Switch Spec and Design Principles

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Michael, May 31, 2004.

  1. Michael

    Michael Guest

    Hello All,

    I were given a RFP for networking design in which they request a backbone
    switch and one of its spec must support VLAN, CoS and CIR.

    (1) I know a bit of CoS, but I'm not familiar with this function in relation
    to backbone switch. Would you please tell me how CoS is applied to backbone
    switch?

    (2) I know FR CIR, but I've no idea about CIR on a backbone switch. Would
    you please tell me?

    (3) I know layer 3 switch is known for its hardware routing. Would you
    please tell me where and when we can put a layer 3 switch into networks and
    what kinds of design schemes we can use in network design?

    (4) Where and when we can put a "multilayer switch" into networks and what
    kinds of design schemes we can use in network design?

    (5) Can we say a layer 4 switch is able to do anything that a layer 3 switch
    can do?
     
    Michael, May 31, 2004
    #1
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  2. :I were given a RFP for networking design in which they request a backbone
    :switch and one of its spec must support VLAN, CoS and CIR.

    If your organization is a commercial company that is intending to bid
    on this RFP, and your organization does not have experience enough to
    answer the questions you set forth, then your organization does not
    have the experience to impliment the RFP and, in my opinion, should not
    bid.


    :(3) I know layer 3 switch is known for its hardware routing. Would you
    :please tell me where and when we can put a layer 3 switch into networks and
    :what kinds of design schemes we can use in network design?

    :(4) Where and when we can put a "multilayer switch" into networks and what
    :kinds of design schemes we can use in network design?

    :(5) Can we say a layer 4 switch is able to do anything that a layer 3 switch
    :can do?

    Those questions look like "homework" questions, not like questions that
    would arise out of a commercial RFP.


    To answer #5: NO. A *particular* Layer 3 switch might have access
    control lists based upon IP source or destination, whereas a different
    *particular* layer 4 switch might only allow access controls based upon
    the IP destination -- but might also allow access controls based upon
    destination protocol and port. Or one particular Layer 3 might support BGP
    whereas a different particular Layer 4 switch might only support RIP1.

    To phrase this another way: there are many different features possible
    for Layer 3 switches, and the fact that a particular device is a Layer 4
    switch does not mean that that device impliments all -possible- Layer 3
    features... just that it *could* impliment those features.

    Do not expect an off-brand $30 "Layer 3 Switch" to impliment very much.
    Do not expect an off-brand $130 "Layer 4 switch" to impliment very
    much of what a top-quality $3000 "Layer 3 Switch" impliments.

    As the number of layers goes up, the -potential- features increase,
    but the -actual- features are going to depend upon marketting considerations.
     
    Walter Roberson, May 31, 2004
    #2
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