The Shot Seen 'Round the World

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by ASAAR, Jun 11, 2009.

  1. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    ASAAR, Jun 11, 2009
    #1
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  2. ASAAR

    Paul Bartram Guest

    I have to say, I've never seen that photo before, nor can I see what is
    special about it, not being a baseball fan. As a photograph, it looks like
    any one of millions of 'point & shoot' shots taken from the stands at any
    sports event over the years. I'm sure it is historical with regards to the
    sport, but to me... nehh.

    Just my personal opinion, YMMV.

    Paul
     
    Paul Bartram, Jun 11, 2009
    #2
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  3. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    You have to realize that the image quality on that web page is
    quite poor. The Busch Pressman was a medium format camera and
    although I don't know which film size Rudy Mancuso used (it may have
    been 4x5, 6x9 or one of the other sizes, the image quality must have
    easily surpassed that of most of today's P&S cameras. Back in 1951
    cameras weren't quite that ubiquitous, nor were videos capturing the
    entire game (from multiple positions and angles) the way they are
    today. From the way it was described, Mancuso probably captured the
    only shot of what was widely known as 'the Shot Heard 'Round the
    World'. Heard, not seen.

    You may have no interest in that photo and even that sport, just
    as there are probably many historical moments in football (soccer),
    rugby, cricket that are unknown to me. But were I to come across an
    account of any of them, including pictures, I'd probably find them
    interesting. I'd say "Hmm, interesting.", not "to me... nehh."
    That's more like the attitude of uncurious George, our last
    president, who was not one that set many (if any) good examples to
    follow.

    From comments made by many that read that WSJ article, what was of
    most interest wasn't even the photo and the well known event that it
    captured. Much more interesting to them was how Mancuso finally
    came into possession of the long lost negative, just days before he
    died, and its final disposition.

    Of course. It's hard to disagree with truisms.
     
    ASAAR, Jun 11, 2009
    #3
  4. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    You have to realize that the image quality on that web page is
    quite poor. The Busch Pressman was a medium format camera and
    although I don't know which film size Rudy Mancuso used (it may have
    been 4x5, 6x9 or one of the other sizes, the image quality must have
    easily surpassed that of most of today's P&S cameras. Back in 1951
    cameras weren't quite that ubiquitous, nor were videos capturing the
    entire game (from multiple positions and angles) the way they are
    today. From the way it was described, Mancuso probably captured the
    only shot of what was widely known as 'the Shot Heard 'Round the
    World'. Heard, not seen.

    You may have no interest in that photo and even that sport, just
    as there are probably many historical moments in football (soccer),
    rugby, cricket that are unknown to me. But were I to come across an
    account of any of them, including pictures, I'd probably find them
    interesting. I'd say "Hmm, interesting.", not "to me... nehh."
    That's more like the attitude of uncurious George, our last
    president, who was not one that set many (if any) good examples to
    follow.

    From comments made by many that read that WSJ article, what was of
    most interest wasn't even the photo and the well known event that it
    captured. Much more interesting to them was how Mancuso finally
    came into possession of the long lost negative, just days before he
    died, and its final disposition.

    Of course. It's hard to disagree with truisms.
     
    ASAAR, Jun 11, 2009
    #4
  5. Completely agree.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jun 11, 2009
    #5
  6. ASAAR

    Me Guest

    Me too.
    We saw ed sullivan on TV back then, but as the consulates (under the big
    M signs) weren't yet established, we never got any really important news
    like that from the US. But thank god for president gates' invention of
    the internet - now we know - and that little snippet has every chance of
    achieving it's headline.
     
    Me, Jun 11, 2009
    #6
  7. ASAAR

    Rich Guest

    Rich, Jun 13, 2009
    #7
  8. ASAAR

    Chris H Guest

    In message <
    Otherwise known as the girl's game of Rounders in the civilised world.
    Quite...

    Baseball, American Football and the like are relay only of interest in
    the USA. So *any* event in Baseball only has local interest.

    The problem is that Americans think that things that are important only
    to Americans are of global significance.
     
