sticky ip = static ip?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by jrefactors, Apr 14, 2005.

  1. jrefactors

    Scooby Guest

    While that is the general perception, it is partly incorrect. Yes, mostly
    that is the way that people or companies get their ip address. However,
    private companies can (and do) own a block of ips. They are free to move
    them to a different isp. See:
    http://www.arin.net/registration/guidelines/ipv4_initial_alloc.html

    For the most part, these are just being handed out to ISP's today. However,
    many companies still own their blocks from being assigned them a long time
    ago. That was the real fear of IPv4 addresses running out. Now, most
    companies just get their addresses from their upstream provider. While this
    does provide for extending the life of the IPv4 address scheme, it makes it
    a royol PITA trying to move your internet services to a different ISP.
    That is the very nature of DHCP and has nothing to do with 'sticky'. With
    DHCP, the address is renewed once half of the lease has expired. This
    insures that as long as the address is not given up by the client, it will
    stay the same. Things that can trigger the lease being given up would be
    the lease expiring (client device turned off for term of lease), DHCP server
    being rebooted, or in some cases, the client being rebooted. I think
    sometimes these cable providers flush their DHCP servers and reboot end
    devices just to force the change and keep people from running home servers.
    My interpretation of sticky is that an address is married to a device or
    user independent of the DHCP parameters stated above. As I mentioned in a
    previous post, I do just that with a Windows VPN. The address is tied to a
    user, but they don't know the difference since they use DHCP. But, they will
    get the same address every time. I also have a Netscreen/Juniper VPN device
    which does the same thing.
    Jim
     
    Scooby, Apr 15, 2005
    #21
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  2. jrefactors

    DevilsPGD Guest

    In message <> David Ross
    In some cases people also associate "static" vs "dynamic" with how
    they're assigned. One local ISP assigns all IPs via DHCP, and a lot of
    people refuse to call those static IPs "static".

    Note that DHCP is mandatory with this ISP, if you don't renew your lease
    then traffic will no longer be routed to your IP.


    --
    Like a lot of husbands throughout history, Mr. Webster
    would sit down and try to talk to his wife.
    As soon as he'd say something though, she'd fire back with,
    "And just what the hell is THAT supposed to mean?"
    Thus, Webster's Dictionary was born.
     
    DevilsPGD, Apr 16, 2005
    #22
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  3. Some devices will refuse to consider that static as well. IPSEC vpns on
    some devices won't work with DHCP assigned addresses.
     
    T. Sean Weintz, Apr 21, 2005
    #23
  4. jrefactors

    OldSchool

    Joined:
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    SBC Sticky IP - not always good

    Sticky v. Real Static IP - all things are not equal. We send/receive employee time info to about 30 IP-based timeclocks in as many warehouses throughout the LA area. We are unable to backup and restore employee templates in only two locations - the ones connected via SBC/ATT sticky IP.

    I was a DSL field technician for 5 years, and installed between 4,000 and 5,000 commercial and residential circuits during that time. I've been Cisco certified since 2001, and I'm intimately familiar with WAN networking technologies. Every engineer I speak to concerning this matter thinks SBC is out to lunch. On the face of it, it looks like it works, and if all you want to do is browse the internet and grab your POP3, you'll never see any difference.

    If you actually want real, fully routable, static Public IP's, go with anybody except SBC/ATT. Not only does it not work exactly like real static IP, but the folks I dealt with at SBC/ATT were consistently useless in helping me ascertain exactly where the problem was. My troubleshooting skills are flawless. I eliminated every potential point of failure that could be attributed to our equipment or our network, leaving the issue squarely on the SBC/ATT network. No one had any answers, and all I got was a take-it-or-leave-it.

    I'm leaving it. I'll never ever ever ever place my client's commercial relationships in jeopardy again by depending on SBC/ATT.
     
    OldSchool, Sep 18, 2006
    #24
  5. jrefactors

    OldSchool

    Joined:
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    Sticky IP - Not Always Good

    Sticky v. Real Static IP - all things are not equal. We send/receive employee time info to about 30 IP-based timeclocks in as many warehouses throughout the LA area. We are unable to backup and restore employee templates in only two locations - the ones connected via SBC/ATT sticky IP.

    I was a DSL field technician for 5 years, and installed between 4,000 and 5,000 commercial and residential circuits during that time. I've been Cisco certified since 2001, and I'm intimately familiar with WAN networking technologies. Every engineer I speak to concerning this matter thinks SBC is out to lunch. On the face of it, it looks like it works, and if all you want to do is browse the internet and grab your POP3, you'll never see any difference.

    If you actually want real, fully routable, static Public IP's, go with anybody except SBC/ATT. Not only does it not work exactly like real static IP, but the folks I dealt with at SBC/ATT were consistently useless in helping me ascertain exactly where the problem was. My troubleshooting skills are flawless. I eliminated every potential point of failure that could be attributed to our equipment or our network, leaving the issue squarely on the SBC/ATT network. No one had any answers, and all I got was a take-it-or-leave-it.

    I'm leaving it. I'll never ever ever ever place my client's commercial relationships in jeopardy again by depending on SBC/ATT.
     
    OldSchool, Sep 18, 2006
    #25
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