Tripods - Hillwalking/trekking

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Faolan, Oct 4, 2003.

  1. Faolan

    Faolan Guest

    Ok, most of the posts I have come across in Usenet are ancient. I am
    looking for a tripod that can do the following:

    1) Panoramic,
    2) Lightweight,
    3) Portrait work (not essential but would be nice),
    4) be able to 'grow' with my needs, currently using prosumer digicam
    with fixed lens but will be buying a dSLR later.

    I mostly do architectural and landscape shots, with occasional 'candid'
    photographs of friends but maybe doing some studio work in the future.

    I have seen the Manfrotto tripods and many people recommend them but
    what model should I be looking at (UK market), and where can I get hold
    of them from on-line? I am looking at the £100 mark to spend tops.
    --
    Scottish Heritage:
    http://www.CelticShadows.co.uk
     
    Faolan, Oct 4, 2003
    #1
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  2. Faolan

    Stewy Guest

    Velbon and Jessops make some good ones.
    Nice thing about digital is you can set the camera to delayed action (self
    timer) stick it on a very lightweight tripod and still get pin sharp
    pictures (so long as the autofocus works smoothly)
    DSLRs are heavier, but used with a cable release may be more stable (greater
    weight) than a P&S. Id suggest buying a plastic or light aluminium now and
    perhaps a heavier one later if you feel it's really necessary.
    Heavy tripods are a bane if you're hiking or after a good night shot. My
    Velbon CX 440 weighs in at 1150 grams and extends up to 165cm - admittedly
    at that height its pretty flimsy, but with a self timer it's like having a
    much heavier one. It also has the pan/tilt as well as a quick release camera
    shoe.

    "Faolan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ok, most of the posts I have come across in Usenet are ancient. I am
    > looking for a tripod that can do the following:
    >
    > 1) Panoramic,
    > 2) Lightweight,
    > 3) Portrait work (not essential but would be nice),
    > 4) be able to 'grow' with my needs, currently using prosumer digicam
    > with fixed lens but will be buying a dSLR later.
    >
    > I mostly do architectural and landscape shots, with occasional 'candid'
    > photographs of friends but maybe doing some studio work in the future.
    >
    > I have seen the Manfrotto tripods and many people recommend them but
    > what model should I be looking at (UK market), and where can I get hold
    > of them from on-line? I am looking at the £100 mark to spend tops.
    > --
    > Scottish Heritage:
    > http://www.CelticShadows.co.uk
     
    Stewy, Oct 5, 2003
    #2
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  3. Faolan

    Robertwgross Guest

    In California, we call it hiking and backpacking. Since it is impractical to
    walk along with the tripod extended most of the time, it becomes very important
    to use a tripod that can be erected and folded down very easily, and the
    locking mechanisms govern that. I backpack with a full-height aluminum tripod
    that weighs about 3.3 pounds. Oh, spike feet are very important also, for dirt,
    gravel, sand, and rock.

    ---Bob Gross---
     
    Robertwgross, Oct 5, 2003
    #3
  4. On Sat, 4 Oct 2003 18:41:05 +0100, Faolan <>
    wrote:

    [snip]
    >I have seen the Manfrotto tripods and many people recommend them but
    >what model should I be looking at (UK market), and where can I get hold
    >of them from on-line? I am looking at the £100 mark to spend tops.


    I think the Manfrotto's will be a lot more than £100. I just bought a
    Gitzo model G2227 which I'll be using for trekking and also for
    general purpose use. But it's very expensive (much like the
    Manfrotto's).

    From a "recent" review done by "Digital Photographer" (Issue 6), in
    the sub-£100 category these are the models that they reviewed...

    Velbon MAXi 347GB - www.introphoto.co.uk
    Velbon Sherpa 450n - www.introphoto.co.uk
    Benbo Trekker Mk2 - www.patersonphotographic.com
    Bilora Model 1130 - www.patersonphotographic.com

    The Velbon MAXi is very portable and light, but may struggle with
    large loads. However, each tripod has its advantages and
    disadvantages so it will be a tough call on which one to go for.
    Myself, if money was an issue I might be tempted by the Bilora but it
    isn't the lightest tripod.

    --
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu
    Contact details : http://www.metalvortex.com/form/form.htm
    Website : http://www.metalvortex.com/

    "It ain't Coca Cola, it's rice" - The Clash
     
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu, Oct 5, 2003
    #4
  5. "Faolan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ok, most of the posts I have come across in Usenet are ancient. I am
    > looking for a tripod that can do the following:
    >
    > 1) Panoramic,
    > 2) Lightweight,
    > 3) Portrait work (not essential but would be nice),
    > 4) be able to 'grow' with my needs, currently using prosumer digicam
    > with fixed lens but will be buying a dSLR later.


    Check out www.traveltripod.com . This guy is the world's best authority
    on lightweight tripods, besides being me.

    I think that you probably should get the Velbon Chaser EFL-4 with the PH-263
    or
    PH-273 ball head.
     
    Steven M. Scharf, Oct 22, 2003
    #5
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