Top Ten Reasons To Walk Away From A Used Vehicle

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Plato, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. Plato

    Plato Guest

    Top Ten Reasons To Walk Away From A Used Vehicle

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    There are a few things to look for before you even talk to the seller.
    It doesn't matter if the vehicle is $1,500 or $15,000

    1. Check the tires. Look for uneven wear on the front and the back. This
    is caused by miss-allignment or bad ball joints. If the uneven wear is
    on the back tires the seller
    swapped them with the front to try to hide the problem. Also walk away
    if the vehicle needs new tires due to normal wear.

    2. Look around the car for missing trim. Look inside for the same. If
    the seller didn't care about replacing such then one may assume the
    seller may not have cared about
    other maintenance items as well.

    3. If the vehicle has a tow ball or hitch look for wear. You want to
    avoid any vehicle that's been used for towing.

    4. Look for fresh oil on the pavement under the engine and transmission.
    And also look for leaked out engine coolent. This one may be tough to
    judge as the seller is probably parking the vehicle in a different place
    then normal and a used car dealer may have a stone lot.

    5. If you are looking at a vehicle for sale in a service station lot or
    in front of a storefront call the number on the window. If you call and
    it's a pager take a hike. Make
    sure there is at least 6 months left on the inspection sticker and dont
    consider a vehicle with an out of state sticker.

    6. Stick your finger in the exhaust pipe. If you pull out some sticky
    black substance that's almost impossible to wipe off with a napkin or
    towell run away. If you only get a smear of sticky dust that you can
    clean off your finger easily and the vehicle has 100,000 miles it's
    probably OK.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Here are some things to check before you take a test ride.

    7. Pop the hood. Pull out the transmission dip stick and smell the fluid
    on the end. If it smells burned you dont want that ride. Pull out the
    oil dipstick. If it's black
    give it back. Look inside the radiator overflow tank to make sure the
    fluid looks clean. Leaky cooling systems can be temporily fixed with
    sealers which most often cause discoloration.

    8. Walk to the back of the vehicle and have the seller start it up.
    Watch the exhuast pipe carefully. If you see a short burst of blue smoke
    you got an oil burner. Dont
    bother having a seat.

    9. Look at the brake pedal. Lots of wear on the right means lots of stop
    and go. So does a new brake pedal pad the seller may have installed to
    hide the vehicle's history. Make sure all the doors and hatchback close
    with minimal effort. Make sure all the seat belts lock and unlock
    easily.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    The spin.

    10. This is the easy part. Use your nose. If you smell even just a hint
    of exhaust fumes or radiator fluid time to continue shopping. Check the
    heat and air. Check the headlights, blinkers, horn, and wipers.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    The point is that its easy to find a used vehicle without any of the
    above easily discovered defects by simply shopping around.
     
    Plato, Feb 3, 2005
    #1
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  2. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Feb 3, 2005
    #2
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  3. Plato

    Plato Guest

    Plato, Feb 4, 2005
    #3
  4. Plato

    Computer Kid Guest

    Any more reasons? I'm looking at a used car now.
     
    Computer Kid, Feb 4, 2005
    #4
  5. Plato

    Pennywise Guest

    On 3 Feb 2005 21:19:40 -0800, "Computer Kid"

    |> Any more reasons? I'm looking at a used car now.

    Turn on the radio and see what stations are program'd in.

    The theory is, if it's classical music the car has been taken better
    care of.

    http://www.lilligren.com/Redneck/redneck_airforce.htm

    --
     
    Pennywise, Feb 4, 2005
    #5
  6. Plato

    Plato Guest

    grin
     
    Plato, Feb 4, 2005
    #6
  7. Plato

    Paul B Guest

    Thanks for posting the links their hiairous : D
     
    Paul B, Feb 4, 2005
    #7
  8. Plato

    Scrote Guest

    ^^^^
    Rob K and Blinky will be along direclee ;-)
     
    Scrote, Feb 4, 2005
    #8
  9. Plato

    Plato Guest

    Top Ten Used Car Buying Tips For New Jersey Residents


    1. Add 50,000 to 100,000 miles to the odometer reading for the real
    mileage.

    2. Look for hair patches in the trunk and dead flies between the
    dashboard and windsheild. This is a sure sign the car's been used to
    transport a dead body or two.

    3. No hood ornament? No problem. In Jersey we wear them on our chest on
    a big chain that's why you dont see them anymore on cars.

    4. Count on buying 4 new tires within a month because in Jersey we dont
    change flats we just use Fix-A-Flat so we can get back into our car and
    lock it back up asap. In Jersey your car is your fort.

    5. Assume the oil and filters have never been changed since the car was
    new.

    6. Check that the back doors can open from the inside as it's common for
    the wise guys to disable that in advance of kidnapping and rape.

    7. If you see a Maxwell House Coffee can around the exhaust pipe that's
    the normal way the local garage fixes your bad exhaust for the $599 you
    paid. Dont worry about it.

    8. Make sure that the heat works as that's generally the way you'll have
    to cool down the engine in the Summer.

    9. Nevermind the hole in the floor. In Jersey we all have them to toss
    out empty beer cans and cocaine as we're being pulled over.

    10. Dont worry that the car has no pickup and wont go over 35 MPH as
    your average 30 mile commute to work will take 1 hour and 45 minutes
    anyway and your foot will never need to use the gas pedal.
     
    Plato, Feb 4, 2005
    #9
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