Training Guidance/Direction

Discussion in 'MCAD' started by Amar Kapadia, Sep 24, 2004.

  1. Amar Kapadia

    Amar Kapadia Guest

    Hello everyone:

    I have to tell you, I am coming into this world of certification pretty cold
    (or as they say nowadays a "newbie"), so I apologize if you all are having
    to reanswer the same questions on my behalf. I have read through many many
    post and have a good feel, but since I have to offer up the internet now to
    the others in my family, I am going to go ahead and begin asking you guys my
    questions. Thanks in advance.

    1) I notice that their seems to be two tracks of two tracks so to speak (C#
    and VB) and (ASP.NET or Windows Form). Since I am totally new, what
    combination is best? My experience is only writing code in VBA in Microsoft
    Access. My department really doesn't use any web-based application only
    Microsoft Access. I bought a book on C# and I can do simple stuff in it. I
    also own Visual Studio 2003. Anyway, I always find myself being far more
    productive with VBA in Access. Although everything is type enforced in C#
    it just seems so slow going in writing anything productive quickly (although
    does seem to be an elegant and concise language). I know I'm spoiled and
    VBA is probably a very sloppy language, but its all I have experience in.
    Anyway, any suggestions or input for me? Given what I've written it
    probably seems like VB.NET using Windows Form as my choice, but I'm thinking
    heading towards C# under the ASP.NET umbrella just because I think its more
    marketable skills to have. Also, I just feel that ASP.NET is pretty darn
    complicated (or so very different than Windows Form programming using VBA)
    and if I can master that, then Windows Form should be easier to digest. And
    given all the great things I've heard about C#, will it eventually become
    the dominant language? Will Microsoft Access eventually have C# in it?
    Wow, sorry...too many questions...but any comments will be great. Thanks.

    2) I've read much about the Amit Kalani books and do plan on purchasing it.
    All then I will have is that book, my Visual Studio 2003, my Windows XP Pro
    (which includes the IIS Server I believe), and my .NET SDK and stuff. Now
    outside of my time and dedication, do I need anything else to begin my
    studies? I will probably ask again later as to what is the best practice
    test to take, but I have enough info from the various posts to make my
    decision on using Transcender, etc. For now, as far as studies go, would I
    be good with that Amit Kalani book? Or do I need to first get one of those
    "Teach Yourself ... in 21 Days" book?

    Anyway, thanks everyone...sorry if it is a bunch of repeats, but I did try
    to read as many posts as I could before I had to get off the internet.

    Goodnight,
    Amar
     
    Amar Kapadia, Sep 24, 2004
    #1
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  2. Amar Kapadia

    V. Guest

    Hope this will help:
    Answers:
    1) For .NET it doesn't matter which language you use,
    that's the whole point of .NET; you can develop what you
    want in (almost) any language as long as you develop on
    Microsoft stuff ;-). So to speak: .NET is language
    independent where as J2EE is platform independent. So
    the choice between C# and VB.NET is irrelevant.
    2) I use Microsoft Press which is not really good. I
    also have the transcenders which are good. You can
    review your answers and get a link to MSDN which
    immidiately takes us to the one thing you will need: MSDN.
    As I've heard everywhere Amit's book is the best (maybe
    for VB it could be another) So you're OK there.

    good luck 2 you.

    V.
     
    V., Sep 24, 2004
    #2
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  3. Amar Kapadia

    Henry Guest

    I think the most important part in here is learning the technology.
    In my opinion, certification is secundary, it's just for assure that you learned the technology.

    So, if you are not confident enough I recommend you books to learn C#, ADO.NET and VS.NET, and not directly kalanis books for example, wich is focused mainly on exam certification topics.

    As for language, it is really independent, but, c# is the default language, and it implements all capabilities of CLS(stuff that not all languagem have).
    "Amar Kapadia" <> escreveu na mensagem Hello everyone:

    I have to tell you, I am coming into this world of certification pretty cold
    (or as they say nowadays a "newbie"), so I apologize if you all are having
    to reanswer the same questions on my behalf. I have read through many many
    post and have a good feel, but since I have to offer up the internet now to
    the others in my family, I am going to go ahead and begin asking you guys my
    questions. Thanks in advance.

    1) I notice that their seems to be two tracks of two tracks so to speak (C#
    and VB) and (ASP.NET or Windows Form). Since I am totally new, what
    combination is best? My experience is only writing code in VBA in Microsoft
    Access. My department really doesn't use any web-based application only
    Microsoft Access. I bought a book on C# and I can do simple stuff in it. I
    also own Visual Studio 2003. Anyway, I always find myself being far more
    productive with VBA in Access. Although everything is type enforced in C#
    it just seems so slow going in writing anything productive quickly (although
    does seem to be an elegant and concise language). I know I'm spoiled and
    VBA is probably a very sloppy language, but its all I have experience in.
    Anyway, any suggestions or input for me? Given what I've written it
    probably seems like VB.NET using Windows Form as my choice, but I'm thinking
    heading towards C# under the ASP.NET umbrella just because I think its more
    marketable skills to have. Also, I just feel that ASP.NET is pretty darn
    complicated (or so very different than Windows Form programming using VBA)
    and if I can master that, then Windows Form should be easier to digest. And
    given all the great things I've heard about C#, will it eventually become
    the dominant language? Will Microsoft Access eventually have C# in it?
    Wow, sorry...too many questions...but any comments will be great. Thanks.

