Viewfinder on digital zoom cameras

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Walden0, Jun 9, 2004.

  1. Walden0

    Walden0 Guest

    Hi
    I am new to digital photography .I looked through the viewfinder of a digital
    zoom camera and it doesnt look like the view from a 35 mm SLR. the view from
    the 35mm slr is sharp and clear. the digital cameras viewfinder is not sharp.
    looks something like a camcorder image. Are all the digital zoom cameras are
    like this? Thanks, Russell.
     
    Walden0, Jun 9, 2004
    #1
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  2. That's a tough question, as I'm not sure just what you mean. I would have
    thought you meant an actual viewfinder, till you referred to a camcorder
    image. I'll assume you mean an actual viewfinder, not the image on an LCD.

    I use SLRs, so I know what you mean about the, uh, view. But I also use a
    Nikonos camera a lot, and it has a viewfinder. It may be that you are used
    to seeing the view through the lens. Viewfinders do not have the quality of
    the lens (and pentaprism). The viewfinder in 35mm cameras has 'frames'
    within the view to show what is supposed to turn up on the film. This means
    the photographer can see what's going on around the intended subject, which
    is a good thing in action shots. The result, though, is that the subject is
    not magnified, but somewhat reduced in apparent size.

    If you are indeed using a viewfinder, I think you'll get used to the
    differences. A viewfinder is a very helpful adjunct to the LCD in low light
    and no light situations.
     
    Phil Stripling, Jun 9, 2004
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  3. Walden0

    Snowbart Guest

    Hi,

    There are three kinds of viewfinders on digital camera's:
    - the ones you also find on non-SLR film camera's. Examples: the Canon A-75,
    Sony P-100.
    - the ones you also find on SLR film camera's. Examples: Canon EOS-300D,
    Nikon D70 (digital SLR's).
    - the ones that *look* like a SLR viewfinder, but who are really small LCD
    displays. Example: Minolta Dimage Z1.

    You are probably talking about the latter kind.

    HtH,
    -Bart
     
    Snowbart, Jun 9, 2004
    #3
  4. Walden0

    Mark B. Guest

    It sounds like you looked at a cam with an electronic view finder (EVF), so
    yes it would look just like a camcorder viewer. On the other hand, true
    digital SLRs have the same thru-the-lens view that you're used to on film
    SLRs.
    EVF isn't common, it's used on higher end digicams. Most other digicams use
    a non-TTL optical viewfinder and a LCD, either of which can be used to frame
    the shot. On my Canon G1, I use the LCD exclusively since it gives me a
    view of what the lens sees.

    Mark
     
    Mark B., Jun 9, 2004
    #4
  5. Walden0

    Lindyhop Guest

    The EVF is available on lower cost digicams, such as my FinePix S3000 (available for under $300US). I chose this camera both because of the 6X optical zoom and the EVF. The problem with digicams that have an optical viewfinder is that while they do show optical zoom they do not show digital zoom. For digital zoom you have to switch to the LCD. An EVF transparently integrates the optical and digital zoom for a more wysiwyg preview.
     
    Lindyhop, Jun 10, 2004
    #5
  6. Walden0

    Mark B. Guest

    Digital zoom - blech!

    The EVF is available on lower cost digicams, such as my FinePix S3000
    (available for under $300US). I chose this camera both because of the 6X
    optical zoom and the EVF. The problem with digicams that have an optical
    viewfinder is that while they do show optical zoom they do not show digital
    zoom. For digital zoom you have to switch to the LCD. An EVF transparently
    integrates the optical and digital zoom for a more wysiwyg preview.
     
    Mark B., Jun 11, 2004
    #6
  7. Walden0

    Lindyhop Guest

    I agree that digital zoom is not a desirable feature, but since it's included on most digicams I wanted to point out the zoom integration/viewfinder issue. With my first digicam it took me a while to figure out that digital zoom was not being represented in the optical viewfinder (then I turned it off <g>).
     
    Lindyhop, Jun 11, 2004
    #7
  8. Walden0

    Dave Brown Guest

    Most of the viewfinder lcds give you maybe 100K worth of pixels and
    not very good color resolution. You may however want to check out the
    Minolta Dimage A2 which has 1M pixels in the view finder. I had an A1
    and went to the A2 because of this. I take lots of macros and it
    really helped with the manual focusing.

    Regards,

    db
     
    Dave Brown, Jun 11, 2004
    #8
  9. Most cameras specify the viewfinder by the number of RGB tirples, i.e. the
    number of pixels.

    The Minolta A2 specifies the viewfinder by the number of individual RGB
    dots, i.e. three times the number of pixels. You actually have just over
    300K pixels, not 1M pixels. It is a VGA quality display.

    Personally, when a company has to lie like that, they loose my trust. It
    was one of the reasons that I sent my A2 back for a refund.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jun 11, 2004
    #9
  10. Walden0

    Bill Turner Guest

    _________________________________________________________

    Wouldn't individual RGB elements properly be called "color elements"
    rather than "picture elements". It takes three color elements to make
    one picture element doesn't it?
     
    Bill Turner, Jun 12, 2004
    #10
  11. []
    With CRTs, three "dots" made up one triad, or picture element. Displays
    using Trinitron technology have three lines making up on displayed line -
    there is no horizontal quantisation. My LCD monitor has square pixels,
    with each pixel being composed of what I would call three vertical stripes
    of red, green and blue. Call the component parts of pixel (picture
    element) "colour elements" if you like.

    All quantised displays are referred to by the number of picture elements
    they display - a 1024 x 768 LCD monitor for example. Minolta is the only
    manufacturer who lies about this, and quotes the number of "colour
    elements" as the number of pixels (922,000), instead of the more correct
    307,200 pixels. The only reason I can see for doing this is to deceive
    the person reading their advertising into a false belief about the quality
    of the display they are purchasing. This is really a pity, because the
    actual display is quite good! But I sent my A2 back.

    See:


    http://www.minoltausa.com/eprise/ma...ducts?cname=dig&fname=dig_slr&Mname=DiMAGE_A2

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jun 12, 2004
    #11
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