The Zen of Photography........

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mark C, Jul 31, 2003.

  1. Mark C

    Mark C Guest

    A buddy of mine sent me this quote......he claims he does not know who the
    author is.

    "Photographers can consider their photographs a success if they are
    satisfied that they have captured all the elements that conspired to create
    that particular moment in time. It is what I strive for...........I want to
    become part of that conspiracy.......only then will I instinctively know
    when to press the shutter release. It is not enough to learn how to
    see.....but one must explore the more intimate nature of
    vision......discover how to participate in what they see, as opposed to a
    being a simple observer."

    Any thoughts?

    Ciao,

    Mark C

    Nashville, TN
     
    Mark C, Jul 31, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Mark C

    Frank ess Guest

    | A buddy of mine sent me this quote......he claims he does not know
    who the
    | author is.
    |
    | "Photographers can consider their photographs a success if they are
    | satisfied that they have captured all the elements that conspired to
    create
    | that particular moment in time. It is what I strive for...........I
    want to
    | become part of that conspiracy.......only then will I instinctively
    know
    | when to press the shutter release. It is not enough to learn how to
    | see.....but one must explore the more intimate nature of
    | vision......discover how to participate in what they see, as opposed
    to a
    | being a simple observer."
    |
    | Any thoughts?
    |
    | Ciao,
    |
    | Mark C
    |
    | Nashville, TN
    |
    |


    Usher Fellig?
     
    Frank ess, Jul 31, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Sounds a little deep. Sometimes a photo is just a photo. It may not
    have any deep, special significance. It's just a picture of your kid,
    your dog or your wife. It has meaning certainly. They are people or
    animals or places you want to remember. But I don't think that most
    pictures are "all that and a bag of potato chips".

    There are exceptions of course. I think in my 25 years of using a
    camera I have taken less than 10 of those pictures.
     
    Andrew McDonald, Jul 31, 2003
    #3
  4. Sounds like some blather off NPR.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Jul 31, 2003
    #4
  5. Mark C

    Alan Browne Guest


    If a photographer is recording an event, he should not be anything but
    an observer; or rather be the provider of the means for others to see
    what he sees. He should not (in reasonable terms) perturb what he is
    trying to record, although he should go to all means possible to make
    the recording impactful ... be it perspective, lighting,
    exposure...whatever.

    The 'philosophy' above sounds more like the drippings of a new stylish
    photographer being interviewed for a vapid magazine article rather than
    the posture of an honest photgrapher.

    MO (against the grain).
    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Jul 31, 2003
    #5
  6. Mark C

    Paul Heslop Guest

    Confucius he say "Tha don't sweat much for a fat lass!"

    :O) I quite like the quote... though often the world conspires against
    the photographer.
     
    Paul Heslop, Jul 31, 2003
    #6
  7. By virtue of being in a certain time and space, you are a participant
    within those confines. Photographers are not invisible, nor are they
    inobtrusive. When you utilize your camera you are reacted to as a
    photographer, even if the collective reaction is one of overwhelming
    indifference. The photographer strives to create images with impact
    and feeling. These elements can only be evidenced when they are first
    perceived by the photographer. The photographer imparts his/her
    reaction to the scene photographed through prints; the viewer then
    reinterprets the prints according to his/her own feelings about the
    content of the image. The goal of a photographer, in my opinion,
    should not be one of complete objectivity. Rather, the photographer
    must convey his/her reaction to an event through the images he/she
    seeks out to capture/create. The images should then be used to affect
    a reaction within the viewer, not necessarily to advance a
    photographer's specific agenda, but to create an impetus for viewers
    to consider the situation of the image and to draw their own
    conclusion, based on their own values and experience, about the
    photographer's vision. Mere objectivity is best left for security and
    traffic cameras.
    A scene is a scene, but the combination of technical choices used in
    capturing its image can be utilized to create any number of reactions
    within the viewer.
    Michael
     
    street shooter, Aug 1, 2003
    #7
  8. Mark C

    Allan Mayer Guest



    I agree with the first part, in that all my photo's that I take, no matter the
    medium, I want to see just as I saw the scene.. People have told me that
    sometimes I have odd ways of framing, and composing photo's, but I tell
    them, thats just the way I saw it at that moment in time.
    I take pictures as nothing more than an extension of my eyes, and momentary
    glimpses of where I was, and what I was doing......
    Some exceptionally good, and some exceptionally bad, they all tell a story.

    And in that light, I worry not what others think of the technical
    aspect.........













    Allan
    http://members.aol.com/Thetabat/hello.html

    "Only a Gentleman can insult me, and a true Gentleman never will..."
     
    Allan Mayer, Aug 1, 2003
    #8
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.