that the kit I have used that
    uses WDS (D-Link) appears to do it differently. I can't see that using a
    second router would work unless all of its routey bit were turned off in
    WDS dedicated mode.
    yes this will work with omni directional aerials provided the signal you
    get _is_ definitely strong enough at the remote location.
    WDS + AP mode provides this functionality. Don't know about WDS as
    applied to this particular Buffalo kit. The point I was trying to make
    is that, to get a reliable signal over that kind of distance a
    directional antenna has to be used. Using a directional antenna to
    redistribute the signal doesn't work - it just beams it back where it
    has come from! Connecting to a 2nd AP cures this but slows things down
    for the end users.
    Ah. Multi channel hogging proprietary psuedo standards. If you want
    reliability stick with the current standards i.e 802.11g.
     
    Devs, Jun 21, 2007
    #9
  10. rainandsnow

    rainandsnow Guest


    The support page is here:
    http://www.buffalotech.com/support/downloads/
    They seem to be listed by type rather than by model number which makes
    comparisons difficult.

    I can't find a download for the router I've got, however the more recent
    ones or at least some of them seem to have a physical switch to switch
    between router mode and AP mode. Mine doesn't, it has WDS and WDS
    dedicated mode in the menu.



    Oh dear. I didn't know that.
     
    rainandsnow, Jun 22, 2007
    #10
  11. rainandsnow

    Jon Guest

    declared for all the world to
    hear...
    Ok, scotch that idea then!
     
    Jon, Jun 22, 2007
    #11
  12. rainandsnow

    me2 Guest

    Lurch,

    WDS is used with wireless routers and can be used to bridge 2 wireless
    access points or to configure access points as repeaters. See this
    Draytek article for more info:

    http://www.draytek.co.uk/support/kb_wlan_wds.html

    regards

    nemo2
     
    me2, Jun 22, 2007
    #12
  13. rainandsnow

    Lurch Guest

    I know. A wireless router isn't wireless internet though, it's a
    wireless network that just happens to be connected to the internet
    somehow. Wireless internet wouldn't work on a laptop with just an
    802.11n card in for example.
     
    Lurch, Jun 25, 2007
    #13
  14. rainandsnow

    rainandsnow Guest


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HomePNA is about a system of using two
    phone wires to create a computer network:

    "Home PNA 3.0 offers 128 Mbit/s, which should be sufficient for most
    needs. This can be increased to 240 Mbit/s for those with high data rate
    requirements."

    I've gone ahead with buying a second Buffalo router for the remote
    location and it works well as both an access point (connected to the
    remote computer by ethernet cable) and as a wi-fi repeater, but the HPNA
    solution sounds very attractive.

    I wonder why this is not used more and why adapters seem difficult to find.
     
    rainandsnow, Jun 30, 2007
    #14
  15. rainandsnow

    JohnW Guest

    Because Cat5e cable is about the same order of cost as phone
    cable? The real costs are for the installation, which is the
    same for both cases, so using "industry standard" networking
    is the better choice. Volume production makes things cheaper,
    causing interim solutions to be bypassed.
     
    JohnW, Jun 30, 2007
    #15
  16. rainandsnow

    rainandsnow Guest


    I'm probably showing my ignorance here, but I think you are talking
    about ethernet. If so, am I wrong in thinking that around 100 meters is
    the limit for it??
     
    rainandsnow, Jun 30, 2007
    #16
  17. rainandsnow

    Lurch Guest

    That is the official limit if you are installing a structured cabling
    system to a standard. You can get it to work over much longer
    distances though in practice, it's mostly down to how you install it.
     
    Lurch, Jul 1, 2007
    #17
  18. rainandsnow

    Devs Guest

    The 100m limit is down to timing. After that it takes too long for a
    signal to travel the length of the cable. You can squeeze a bit of extra
    length by changing to half duplex and dropping the speed to 10Mbs. I
    know people that boast that they can get 160m out of ethernet but IME is
    not worth the hassle. It's not reliable and I wouldn't have any
    confidence in it whatsoever.
     
    Devs, Jul 2, 2007
    #18
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