To mat or not to mat?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Paul Ciszek, Sep 5, 2012.

  1. Paul Ciszek

    Paul Ciszek Guest

    Do photos really need to be matted to be displayed in art shows?
    I see that one of the professional photo printing outfits in my
    area offers to mount prints on foamcore the same size as the print--
    something that makes no sense if you intend to mat the photo, but
    would be useful if you intended to pop it into a minimalist frame.
     
    Paul Ciszek, Sep 5, 2012
    #1
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  2. Some do, some don't, depends on the show, who will specify what they
    will accept.
    And is often used just by itself in shows, no frame. But note that
    over time some foam cores can warp, and will strongly resist being
    unwarped. I have a couple that were fine in the shows they were made
    for, but after a couple of years knocking round the house have warped
    to an unusable extent.
     
    Chris Malcolm, Sep 5, 2012
    #2
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  3. Paul Ciszek

    Me Guest

    I've used "self adhesive" foam core, but added 10x10mm pine moulding,
    mitre cut then glued to the back of the foam core. Hot melt glue seems
    to have been strong enough to hold the moulding.
    The edge of foam core is easily damaged. The prints need to be handled
    with care. I haven't seen the top layer of paper on the foam core
    delaminating, I live in an area with generally low relative humidity
    which may help.
     
    Me, Sep 5, 2012
    #3
  4. Paul Ciszek

    Paul Ciszek Guest

    Well, my plan was to pop the prints into some mass produced frames
    with foamcore backs to force them up against the glass, but no mats.
    I may even spring for some less-reflective glass, too.
     
    Paul Ciszek, Sep 6, 2012
    #4
  5. Paul Ciszek

    Me Guest

    It's not a good idea to have the print pressed up against the glass.
    I'm pretty sure that foamcore with the print attached would be fine as a
    backing in a frame (instead of heavy acid-free card backing), but you're
    either going to have to use a mat, or find a way to mount the print a mm
    or two back from the glass - perhaps using a shim around the edge of the
    glass, but hidden behind the edge of the frame.
    If they're pigment inkjet prints, either let them dry for a week or so
    before framing behind glass - or don't seal off the back with tape yet -
    so you can pull it apart after a few weeks to clean the glass. The
    coalescing solvent in the ink will fog the glass, and takes quite a long
    time to disperse.
     
    Me, Sep 7, 2012
    #5
  6. Paul Ciszek

    PeterN Guest

    Less reflective glass often cuts the contrast and shadow detail. You may
    want to consider that, and test before you mount.
     
    PeterN, Sep 7, 2012
    #6
  7. Paul Ciszek

    Robert Coe Guest

    : Do photos really need to be matted to be displayed in art shows?
    : I see that one of the professional photo printing outfits in my
    : area offers to mount prints on foamcore the same size as the print--
    : something that makes no sense if you intend to mat the photo, but
    : would be useful if you intended to pop it into a minimalist frame.

    Different shows have different rules. Some are quite specific.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Sep 8, 2012
    #7
  8. Paul Ciszek

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 9/6/2012 3:24 PM, Paul Ciszek wrote:
    : > In article <>,
    : >>
    : >> I have a number of large prints mounted on foam cores 'hung' on the
    : >> walls of my house using sets of four 3M Command strips. I've had no
    : >> problems with warping but I have noticed the paper outer on the foam
    : >> core starting to peel after a year or so.
    : >
    : > Well, my plan was to pop the prints into some mass produced frames
    : > with foamcore backs to force them up against the glass, but no mats.
    : > I may even spring for some less-reflective glass, too.
    : >
    : >
    : Less reflective glass often cuts the contrast and shadow detail. You may
    : want to consider that, and test before you mount.

    I suspect that some cheap non-reflective glass achieves its objective by
    having a slightly ground surface. And such glass will likely reduce contrast
    and detail. "Museum quality" non-reflective glass will not, but it's very
    expensive. I had a moderate-sized prcture framed with museum-quality glass a
    few months ago, and it increased the framing cost by more than $100.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Sep 8, 2012
    #8
  9. Paul Ciszek

    alan1browne Guest

    Art shows should/may have a presentation guide. See that first or call
    them up.

    You should specify to the framers what you need/want and they should do
    that.

    If they're offering a narrower range of services and can't satisfy real
    requirements they won't be in business as photo framers for very long.

    Photos for framing should not be "mounted" to anything. Usually pressed
    between the passe-partout matte and the packing matt (stiff
    cardboard-paper over foamcore for example) is sufficient. With at most
    a couple pieces of photo tape to hold them in place while manipulating.

    Go to a framing business.
     
    alan1browne, Sep 8, 2012
    #9
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