    2) I've read much about the Amit Kalani books and do plan on purchasing it.
    All then I will have is that book, my Visual Studio 2003, my Windows XP Pro
    (which includes the IIS Server I believe), and my .NET SDK and stuff. Now
    outside of my time and dedication, do I need anything else to begin my
    studies? I will probably ask again later as to what is the best practice
    test to take, but I have enough info from the various posts to make my
    decision on using Transcender, etc. For now, as far as studies go, would I
    be good with that Amit Kalani book? Or do I need to first get one of those
    "Teach Yourself ... in 21 Days" book?

    Anyway, thanks everyone...sorry if it is a bunch of repeats, but I did try
    to read as many posts as I could before I had to get off the internet.

    Goodnight,
    Amar
     
    Henry, Sep 24, 2004
    #3
  4. Amar Kapadia

    Frank Mamone Guest

    I highly recommend Amit Kalani's books. But if you really want to excel and
    understand the topics I suggest you do some tutorials or get a book on
    Object Oriented Programming first. You will understand why things are done a
    certain way.

    You will also need SQL Server 2000 or MSDE(Free). If you can get the SQL
    Server so that you'll also get the Client Tools like Query Analyzer and
    Enterprise Manager which come in handy.

    Good luck!

    -Frank
     
    Frank Mamone, Sep 24, 2004
    #4
  5. Hi Henry,

    I'm confused. What makes C# the "default" language?

    --
    Cindy Winegarden MCSD, Microsoft Visual FoxPro MVP
    www.cindywinegarden.com


    As for language, it is really independent, but, c# is the default language,
    and it implements all capabilities of CLS(stuff that not all languagem
    have).
     
    Cindy Winegarden, Sep 24, 2004
    #5
  6. Amar Kapadia

    Raja Guest

    If you decide to do the vb.net track of MCAD, foll. books
    are the best (all by Mike Gunderloy)
    70-305 : http://tinyurl.com/56cmr
    70-306 : http://tinyurl.com/5hapf
    70-310 : http://tinyurl.com/52oav
    Errata : http://www.larkware.com/TGErrata.txt

    For C# track of MCAD, stick with Amit Kalani's books.
    They are the absolute best !
    C# track
    70-315 : http://tinyurl.com/4rhh7
    70-316 : http://tinyurl.com/64coq
    70-320 : http://tinyurl.com/6oeo4

    The choice of language is largely one's personal
    preference, sometimes dictated by work. Don't believe
    anyone who says "x language is better than y". It is not
    and it is not going to be !

    Of course, along with certification books, the foll. 2
    are recommended as well !
    ADO.Net Book : http://tinyurl.com/5fad9
    Asp.net Unleashed : http://tinyurl.com/6ch54
     
    Raja, Sep 24, 2004
    #6
  7. Amar Kapadia

    Amar Kapadia Guest

    V. Thanks. Yes I had forgotten about the the fact that .NET allows any
    language. Looks like another vote for Amit books.
     
    Amar Kapadia, Sep 25, 2004
    #7
  8. Amar Kapadia

    Amar Kapadia Guest

    Excellent tips. Thanks.
     
    Amar Kapadia, Sep 25, 2004
    #8
  9. Amar Kapadia

    Amar Kapadia Guest

    Thanks Raja. I'll keep your listing with all the links.
     
    Amar Kapadia, Sep 25, 2004
    #9
  10. Just an observation from reading posts over a period of some time but as
    soon as someone places C# over other languages, ya get mighty defensive. I
    understand that you might feel the need to "correct" people back into shape
    but the reality is that C# is new, exciting, powerful and mysterious.
    Having said that, it's human nature to want to make it appear to be more
    important than other languages when in fact it may not be. Ultimately, it's
    an opinion but it's hard to get excited over "anything-other-than-C#.net"
    since as I stated, C# is new and is getting the most attention.
     
    Merlin of SoCal, Sep 30, 2004
    #10
  11. Hi Merlin,

    What you're saying is what I'd describe as something like the "most popular"
    language. To me "default" means that something is hard-coded into the system
    to make it do one thing unless other thing(s) are specified. I was wondering
    if Henry knew some fact that I didn't know. If Henry was describing the
    "most popular" language then I don't think anyone can say that C# is not the
    most popular language.
     
    Cindy Winegarden, Sep 30, 2004
    #11
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