SPA3102: Intermittantly Needs Reboot?

Discussion in 'UK VOIP' started by (PeteCresswell), Sep 8, 2012.

  1. I have all my outgoing except for "800" and "911" (free long
    distance and emergency respectively) going out to my VOIP
    provider via a LinkSys SPA3102 gateway.

    It had been working 100% a-ok until a couple of months ago.

    Then, occasionally, we would dial a long distance number and it
    would just ring forever or would return "Busy".

    Upon investigation, it turned out that the number was not busy
    and re-booting the SPA3102 by unplugging/re-plugging the power
    supply remedied the situation.

    This has happened maybe a half-dozen times since the first
    occurrence.

    My kneejerk reaction is to put a timer on the power supply and
    just turn it off for a minute and then back on every 24 hours.

    But it begs the question "Why?".

    Has anybody been here?
     
    (PeteCresswell), Sep 8, 2012
    #1
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  2. (PeteCresswell)

    Graham. Guest

    Could be a DNS issue. Try puting in the IP address of the SIP proxy
    instead of the domain name.

    Or you could turn off the DHCP client in the ATA and assign a static
    IP, gateway, and DNS manually. You are not tied to your ISPs DNS
    server pair, you can use OpenDNS (208.67.222.222 & 208.67.220.220)
     
    Graham., Sep 8, 2012
    #2
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  3. Per Graham.:
    Reading between the lines, I come away thinking that:

    - The symptoms could indicate inability of the 3102 to
    connect to my VOIP provider

    - Re-booting somehow remedies that situation. Maybe something
    like "N" unsuccessful tries by the 3102 and it gives up
    until the next boot?
     
    (PeteCresswell), Sep 8, 2012
    #3
  4. (PeteCresswell)

    Graham. Guest

    The ability or not to register with the provider usually is only an
    issue with incoming calls.
     
    Graham., Sep 8, 2012
    #4
  5. (PeteCresswell)

    Bob Eager Guest

    If it's still responding, and not 'frozen', reboot it via the web browser
    port: just use some program (perhaps run regularly) to access:

    http://my-spa3102.example.com/admin/reboot
     
    Bob Eager, Sep 8, 2012
    #5
  6. A very strange first reaction. Surely the first reaction should be to
    look at a packet dump of your local network, and see what the offending
    device is actually doing when you try to make the failing call?
     
    David Woodhouse, Sep 16, 2012
    #6
  7. Per David Woodhouse:
    It would probably work around the problem - albeit not very
    elegantly.

    Well, now I can at least spell "Packet Dump"....

    Can anybody name a utility that can record packets continuously
    for days at a time (which I'm guessing is the prerequisite to
    creating a packet dump)?
     
    (PeteCresswell), Sep 16, 2012
    #7
  8. tcpdump to do the recording, wireshark to do the analysis.
     
    Roger Burton West, Sep 16, 2012
    #8
  9. Roger already answered, but I'll point out that you don't need to do it
    for days at a time. You said it was repeatable once it starts occurring.

    So wait for it to occur, start tcpdump, make a (failing) call, stop
    tcpdump. Then you have a nice simple capture demonstrating the problem.

    Try to capture only traffic to/from the SPA3102, and of course you need
    to make sure that you run it on a box which will *see* that traffic.
    Your router is the best choice.
     
    David Woodhouse, Sep 16, 2012
    #9
  10. The answer to the second question answers the first too - run tcpdump on
    the router, which (if it's set up right) won't have the GUI that
    wireshark requires, and then copy the packets across to a desktop box
    for analysis.

    If your router can't run tcpdump, you're probably naffed. I suppose you
    could bodge together a dual-ethernet box to sit in front of the SPA and
    record everything that goes through it.
     
    Roger Burton West, Sep 16, 2012
    #10
  11. (PeteCresswell)

    Graham. Guest

    That would be a hub, although in the UK the term as been hijacked by
    certain people to mean something other than a hub.
     
    Graham., Sep 17, 2012
    #11
  12. (PeteCresswell)

    Graham. Guest

    But an intuitive work-around for anyone not confident in interpreting
    the results of your excellent idea.
     
    Graham., Sep 17, 2012
    #12
  13. I think Roger meant a computer acting as a router or a switch, with two
    Ethernet ports.

    But a hub would probably do the trick, if you can actually find one
    these days. An Ethernet hub will indiscriminately forward packets from
    one port out *all* its other ports (and hence your PC will see them).
    While an Ethernet switch would send them only to the *appropriate*
    output port, so something hanging off a different port will never see
    the traffic between the SPA and the router.
     
    David Woodhouse, Sep 17, 2012
    #13
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