Thank you All for your Expertise

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by LuvLatins, Dec 2, 2006.

  1. LuvLatins

    LuvLatins Guest

    Just a word of thanks to all of you that have been helping and
    tutoring me.

    Today, I turned on my Histogram and My Highlights features on my D200.
    WOW, I actually understand now what they mean about shooting to the
    right now. The D200 also has a highlights feature that will blink any
    small area that is blown in the RGB area. I took lots of pictures and
    when I force my expose way over to the left (+) The histogram goes to
    the right. I also now see what a blown highligh looks like too.

    My only concern is this clearly takes practice, because the images all
    look very light and overexposed on the camera. In fact, a NORMAL
    exposed picture now looks DARK to my eye. I suspect that is what
    takes the practice. I have not used a RAW convert yet on any of these
    pictures so for now I guess I must accept the fact that the finished
    photos will look great after I go through the post processing phase of
    the pictures

    Once again, THANKS *very* much, I actually feel like I am using the
    camera now. Good Bye forever P mode :)

    Before it was like driving a porsche and not taking it out of first
    gear. :)
     
    LuvLatins, Dec 2, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. LuvLatins

    Cynicor Guest

    I have found that the LCD display on the D200 shows photos significantly
    brighter than they actually are, even if I fiddle with the brightness
    control. Might just be my unit though.
     
    Cynicor, Dec 2, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. LuvLatins

    LuvLatins Guest

    No mine is like that also. The image in Capture looked great. Also
    pulled it up in ARC, quick qustion, if a small area is blown, is there
    a way to fix it. I guess, you would use photoshop to do it yes ? Or
    if a small peice is blown is that it ?

    Thanks again.
     
    LuvLatins, Dec 2, 2006
    #3
  4. LuvLatins

    Matt Ion Guest

    Look at it this way: it would take the same amount of experimentation with film,
    but this way, you can see the results individually, immediately, instead of
    having to blow off a full roll of 24 and then wait an hour for processing... and
    you can shoot, check, shoot, check, shoot again as much as you want without
    having to worry about the cost.
     
    Matt Ion, Dec 2, 2006
    #4
  5. LuvLatins

    if Guest

    This seems to be a problem with LCDs generally. On my camera highlights
    frequently look blown on the LCD even with brightness at minimum, yet the
    histogram is ok and if I view the LCD at an angle I can see highlight
    detail that is invisible looking straight on. I know computer monitor LCDs
    have been criticised for being too bright (typically 2-3 times CRT
    brightness) maybe this is the same problem.
     
    if, Dec 2, 2006
    #5
  6. LuvLatins

    Arnor Guest

    Hi,
    Everything takes practice<g> You may need to check the LCD brightness
    setting (if the camera has one) to better adjust it for the right
    brightness, but I don't trust the LCD much for checking brightness as
    it is so dependent on the light around you.

    Glad you are figuring this out:) I find that I use the LCD mostly to
    check the histogram to see if it's ok and to check composition. On my
    camer (Canon EOS 350) the LCD is not sharp enough (only about 115,000
    pixels if I remember correctly) to show me if the photo is sharp or
    not.

    Best regards,

    Arnor Baldvinsson
    San Antonio, Texas
     
    Arnor, Dec 3, 2006
    #6
  7. LuvLatins

    Mueen Nawaz Guest


    Or one could just learn the basics of metering, shutter and aperture
    control...

    --
    "Honey, answer the phone." "Okay. BaRRING! BRRNG! BaRR"


    /\ /\ /\ /
    / \/ \ u e e n / \/ a w a z anl
     
    Mueen Nawaz, Dec 3, 2006
    #7
  8. : Matt Ion wrote:
    : > Look at it this way: it would take the same amount of experimentation
    : > with film, but this way, you can see the results individually,
    : > immediately, instead of having to blow off a full roll of 24 and then
    : > wait an hour for processing... and you can shoot, check, shoot, check,
    : > shoot again as much as you want without having to worry about the cost.


    : Or one could just learn the basics of metering, shutter and
    : aperture control...

    True, but while learning those basics, the immediate feedback provided by
    digital can greatly assist in a more rapid learning curve. Having the
    basic "book learning" and theory is good. Learning to apply that knowledge
    to the real world is good. But it makes it much easier to see the results
    of the practice when you can snap an image and then make a small change in
    settings and snap another, then can examine the results before you even
    leave the spot, incase further experimental changes are called for. And
    all these experiments only cost you the cost of a small bit of electrical
    charge from a battery (or the electricity to recharge a battery).
    Everything else is reusable.

    For example, back when I was shooting film I would have never even thought
    of choosing a complex scene and shooting 50 images of the exact same
    thing, with each image being taken with a slightly different combination
    of settings, purely to see how different combinations effect the final
    result. On the other hand I have done this several times with my digital.
    Some of the images were bracketing the exposure, metered on the shadows,
    some metering on the highlights, some in the middle, etc. I have
    discovered that in many situations the book may say that there is one
    "best" way to set the settings, but there are frequently many different
    combinations that "work". And some of the settings give different but
    perfect results. If I hadn't done all that experimenting (sometimes to
    rediculous extents) I would not have thought of some of the variations
    available to me. Now that I know what kinds of effects that I can get I
    sometimes deliberately shoot these "incorrect" settings shots just to get
    a particular effect.

    JMHO

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Dec 3, 2006
    #8
  9. Why not change the brightness of the LCD as per p116 of the fine manual?
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Dec 9, 2006
    #9
  10. LuvLatins

    Matt Ion Guest

    One could. That doesn't negate the advantages I outlined above.
     
    Matt Ion, Dec 15, 2006
    #10
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.