Tips on getting better results with built in flash?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Thump, Feb 5, 2007.

  1. Thump

    Thump Guest

    I have an ol' Canon S330. Just a basic point and shoot camera but I'm
    enjoying exploring it within it's limitations until I can afford a
    unit with the features I want.

    I was wondering if anyone had any hints/tips/tricks on how to make
    pics taken using the built in flash a bit less harsh. I know I can
    photoshop the pics afterwards, but I prefer to get them as nice as I
    can initially.

    This camera doesn't have the facility to trigger a remote flash and I
    avoid using the flash as much as possible. While I get some good
    results in low light conditions, there are occasions when a flash is
    necessary.

    Thanks

    Thump
     
    Thump, Feb 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. Thump

    Rudy Benner Guest

    I cannot give you a link, but there are strobes that will trigger on your
    built in flash. They also quench when your internal strobe quenches.

    I use a similar system for my underwater outfit. Inon D-2000 strobe.

    Perhaps someone will be able to come up with more/better information.
     
    Rudy Benner, Feb 5, 2007
    #2
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  3. : I have an ol' Canon S330. Just a basic point and shoot camera but I'm
    : enjoying exploring it within it's limitations until I can afford a
    : unit with the features I want.

    : I was wondering if anyone had any hints/tips/tricks on how to make
    : pics taken using the built in flash a bit less harsh. I know I can
    : photoshop the pics afterwards, but I prefer to get them as nice as I
    : can initially.

    : This camera doesn't have the facility to trigger a remote flash and I
    : avoid using the flash as much as possible. While I get some good
    : results in low light conditions, there are occasions when a flash is
    : necessary.

    : Thanks

    : Thump

    Two thoughts. Explore the prime distance. The flash tends to make things
    too close washed out. And things too far are too dark. But if you can
    discover the best distance for this flash it could be like "goldilocks'
    porridge", just right. :)

    The second thought involves dispersing the flash. Either stick some paper
    over the flash to "soften" it, or use some heavy card stock to bounce the
    light up toward a ceiling or off a nearby light colored wall. The
    dispersing of the light as well as the additional distance covered (to and
    from the wall) may help soften the harsh light. BTW, be aware that some
    flash units get hot with use, and repeted flashes can cause a buildup of
    heat. So if you use any paper or card light softener (either that the
    flash goes through or that it bounces off), make sure to check it
    frequently for heat. Nothing disturbs a fun photo session worse than when
    the camera (and possibly the photographer) catch fire. ;)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Feb 5, 2007
    #3
  4. Thump

    Mike Russell Guest

    Don't use the built-in flash as a flash at all, but as a fill light for
    people's faces in sunlight. In situations where you might ordinarily use
    flash, bump the iso, use software to clean up the nose and expect to toss
    most of your images. The ones that do turn out will be golden. Or use it
    as a trigger for a bounce slave flash.
     
    Mike Russell, Feb 5, 2007
    #4
  5. Thump

    RichG Guest

    1. Some point and shoot cameras (Sony H2 an H5 ) have the ability to choose
    the level of flash power. See if your camera has that option and if, so,
    lower the flash power.

    2. go to Ebay and type in "slave flash" You can add a bounce or other flash
    that is triggered by your own flash ( especially if you can dial the
    on-camera flash's power down.

    3. I cut up a plastic bathroom size semi-translucent drinking cup and I
    slip it over the pop-up flash, held with a little tape or a rubber band. It
    diffuses the light very well.

    regards, RichG
     
    RichG, Feb 5, 2007
    #5
  6. Thump

    Mac Lynch Guest

    Kia Ora
    This is how I use a flash on my Ricoh R3, have attached a small slave unit to
    my SunpaK G4500 and it reads the flash off the Ricoh without fail.
    Of course I have to use Manual for amount of flash, usually throttling it
    right back & with a dispersing box & bouncing it off the ceiling if inside.
    Built in flash by itself is very restricted. I like having more GRUNT!
    Mac
     
    Mac Lynch, Feb 6, 2007
    #6
  7. Thump

    Bucky Guest

    I second this idea. I previously posted that I had very good results
    with a point and shoot fixed flash by holding a white card just below
    the flash at ~45 degree angle. This bounces the light over the subject.
     
    Bucky, Feb 6, 2007
    #7
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