Technical ignorance allows for some funny situations

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Jun 8, 2014.

  1. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    TCM has been shown to work well when used in connection with Western
    medicine. We could easily get into a discussion of why, and if I am able
    to travel, would enjoy a good discussion with you. My knowledge of
    medicine and drugs comes from the business end and working on regulatory
    matters. I had a lot of clients in the health care field. In order to
    represent them properly, I had to understand their business. When doing
    contract negotiations, it was essential to due sufficient due diligence,
    to ensure the other side was capable of compliance with the contract.
    Just as you were able to detect areas to pursue from twitching and body
    language, I was able to detect things that didn't make sense, often from
    subtle clues.

    Back to the topic of homeopathic medicine. I agree there is a lot of
    room for fraud in the unregulated space. And indeed much fraud is
    committed. That doesn't mean that none of it works. A placebo effect
    recovery is very much a cure. The mind can have an effect on the body
    that few of us really understand. Several years ago we went to a wedding
    where the brides father was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer, and
    was not expected to live more than a few weeks. He wanted very much to
    be at his daughter's wedding, but insisted that they not change the
    wedding plans. (The wedding was about eight months after he was
    diagnosed.) Plans were made for him to watch the wedding from the
    hospice, if he was still alive. He appeared at the wedding, wearing his
    tux. His cancer had gone into almost a complete remission, which lasted
    until the day the newly weds returned from their honeymoon. Coincidence,
    maybe. I don't know the answer, and neither do his oncologist.


    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #61
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  2. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    And you prove it with the quantity of asinine postings.
    You don't want to, because the facts would hurt your argument.
    Once more you have proven yourself.

    You bore me.
     
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #62
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  3. RichA

    Guest Guest

    nonsense. placebos don't cure anything.

    all they do is make the person believe they're taking a cure, which may
    have value in itself but that's about it.
    coincidence.
     
    Guest, Jun 11, 2014
    #63
  4. RichA

    Guest Guest

    if they're actually facts, then you should be able to find a link that
    has no hoops.
    yet you keep reading and responding to my posts.
     
    Guest, Jun 11, 2014
    #64
  5. RichA

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Uhhh...Dave...about the National Report. It's satire. It's not real
    news. Compare it to "The Onion", but not as well done.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jun 11, 2014
    #65
  6. RichA

    Tony Cooper Guest

    No, it takes someone who can write believable satire that sucks in
    idiots like you. It's a spoof site.

    What's funny is that Fox News once picked up a story from the National
    Report, thought it was real, and ran it.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jun 11, 2014
    #66
  7. RichA

    Whisky-dave Guest

     
    Whisky-dave, Jun 11, 2014
    #67
  8. RichA

    Whisky-dave Guest

    I read some of teh opening page wasn;t prompted to login maybe I missed something.
     
    Whisky-dave, Jun 11, 2014
    #68
  9. RichA

    Whisky-dave Guest

    I was once told that the earth was optically flat, I'll,let those those know about optics work that one out, anyone know anything about lens theory ;-)
     
    Whisky-dave, Jun 11, 2014
    #69
  10. RichA

    Whisky-dave Guest

    If stupidity could be turned into energy we'd have some pretty powerful polititions. So does that make the most powerful polititions a source of stupidity, it can certainly seem that way at times.
     
    Whisky-dave, Jun 11, 2014
    #70
  11. RichA

    Whisky-dave Guest

    I'm not sure it's a major killer of people unless you count drowning and even then drowning is not normaly classed as a major killer.

    But drinking excessive amounts of water can overload the kidneys/liver and cause death.
    Note I don't put ice in my whisky ;-)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_intoxication
     
    Whisky-dave, Jun 11, 2014
    #71
  12. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    Actually I was talking about your career in law enforcement, where in
    dealing with people instinct is an important component of your job.

    I don't know for sure. I have heard of similar events from friends who
    are oncologists.
     
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #72
  13. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    No it is not. But, it is a branch of what we call alternative medicine.
     
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #73
  14. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    Cure is a subset of helpful. But, is any "cure" really permanent.


     
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #74
  15. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/11/2014 12:48 AM, Savageduck wrote:

    I would not take Wikipedia as a scientific authority. Yes it does
    represent current thought to a large degree. But it is not scientific
    authority.

    I am not as quick as you to put down alternative treatments, including
    homeopathy.
     
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #75
  16. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    All of that is what I consider instinct. To my way of thinking the word
    instinct includes the total of your life experiences.
    Without knowing, I am willing to bet that there have been times when a
    witness surprises you.

    Couldn't agree more. Which brings us back to medicine. A skilled
    diagnostic physician can often learn a lot about his patients condition.
    Yet, all too often today he puts the patient in the hands of a PA and/or
    a nurse to "take the vitals." During these routine procedures the doc
    can be talking to his patient. It is during the discussion that the
    patient often opens up and the real problems are disclosed. Yet Medicare
    and insurance rates don't pay enough to allow the doc to take that time.



    After Syracuse I worked at Faxton Hospital in Utica, NY for three years,
     
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #76
  17. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    Acupuncture is as appropriate a treatment for a cardiac issue as
    dialysis, or ketchup.
    We are still in the early stages of the healing arts. I would not be so
    quick to dismiss anything.

    With no chemical intervention my heart ejection fraction increased from
    36% to 52% by using a machine that pumps air into me at night.

    Skin cancer is prevented through an intense dose of UV light.

    Dogs have been accurate in diagnosing cancer.


    Modern medicine has rediscovered leeches.

    Don't misunderstand my position. While I don't endorse all alternative
    medicines, I don't dismiss all, out of hand.
     
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #77
  18. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    In real life police work is rarely as portrayed on TV, or in the movies.

    I can think of two movies that portrayed certain exploits of some of my
    former clients. In one case I had to convince him that it was not in his
    best interests to sue the producers because they did not portray the
    incidents accurately.
     
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #78
  19. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    Nope. I have a pacemaker/defibrillator. And I never had acupuncture. I
    do have bad bad knees, though.

    I am well aware of that. I phrased it that way for emphasis that we are
    rarely certain about what works and what doesn't.
    RE: my coronary conditions. After a couple of hours in Butterfly World
    in Pompano, my BP went down to 110/60.
    A doctor friend, told me that when he had patients with sexual
    dysfunction, he suggested that they try someone new. Is that an
    alternative treatment?


    Absolutely I took BP meds. Without a change in meds my ejection fraction
    increased significantly. No, that's not completely accurate. certain
    meds were decreased.
    It's called photodynamic therapy, and being administered as Sloan-Kettering.
    This article from the National Cancer Institute explains the treatment.

    Again, just because we did it in the past, doesn't mean the treatment is
    snake oil.
    Let's just agree to disagree on homeopathic medicine and hope we both
    live to find out that my position is correct.
     
    PeterN, Jun 11, 2014
    #79
  20. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    It's purpose is to prevent actinic kerotosis from developing into
    cancer. It is not used on cancers. I have been getting those treatments
    for several years, and hopefully understand my treatments.
     
    PeterN, Jun 12, 2014
    #80
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