TVL Demands License for Laptop and WiFi

Discussion in 'Home Networking' started by CJB, Sep 11, 2006.

  1. CJB

    Bob Eager Guest

    You're making this up as you go along. My statement is direct from TVLA.
     
    Bob Eager, Sep 23, 2006
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  2. CJB

    Conor Guest

    And of course, they've never been wrong in the past have they?

    Just how are they going to detect a breach of this?
     
    Conor, Sep 23, 2006
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  3. CJB

    Mike Guest

    There is no such organisation. Please don't perpetuate the myth that
    these bastards are a government agency.

    TVL (without the "A") is the trading name of Capita Business Services
    Ltd, a private company subcontracted by the BBC to collect television
    licence revenue.

    Mike.
     
    Mike, Sep 23, 2006
  4. CJB

    Alex Guest

    At 12:40:17 on 23/09/2006, Conor delighted uk.legal by announcing:
    Nevertheless, this time they're correct.
    How do they detect a breach of anything?
     
    Alex, Sep 23, 2006
  5. CJB

    Conor Guest

    So you actually don't know.
     
    Conor, Sep 23, 2006
  6. CJB

    Alex Guest

    At 14:02:37 on 23/09/2006, Conor delighted uk.legal by announcing:
    Don't know what? I don't really care how they do it. A joint tenancy
    requires just one licence. Separate tenancies require their own
    licences. I don't really see how knowing TVL's detection procedures
    changes this in any way.
     
    Alex, Sep 23, 2006
  7. CJB

    Conor Guest

    A computer looks to see if a specific address has a licence. If it
    doesn't a man in a van is sent round to check up.

    Unless they examine the tenancy agreement which is extremely unlikely
    as as far as they're concerned the address is licenced, they'll not be
    able to tell.

    So it's a stupid argument.
     
    Conor, Sep 23, 2006
  8. CJB

    Alex Guest

    At 14:14:10 on 23/09/2006, Conor delighted uk.legal by announcing:
    And letters are sent, and all that nonsense. What's that got to do
    with it?
    So what?
    So breaking the speed limit is only against the law when there's a
    camera or policeman about, eh?
     
    Alex, Sep 23, 2006
  9. CJB

    Bob Eager Guest

    Probably not as wrong (or as offensive) as you.
     
    Bob Eager, Sep 23, 2006
  10. CJB

    Conor Guest

    So how the **** are they to know whether or not there is a violation?
    No.

    Not very good at this are you numbnuts?

    --
    Conor

    I'm really a nice guy. If I had friends, they would tell you.

    Earn commission on online purchases, £2.50 just for signing up:
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    Conor, Sep 23, 2006
  11. CJB

    Alex Guest

    At 14:45:05 on 23/09/2006, Conor delighted uk.legal by announcing:
    I ask again. How is it relevant to the legality?
    You're clearly too upset to make a reasonable argument right now.
    Perhaps we can try again later when you've calmed down.
     
    Alex, Sep 23, 2006
  12. CJB

    Mark Goodge Guest

    That is what they do. They have the right to inspect the tenancy
    agreement if they suspect that the residents have individual
    tenancies.

    In practice, of course, they usually don't bother - they prefer to
    concentrate on the easier targets presented by definable addresses
    without licences. The only time they're bother to investigate in that
    depth is if it's obvious that it's a student residence. But that's
    merely a further indication of TVL's general numptiness rather than
    having any legal significance.

    Mark
     
    Mark Goodge, Sep 23, 2006
  13. CJB

    Mark Goodge Guest

    The BBC is the TVLA. They took over that role from the Home Office in
    1991. The BBC could, in theory, deal directly with licence payers in
    their role as the TVLA if they wanted to, cutting out the
    subcontractor, or the role of TVLA could be returned to a department
    of the Home Office or even moved to some other regulatory body such as
    Ofcom. So the TVLA hasn't gone away, it's just that it's not currently
    a direct agency of the government. However, the BBC don't use the term
    "TVLA" on any of their own public documentation, and they don't deal
    directly with the licence payers, preferring to contract that job out
    to a collection agency (currently Capita). So it's true to say that,
    at the moment, there isn't a TVLA that deals directly with the public
    although the legal designation still exists.

    Mark
     
    Mark Goodge, Sep 23, 2006
  14. CJB

    Cynic Guest

    The fact that something is or is not illegal has *nothing* to do with
    the question of whether anyone is likely to ever find out. The latter
    is of great *practical* interest however.
     
    Cynic, Sep 23, 2006
  15. CJB

    Cynic Guest

    So how would they know whether or not you have been speeding?
     
    Cynic, Sep 23, 2006
  16. CJB

    Conor Guest

    That's not what is being questioned. What is being questioned is
    enforcement.
    Not upset at all. I enjoy toying with people like you.


    --
    Conor

    I'm really a nice guy. If I had friends, they would tell you.

    Earn commission on online purchases, £2.50 just for signing up:
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    Conor, Sep 23, 2006
  17. CJB

    Conor Guest

    In my case, by examining the tachograph chart in my vehicle.

    For car drivers, following them, cameras etc.


    --
    Conor

    I'm really a nice guy. If I had friends, they would tell you.

    Earn commission on online purchases, £2.50 just for signing up:
    http://www.TopCashBack.co.uk/Conor/ref/index.htm
     
    Conor, Sep 23, 2006
  18. CJB

    Conor Guest

    My point exactly.


    --
    Conor

    I'm really a nice guy. If I had friends, they would tell you.

    Earn commission on online purchases, £2.50 just for signing up:
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    Conor, Sep 23, 2006
  19. CJB

    Alex Guest

    At 17:20:24 on 23/09/2006, Conor delighted uk.legal by announcing:
    No; what was being questioned was the assertion:

    "Note that domestic TV licenses apply to named named households, not
    premises. For instance, if you have a house in multiple occupation,
    such as student accomodation, each individual will need their own
    License."
     
    Alex, Sep 23, 2006
  20. CJB

    Alex Heney Guest

    Very rarely, in the statements they make publicly.

    They often say things in a misleading way, which one can reasonably
    argue is dishonest. But they are rarely actually wrong.

    And in this case, they certainly aren't, while you are. Numbering has
    nothing to do with it.

    With some difficulty, I imagine.

    But that is *completely* irrelevant to the legal requirement, it just
    means that in practice, it is likely that most people living in a
    multiple occupancy house would be able to get away with a single
    licence, even if the law may require them to have separate ones
    (depending on the way their tenancy is arranged)
     
    Alex Heney, Sep 23, 2006
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