taking picture of strangers... ask for permission?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by chibitul, Oct 6, 2003.

  1. chibitul

    Lionel Guest

    Word has it that on 11 Oct 2003 01:06:51 GMT, in this august forum,
    (Azzz1588) said:
    Oh dear. You thought that troll was me?

    I guess it's true what they say about AOL users...
     
    Lionel, Oct 16, 2003
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  2. chibitul

    leicaddict Guest

    I hate to bust your bubble, but anyone being photographed and that
    photograph being used for commerical purpose still has to sign a model
    release. Just because the tour operator hired you to take photos,
    doesn't mean that you don't need a release to take photos and use them
    for commerical purposes from the participants. photoenvisions, what a
    laugh.
     
    leicaddict, Oct 18, 2003
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  3. chibitul

    Mxsmanic Guest

    The tour contract signed by customers may include a model release. The
    model release is dependent on the uses to which the image will be put,
    not upon the person taking the photos. So if a customer authorizes
    publication of his image when that image is photographed as part of the
    tour, it doesn't matter whom the tour hires as photographer, and the
    photographer doesn't need to get a separate release unless he needs one
    for uses that are not authorized by the release in the tour contract.
     
    Mxsmanic, Oct 18, 2003
  4. Steve, as always with legal advice, it matters totally what jurisdiction
    you are concerned with. What Leicaddict says may be true for whatever
    asylum he lives in. Where I live, you don't *need* a model release for
    anything taken in a public place, but it's *advisable* to get one if the
    photo is to be used to endorse any commercial product or political
    opinion, or will be captioned in such a way that it holds the person to
    ridicule (it's often the caption which causes more problems than the
    photo).

    Bear in mind that releases often impose *more* restrictions on the
    photographer than would have existed if no release was sought.

    What it is where you live I have absolutely no idea. If it's for a
    library they should advise. For your case, given that the other parties
    were told what was going on and were (I assume - I missed the beginning)
    incidental to the photo, I doubt you would have a problem here. Again,
    in Thailand, ???
     
    David Littlewood, Oct 19, 2003
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