VPN .... how do you connect?

Discussion in 'Home Networking' started by Tx2, Jun 22, 2005.

  1. Tx2

    Tx2 Guest

    I'm 'experimenting' with VPN back to my home PC for my laptop when i'm out
    an about and have dynamic IP internet access.
    Is this possible, in the first instance, and assuming i've set up my 834G
    router correctly, how do i initiate the connection back to my home PC?

    For example ...

    I'm 'somewhere' where I do have internet access, perhaps dialup, but most
    likely broadband on a router based LAN setup.

    I want to connect to my home PC via the VPN i've set up on my router, but my
    IP address from the LAN I'm on is DHCP, so I want to log into my own PC as a
    user as the IP address is unlikely to be the same as I would hope if I set
    up IP acess on the VPN ... i've set up user and key access.

    OK, so i've lost myself now, so if anyone wants to stick their head in and
    help me out ... !!
     
    Tx2, Jun 22, 2005
    #1
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  2. Tx2

    Tx2 Guest

    In
    OK, what do i actually need to do on my laptop to hook into my VPN ? ....
    with my home network, i have shortcut icons on the desktop for the various
    shares on the network. i click those, and assuming the networked PC is on
    the network, it takes me into the shared resource.

    With a VPN, I am not going to have this, am i (?) so, how do i initiate the
    VPN so that my laptop says "ah, he wants to connect to his VPN at home"...
    ??

    I hope that is clearer?
     
    Tx2, Jun 22, 2005
    #2
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  3. Your ISP gives you a different numeric IP address each time you connect,
    so you need some sort of fixed address which always points to your
    current numeric address. There are a number of Dynamic DNS (DDNS)
    services, free and paid; e.g., no-ip. Every time you get a new address,
    the DDNS service informs all the DNS servers around the world; this
    takes a few minutes.

    Now that you know that this exists, Google should tell you everything
    you need.

    HTH,
     
    Michael Salem, Jun 22, 2005
    #3
  4. Tx2

    Tx2 Guest

    In
    OK, but if i'm sitting behind someone elses router, on someone else's LAN, i
    can't get such, can i? and therefore am I not able to VPN into my machine?
    Your answer suggests to me, that VPN relies on each 'end' having
    pre-determined settings so that each machine knows where the other is coming
    from.

    If I can find out the WAN IP of the router to which i'm connected (not
    difficult) then am i able to log into a DNS service and inform it 'where' i
    am?

    If indeed I can have such as you describe when dialling in, or connecting
    via a 192.168.*.* router'd network, then Google will as likely herald many
    answers I seek.
     
    Tx2, Jun 22, 2005
    #4
  5. Tx2

    Clint Sharp Guest

    Not the case unless you've set your home router to accept connections
    from a set list of remote IP addresses and the one you're using isn't on
    the list. The IP address of the machine you are using doesn't matter,
    the VPN client will appear to be a new network adapter to the system and
    it will have an IP address allocated by your router for the time that
    the connection is 'up'. Obviously the router you are trying to connect
    from has to allow the relevant ports to be opened.
    It can be set up this way, indeed it's an extra layer of security that
    is very cheap to implement.
    Think you've missed the point of the DDNS service, it's to allow you to
    access your machine even though it might have been assigned a different
    IP address to the one you *think* it has. The service doesn't need to
    know what IP address you are trying to access your PC from it just needs
    to know what address your home PC has, this is all done automatically
    for you.
     
    Clint Sharp, Jun 22, 2005
    #5
  6. Tx2

    Jon Guest

    declared for all the world to hear...
    I'm investigating this myself currently. I don't think it matters where
    you are coming from as long as you can see the internet and as long as
    you know the WAN IP of the router you are VPN-ing too, and as long as
    that router has the capability to terminate a VPN connection.

    If your router does not have the ability to act as an VPN server then
    you will require a software or hardware based solution.

    Once the VPN link is established, the computer you are VPN-ing from will
    be assigned a 192.168.x x IP and behave as if it were on the LAN behind
    the router you VPN'd to.

    I think!

    The problem I have is that my router will pass VPN traffic but does not
    act as a VPN server so I think I will require some expensive software or
    hardware to make it work.
     
    Jon, Jun 22, 2005
    #6
  7. Tx2

    Tx2 Guest

    In
    well, i'm as lost as you are TBH ... Googling is just making it worse!
    i don't *need* a VPN, but i'd like to be able to accomplish it ... i'm sure
    it's very easy when you know how. I just wish i knew how!

