[Vodafone NZ] Dial-up screwed for whole day

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Your Name, Feb 21, 2014.

  1. Your Name

    Your Name Guest

    For the best part of 24 hours (20-22 February, 2014), Vodafone NZ
    screwed up their dial-up service so badly that users trying to connect
    only got a busy signal or a recorded "your call cannot be connected"
    message. As always, although now fixed (and anyone's guess how long it
    wil last this time since it has happened before), absolutely no mention
    of this fiasco on the so called Network Status page.
     
    Your Name, Feb 21, 2014
    #1
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  2. Your Name

    Enkidu Guest

    What is "dial-up"?

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Feb 21, 2014
    #2
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  3. Your Name

    Your Name Guest

    It's what sensible people use when they don't want to pay the
    over-bloated prices for broadband. :p
     
    Your Name, Feb 21, 2014
    #3
  4. Your Name

    Enkidu Guest

    That's no answer. What is it? Is it stealing your neighbour's WiFi?

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Feb 22, 2014
    #4
  5. Your Name

    Ralph Fox Guest

    Dial-up is defined by having to "dial up" or connect to one's Internet
    provider. Like for example my 7.2Mb/s MBB (mobile broadband) dial-up
    connection (which has an internal number of *99# to "dial" and open an
    Internet session via my Internet provider's SGSN/GGSN). "Dial-up" is
    the opposite of having an Internet connection which is intrinsically
    permanently on.

    Back in the BBS days of the 1980s, dial-up was usually (a) at speeds
    of 300b/s, 1200b/s or 2400b/s, and (b) over fixed-line copper wire.
    Thanks to technological advances, dial-up is (a) no longer limited to
    these speeds, and (b) can run over radio networks.

    HTH HAND
     
    Ralph Fox, Feb 22, 2014
    #5
  6. Your Name

    Your Name Guest

    No, all dial-up users in New Zealand have plugged a long cable into
    your modem and steal your Internet connection. It's the long distances
    that cause it to be slower for us, so hurry up and get a high-speed
    fibre connection. :p
     
    Your Name, Feb 22, 2014
    #6
  7. Your Name

    Your Name Guest

    He knows, he's just being an idiot.


    Technically most broadband plans aren't even "permanently on". The
    broadband "modem" gets a new IP address whenever you start using it
    again after a break. To have a permanent connection and IP address
    usually costs more.


    Like all "modems", the speeds are theoretical. My modem is a 56K, but
    usually connects at somewhere between 32K and 46K, with the actual
    speed varying in use.

    Idiotically and also like all modems, most dial-up modems upload at a
    slower speed than they download.
     
    Your Name, Feb 22, 2014
    #7
  8. Your Name

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs Your Name wrote:
    [snip]
    Define "most".

    I have the same IP for weeks on end (and did so with my last ISP also). I
    know this because several services and games that I log onto regularly
    require me to re-enter my password if I'm connecting from a different IP
    (such as after a power surge). Otherwise they use the stored password.

    I find it amusing that you get the most budget internet connection you
    possibly can, then moan when you get what you pay for.
    --
    </Shaun>

    "Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
    cozy little classification in the DSM."
    David Melville (in r.a.s.f1).
     
    ~misfit~, Feb 22, 2014
    #8
  9. Your Name

    Your Name Guest

    Most, as in the majority, of broadband connection plans do not have a
    static IP address. To get that you have to pay more.


    It's not the "most budget internet connection" ... in fact Vodafone has
    pretty much THE most expensive dial-up connection in the country.
     
    Your Name, Feb 23, 2014
    #9
  10. Your Name

    Enkidu Guest

    Technically, you are talking rubbish again. Broadband modems are always
    powered on, and they always have a connection and provided you don't
    power them off, you keep the same IP address. I've had the same IP
    address for,literally, years. I know people who switch off their
    broadband router, but it is totally unnecessary.

    The only way that the IP address will change is if the connection is out
    for longer than the DHCP lease period, which ISPs make fairly short,
    about 6 minutes, I believe.
    32 - 46Kbits/sec? That's archaic.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Feb 23, 2014
    #10
  11. Your Name

    ~misfit~ Guest

    You talk like you have experience with several different broadband
    providors.

