unsigned code

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Guest, Sep 26, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Hello


    Why is it that running unsigned 32 bit dribers on XP is ok but not on Vista
    64 bit? I'm stuck here with this customers Vista 64 bit computer and his 3G
    modem that won´t run !! Would appreciate a little help here.

    Best Regards


    Kent Karlsson


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    http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/co...7f0&dg=microsoft.public.windows.64bit.general
     
    Guest, Sep 26, 2007
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Kent:
    You can always press F8 during Vista boot (not BIOS boot) and choose the
    option that disables driver signing requirements.
    This will be effective until next reboot.
    Old tricks to disable driver signing permanently don't work any longer.
    You might also check www.linchpinlabs.com
    They have a program named "atsiv" (it is Vista spelled in reverse order)
    that has a workaround for driver signing (use it at your own risk!)
    It sort of has a signed driver that has the ability of loading usingned
    drivers.
    I used it with the RivaTuner utility for NVidia cards with success.
    I use it no longer because the newest Rivatuner 2.04 has signed drivers.
    Carlos
     
    Guest, Sep 26, 2007
    #2
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  3. Microsoft made a decision, well and thoroughly publicized in advance, to
    require signed drivers for 64bit Vista. The reason is simple - security.
    Since there wasn't a huge legacy of 64bit prior to Vista (let's face it,
    adoption of XP x64 was small), MS decided to take advantage of the
    opportunity to draw a line in the sand. Having signed drivers doesn't
    protect against bad drivers, but it does protect against an unknown person
    installing a driver - one of the most common ways that root kits work.

    The overall number of 32-bit applications and drivers was so large that it
    wasn't deemed possible to require signed drivers for 32-bit.
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Sep 26, 2007
    #3
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