USB vs USB 2

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by justme, Dec 30, 2003.

  1. justme

    justme Guest

    I have purchased a USB 2 cable to go with my new Canon printer but now
    I'm thinking I might take it back and get my $20 back. I already have a
    regular (1.X?) hooked up to the printer and it seems pretty fast, would
    I gain any print speed by switching out the cables or should I take the
    2 back and get a refund? I'm using Windows 98 if that makes any difference.

    LeAnn
     
    justme, Dec 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. justme

    TV Slug Guest

    If the printer is not USB2 capable, the cable will not make a difference in
    the speed. Even if it is USB2 capable, the speed of the printer would
    probably be the limiting factor anyhow, but having a USB2 cable in this case
    would be sure to carry those faster bits.
     
    TV Slug, Dec 30, 2003
    #2
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  3. To achieve USB2 speed you need 3 things: A USB2-capable computer, a
    USB2-capable device, and a USB2-compatible cable connecting the computer
    to the device. (If the cable runs thru a hub then the hub must be
    USB2-compatible also.)

    You can make most computers USB2-capable by adding a USB2 card but I
    don't know of any way to make a printer USB2-capable if it isn't so I'd
    start by checking the printer specs. Frankly I don't think you'd gain
    much if any print speed using USB2-but I don't know for sure. If this is
    a 'page' printer (a printer that needs to load the entire page into
    memory before it starts printing it) then you might. If it's a 'line'
    printer (like most inkjets) then I doubt it.
     
    Calvin Crumrine, Dec 30, 2003
    #3
  4. justme

    justme Guest

    Well my printer is probably USB 2 compatible because the cables were
    right above the shelf that the printer was on at the store. It is a
    Canon I860 but my computer is probably not compatible, it's a HP
    Pavilion 4455. How can I find out weather it is or is not compatible?

    LeAnn
     
    justme, Dec 30, 2003
    #4
  5. In both cases, check the specs. Look in the manual or online. As a last
    resort, call tech support.
     
    Calvin Crumrine, Dec 30, 2003
    #5
  6. justme

    Thor Guest

    If it's using Win98 (and it was originally Win98 when you bought it), it
    isn't USB 2.0 capable unless you purchased a separate USB 2.0 interface
    card. In this case, I'd say get your money back for that expensive cable.
    You can even buy USB 2.0 cables for far less than that, if you shop around.
    That is a hugely inflated price if you ask me.


    ...
     
    Thor, Dec 30, 2003
    #6
  7. justme

    Michael-NC Guest

    Most cables will work just fine, especially for a home inkjet printer for
    really doesn't need USB2 speed. I've used USB1 cables on USB 2 High Speed
    Devices and they work just fine.
     
    Michael-NC, Dec 30, 2003
    #7
  8. Do you get USB2 speed using a USB1 cable? Assuming, of course, that both
    the device & the computer are USB2 capable.
     
    Calvin Crumrine, Dec 30, 2003
    #8
  9. justme

    V W Wall Guest

    The only difference between the spec for a USB1 cable and a USB2 cable
    is in the shielding and pair twist. For a short run, (connecting a
    printer), there would not be any difference in performance.

    Virg Wall
     
    V W Wall, Dec 30, 2003
    #9
  10. justme

    Michael-NC Guest

    On a Palm and a printer, I say yes but I haven't tried it on a high
    throughput device like a drive. I would say if you had a quality USB1 cable,
    it would support the USB2 high speed transfer rate. I'd at least try before
    blowing 20 bucks on a new cable.

    Also, as an aside, if a USB2 device does not have the "High Speed" logo, it
    isn't really USB2. There are many devices that call themselves USB2 "Full
    Speed."
    Avoid these is you want the high speed of USB2 "High Speed." Dumb, ain't it?
     
    Michael-NC, Dec 30, 2003
    #10
  11. Yes-I've noticed that. "Full Speed" is apparently defined as the full
    USB1 speed. "High Speed" is the term for USB2 speed. Makes me wonder if
    a marketing firm was involved in setting up the USB2 terminology.
     
    Calvin Crumrine, Dec 31, 2003
    #11
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