    Firstly you didn't say anything about a static IP, you said.. Ehh, it's
    above ^ ^ ^. That's patently not true.

    I *have* been with several providors now and the general rule is that, as
    long as your modem is on and connected you have the same IP. So, if your
    phone line and power supply are reliable you can essentially have a
    mostly-static IP. As in it doesn't change for weeks (sometimes months) on
    end. It doesn't, as you say, change every time you have a break. LOL!

    Yes it costs more to have a truly static IP as, if you disconnect and
    reconnect instead of getting a randonly assigned IP there is a further
    process that happens between your modem and the ISP that then connects you
    to the IP you've paid for. As nobody else can use that IP during any times
    that you might not be connected (as happens with random IP allocation) of
    course it's going to cost more. Some people turn their modems off when
    they're not actively using teh webz and the ISP make more money from those
    people as they can allocate the IP to someone else during those times.

    An ISP buys it's IP from further up the food chain so if they can get by
    with, say 95 IPs per 100 users then the service they're paying for costs 5%
    less. However if a person wants a static IP then they have to pay the full
    amount. It's logical and resonable.
    Well, more fool you.
    --
    </Shaun>

    "Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
    cozy little classification in the DSM."
    David Melville (in r.a.s.f1).
     
    ~misfit~, Feb 23, 2014
    #11
  12. Your Name

    Enkidu Guest

    And he doesn't understand how broadband works! Or modems for that
    matter. Idiotically he said "Idiotically and also like all modems, most
    dial-up modems upload at a slower speed than they download". The
    upload/download speed ratio is set by ISPs, who configure their
    equipment to give priority to download traffic. If Lennier were to
    connect two of his 56kbits/sec modems back to back he would get full
    speed in both directions.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Feb 23, 2014
    #12
  13. Your Name

    victor Guest

    Its not that budget either, it still costs $60 including the line for <
    5kB/s
    British Telecom pulled the plug on its 56k dialup in August last year.
    I doubt whether NZ telcos will bother with it much longer especially as
    the remaining users seem to be chronic complainers. Their modem racks
    are destined for a skip.
    Naked broadband plus VOIP doesn't cost much more.
     
    victor, Feb 23, 2014
    #13
  14. Your Name

    Your Name Guest

    <snip the usual load of drivel from someone who can't read>

    Here we go again with the argumentative numbnuts. :-\

    I said "permanent IP address", which is basically the same as a "static
    IP address".
     
    Your Name, Feb 23, 2014
    #14
  15. Your Name

    victor Guest

    Connecting from modem to modem will only give a theoretical max 33.6k
    speed in both directions.
    Connecting to an isp gives a 56k theoretical max download speed for
    technical reasons
     
    victor, Feb 23, 2014
    #15
  16. Your Name

    Enkidu Guest

    No. The majority of broadband connections don't have a *guaranteed* IP
    address. In practise most of them keep them for a long time.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Feb 23, 2014
    #16
  17. Your Name

    Enkidu Guest

    I recall visiting a long gone ISP, way back when. Their modems lay in a
    pile on a table. Literal, physical, modems in a literal, physical, pile!
    To be fair, they had just shifted premises and the whole place was in
    the process of being tidied up and organised. I believe that in more
    modern times a "modem rack" consists of a rack-mount unit providing
    several modem connections. When the unit running Lennier's dialup
    connection finally dies it will probably be the last ISP provided dialup
    connection in the country.).

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Feb 23, 2014
    #17
  18. Your Name

    Enkidu Guest

    Fair enough. It isn't asymmetric, though, which was my main point.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Feb 23, 2014
    #18
  19. Your Name

    Enkidu Guest

    Basically, it isn't.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Feb 23, 2014
    #19
  20. Your Name

    victor Guest

    Cable Modem customers have static IP numbers.
    DSL IP addresses don't really change any more since they changed to UBA,
    but they are self configuring.
    I don't think they have a shortage.
    Sometimes all you have to do is request a static IP.
    Others charge $5 per month.
    Broadband DSL modem/routers and cable modems are of course designed to
    be permanent household network connections to your isp.

    Youlbe bitter and a bit crazy too if I was on dialup.
     
    victor, Feb 23, 2014
    #20
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