    I can set up my router for VPN .... i have set up routers for remote
    management of the router, and can log in to them to see what's what, but i
    want to be able to log into folders and get 'stuff', going beyond the router
    stage that i'm currently at.
     
    Tx2, Jun 22, 2005
    #7
  8. Tx2

    Clint Sharp Guest

    XP Pro will accept an incoming VPN connection and allow you to browse
    your network.
     
    Clint Sharp, Jun 22, 2005
    #8
  9. Tx2

    Jon Guest

    declared for all the world to hear...
    How?

    Or, where do I find out how?
     
    Jon, Jun 23, 2005
    #9
  10. Tx2

    Dean Jarratt Guest

    Step 1: You need a VPN server...Whether or not this is a router capable
    of acting as a VPN server, or a Domain Controller (NT, 2000, XP Pro etc).
    The VPN server gives you as the client an IP address for the local
    network. The client will create a virtual interface with the IP address
    given from the VPN server. You will then have 2 IP addresses.

    Step 2: You need to know the IP address of the VPN server to connect to
    it. If this is a static IP address it won't change, if it's dynamic
    you'll need to know what it is before you can connect.

    Step 3:- If you are using a VPN server which is behind a NAT router, then
    you need to enable port forwarding on the router to allow VPN traffic to
    reach the server.
     
    Dean Jarratt, Jun 23, 2005
    #10
  11. Tx2

    Tx2 Guest

    In
    ditto.

    if i'm sitting in an office somewhere, and i want to access my machine at
    home via a VPN, i'm still totally and utterly lost as to how to achieve it!
    i've Googled, hell I even Yahoo'd ..... are there any very easy to follow
    guides explaing not only what you have to do, but why such and such is done,
    the latter so I can understand better what it is i'm actually doing?
     
    Tx2, Jun 23, 2005
    #11
  12. Tx2

    Tx2 Guest

    In
    how does the VPN server give out this IP? How do I initiate contact with my
    router/machine in the first instance?
    It's static. My ISP provides a static IP.
    So what do I now do with it?
    I'm using a NAT router, but isn't that the VPN server? See, it's becoming
    obvious I know so little about this.
    If it isn't, and XP is, then yes, it is behind a NAT router .... so which
    ports do i assign, are there any specific ones?

    .....is there a step 4 ... ??

    Yes, i need my hand holding/spoon feeding etc .... please don't shoot me
    ..... i'm trying to learn.

    So, i have (assumed) set up the router (or XP) for VPN, and i'm now sitting
    out and about somewhere, anywhere - airport departures, client office, my
    mates house [1] - and i want to VPN to my PC back at home to maybe pick up a
    file or a document I need ..... is this step 4?

    I really don't understand, sorry to be acting kinda thick, but Googling
    isn't helping as i haven't got much of a clue (shall i stop there....) about
    what I'm really looking for.

    TIA

    [1] i presume you can VPN from any machine so long as you tell it where to
    connect to, and that the router is set to receive such.
     
    Tx2, Jun 23, 2005
    #12
  13. Tx2

    Dean Jarratt Guest

    Step 4 would be connect to the internet, however you can. Create a new
    network connection using the wizard within XP. One of the options is to
    connect to a VPN, the wizard asks such things as the VPN server IP
    address, and any authentication that you need such as username and
    password.

    You need to configure the VPN server to hand out IP addresses. I can't
    give details unless you're using a VPN server I'm familiar with.

    I'm not sure of the make/model of router you have at home, but I'm
    assuming that it's an ADSL modem router, which has VPN passthru
    capability but is not actually a VPN server, or it may have the
    capability of being a host to host VPN, which isn't what you're looking
    to do.

    What'll you need to provide for a walkthru on this is the following:-

    The OS that your home PC is running.
    The make/model of your router at home.
    The OS that your remote PC is running.
     
    Dean Jarratt, Jun 23, 2005
    #13
  14. Q1: if i'm sitting in an office somewhere, and I want to access my
    machine at
    home via a VPN, i'm still totally and utterly lost as to how to achieve
    it!
    i've Googled, hell I even Yahoo'd ..... are there any very easy to
    follow
    guides explaining not only what you have to do, but why such and such is
    done,
    the latter so I can understand better what it is i'm actually doing?


    Q2: how does the VPN server give out this IP? How do I initiate contact
    with my
    router/machine in the first instance?

    A2: I posted the answer in this thread recently:

    Subject: Re: VPN .... how do you connect?
    Your ISP gives you a different numeric IP address each time you connect,
    so you need some sort of fixed address which always points to your
    current numeric address. There are a number of Dynamic DNS (DDNS)
    services, free and paid; e.g., no-ip. Every time you get a new address,
    the DDNS service informs all the DNS servers around the world; this
    takes a few minutes.