    Chris H, Jun 13, 2009
    #8
  9. ASAAR

    tony cooper Guest

    Not just in the civilized world. I think the game is called
    "rounders" in the UK, too.
    You've not heard of Japan?
    The _Wall Street Journal_, the source of the article, is an American
    publication. It's quite natural for an American publication to
    contain articles of interest to Americans. It's quite possible that
    "The Grauniad" carries articles of interest only to Brits.
     
    tony cooper, Jun 13, 2009
    #9
  10. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    The deserved collapse of the British Empire so long ago is
    evidently still a bitter pill. As far as Rounders is concerned,
    baseball is an entirely different game that requires considerable
    physical attributes and skill. The lure of high pay attracts
    talented athletes from all over the world. I don't recall any from
    G.B. that have been signed, but if there are a few, they're
    certainly much more talented than even your most capable
    schoolgirls.

    That said, your parochial jibes aren't undeserved. Too many here
    still shout "We're number one. We're number one!" even far after
    that's no longer true. It's good that your infamous Paki Bashing no
    longer occurs . . . or is it simply less widely reported?
     
    ASAAR, Jun 13, 2009
    #10
  11. ASAAR

    tony cooper Guest

    There are many professional athletes, playing for American teams, who
    are from countries formerly part of the British Empire. The sun has
    set on the Empire, though, and Britannia rules only over the waves on
    the ponds on the greens.
     
    tony cooper, Jun 13, 2009
    #11
  12. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    Nor are the many current Dominican baseball stars. It's also not
    a new phenomenon, as shown by Roberto Clemente (Puerto Rico) being
    drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954 and Luis Aparicio
    (Venezuela) who won the "Rookie of the Year" award in 1956 when he
    replaced another Venezuelan shortstop, Chico Carrasquel.

    This Aparicio info came from the following website, which shows
    that baseball is not just a USA pastime, it's not even a global
    pastime, it's an interplanetary pastime, thanks to the contributions
    of the infamous Bill Veeck (as in wreck).


    http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/luis_aparicio_biography.shtml
     
    ASAAR, Jun 13, 2009
    #12
  13. ASAAR

    Chris H Guest

    OK so 2 countries..
    It does but it does not make them out to have global significance
    "the shot seen around the world" as long as "the world" is mainland
    USA.
     
    Chris H, Jun 13, 2009
    #13
  14. ASAAR

    J. Clarke Guest

    Guess you haven't heard of Cuba either. Commies they may be, but they love
    "beisbol".
     
    J. Clarke, Jun 13, 2009
    #14
  15. ASAAR

    tony cooper Guest

    Chris is doing exactly what he accuses Americans of doing, but in
    reverse. He accuses Americans of being interested only what is done
    in America as a Brit who is not interested in anything that is not
    done in the UK.

    That's OK, though. We Americans are not interested in the shove
    ha'penny finals, the Aunt Sally cup matches, or the conkers death
    matches and we don't feel the least bit arrogant about it.

    The British media have other priorities. BBC feels that women with
    large breasts are far more deserving of coverage than a baseball game.
    http://www.hiddenfeet.com/my-big-breasts-and-me-bbc-documentary/
     
    tony cooper, Jun 13, 2009
    #15
  16. ASAAR

    Peter Guest

    Don't be so insular.

    Add most of East Asia, many countries in Latin America, oh! yes, The Czech
    Republic, etc
     
    Peter, Jun 13, 2009
    #16
  17. ASAAR

    Peter Guest

    But, many of us used to be very interested in the Irish Sweepstakes.
    Over a mouthful is wasted.
     
    Peter, Jun 13, 2009
    #17
  18. ASAAR

    Paul Furman Guest

    Paul Furman, Jun 13, 2009
    #18
  19. In general, true, but there are exceptions. What else consititutes "the
    like"?
    Some Americans think this, just as some Brits, Aussies, French, German
    etc etc etc. are chauvinistic and/or narrowminded and/or boorish clods
    and/or misanthropic twits.

    You consistently engage in bashing others, and with a broad brush. Could
    you rethink this?
     
    John McWilliams, Jun 14, 2009
    #19
  20. ASAAR

    Robert Coe Guest

    : In message <
    : >> http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124424737510590641.html?mod=googlenew...
    : >>
    : >>  Finally, and none too soon!
    : >
    : >Baseball?
    :
    : Otherwise known as the girl's game of Rounders in the civilised world.
    :
    : > I thought someone had a picture of the assassination of
    : >Archduke Ferdinand.
    :
    : Quite...
    :
    : Baseball, American Football and the like are relay only of interest in
    : the USA. So *any* event in Baseball only has local interest.

    You don't say. Actually, it's quite possible that there are more baseball fans
    in Japan than there are soccer fans in England.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 14, 2009
    #20
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