    Now that you know that this exists, Google should tell you everything
    you need.
    ============

    A1: You have a number of options. The details here assume you're running
    Microsoft Windows, but the general idea is the same for other OpSys's.
    Once you have established a VPN connection:

    1. you proceed exactly as you would if the two machines were connected
    over a LAN. For example, you can set up password-protected file sharing
    with WinXP Pro to send files from machine to machine.

    2. You can run remote-control software which allows you to work at the
    remote machine exactly as if you were sitting at the host machine. Good
    free software to do this and transfer files: UltraVNC. You run UltraVNC
    server on the host; on the remote machine you can run UltraVNC viewer,
    or even use a Web browser. With a Web browser you can't exchange files.


    In general, if you are connected via a VPN, it is exactly the same as if
    the machines are connected together via a LAN. You can use UltraVNC (or
    some other remote control software) to allow one machine on a LAN to
    control another.

    HTH,
     
    Michael Salem, Jun 23, 2005
    #14
  15. Tx2

    poster Guest

    No, that's perhaps the 'wrong way round'. Many users have a fixed IP at
    home, on their ADSL connection, and the 'dynamic IP internet access' (if
    I'm assuming correctly) is down to that of the laptop from wherever the
    OP is at the time he wants to connect back to his fixed IP.

    Clearly it hasn't. On the laptop, he'll need to use something like the
    MS Technet article 314076 (which will allow him to use the laptop as
    a VPN client). I just found http://www.pctechnicians.ca/help/XPVPN.html
    which describes using the Win XP Pro machine as a VPN server. Clearly a
    few firewall or router (port forwarding) experiments may be needed after
    doing so, and there are articles on MS Technet about securing resources.
     
    poster, Jun 23, 2005
    #15
  16. I'm 'experimenting' with VPN back to my home PC for my laptop when i'm outposter commented:
    The original posting was not very clear (fair enough, by the time you
    can formulate the precise question, you nearly know the answer). A great
    many people don't have static IP addresses. If you are trying to connect
    to a host, the IP address of the host is all-important; that of the
    remote user is irrelevant. In this case DDNS is virtually the only way
    to go.
    If the problem was simply what address to use to connect from the remote
    computer to the host, Googling for "DDNS" or "DDNS no-ip" will be very
    informative. If it's a matter of how to set up a VPN server under WinXP,
    and to set up a client to connect to it, the references you gave (see
    below) would be very helpful. Another useful search term is WOWN.
    I hope that what you and I have posted helps the OP and anyone who needs
    to make a VPN connection.

    HTH,
     
    Michael Salem, Jun 23, 2005
    #16
  17. Tx2

    Clint Sharp Guest

    Well, google is your friend but it's;
    Make new connection in network connections.
    Select Advanced connection,
    Accept Incoming Connections
    Click next on the 'Devices for Incoming Connections' page
    Allow Virtual Private Connections
    Select users
    Finish

    Don't forget to open port 1723, enable VPN passthrough and Protocol Type
    47 (GRE) on your router and set up a port mapping on the router to the
    machine hosting the Incoming VPN connection.

    There are a couple of good walkthroughs on the web for setting up XP VPN
    connections, they detail setting up both ends.
     
    Clint Sharp, Jun 23, 2005
    #17
  18. Tx2

    David Rance Guest

    I've just set up a VPN server on my desktop using that article but
    Properties->General tells me that "No hardware capable of accepting
    calls is installed." So what hardware do I need? I have a recent LAN
    card which works fine. What else do I need?

    David
     
    David Rance, Jun 24, 2005
    #18
  19. Tx2

    Martin Guest

    Hi,

    You can make all this a lot simpler.

    Go to www.logmein.com

    They offer a free service, which is trivially simple to set up. It lets you
    operate your PC from anywhere with a connection. You simply run their client
    itlity on the client PC and it does all the thinky bit for you. My home PC
    is behind a software firewall and a router, and I can access it from my LAN
    at work, or indeed my Pocket PC from anywhere.

    You have to buy the pro version if you want to transfer files, but I just
    email them to wherever I am..

    HTH

    Martin
     
    Martin, Jun 24, 2005
    #19
  20. Tx2

    Tx2 Guest

    In
    XP Pro
    Netgear DG834G Wireless
    XP Pro
     
    Tx2, Jun 24, 2005
    #20
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