Some thing on the News about ISP monitoring dnload Data

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Peter M, Jan 11, 2009.

  1. Peter  M

    Peter M Guest

    Is this coming to NZ, ? I know there is talk about OZZ, I think the Poms & US
    told them to get stuffed, as it would be so costly and to hard to monitor.

    Will it be assumed that Any dnloads from a P2P site will be copyrighted, I
    know for a fact that some musicians have posted some tracks on P2P sites, but
    also how about if these files are encrypted or even say a bunch of Rar files ,
    that are Key locked..

    Your thoughts on this..
     
    Peter M, Jan 11, 2009
    #1
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  2. Peter  M

    Gordon Guest

    The Internet is vehicle for data. Just like roads. what travels over it is
    another matter.

    Copyright is just fine, for even even Ms Penguin uses it. It is the
    conditions of that copyright which need to be enforced.

    Bittorrent is the way of data transfer for many. Pity Ms Windows thinks that
    she can serve the worldwide demand. Give her a cleaning cloth someone, her
    Vista is somewhat dirty.

    The irony is that after 2yrs, she knows this, and yet will not release the
    Bittorrent file.
     
    Gordon, Jan 11, 2009
    #2
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  3. Peter  M

    Peter Guest

    There are a few things going on here.

    In Aust, the govt is pulling a little PR stunt by bringing in nation wide
    net filtering (compulsory NetNanny stuff). They say it will stop all the
    nasty kiddy porn, but of course it won't (the baddies use chat rooms
    or private ftp, apparently). The real hazard is that it will become
    tempting for politicians to screen what citizens get to know, such
    as opposing political views.
    http://nocleanfeed.com/
    There was a similar move in UK, but I think the ISPs clubbed together
    to put in a token system, appeased the do gooder fanatics without
    actually doing anything.

    Another current event is changes to the NZ copyright law brought in by
    the previous Labour government. This appears to oblige ISPs to monitor
    and police the content of what you do on line. Again, this is not
    technically possible (eg encrypted links), but is likely to be effective at
    protecting revenue stream of corporates with obsolete business models
    (good for them, bad for us).
    http://creativefreedom.org.nz/
    http://it.gen.nz/2008/10/10/if-you-dont-like-the-copyright-act-join-up/

    There is also some stuff about ACTA, an international agreement on
    enforcing copyright. More about improving the lot of media corporates
    based on obsolete business models, while disadvantaging artists and
    consumers. Apparently one of the measures proposed is that officials can
    seize devices (ipods, laptops, etc) at the border if you can't prove
    everything on it is legit. (Do you carry the original cds of all that
    music with you when you travel?)
    http://coffee.geek.nz/content/080806/internet-nz-response-acta

    Certainly a fertile area internationally. Some important issues to
    be resolved, and the stakes are very high.
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122367645363324303.html


    Of course, P2P traffic isn't necessarily infringing copyright. For
    example, a lot of GPL and creative commons material is
    distributed this way. As you say, there are practical difficulties
    for an ISP trying to determine whether your traffic is legal or not.
    The problem is if the ISP is legally obliged to cut you off, just to
    be on the safe side.



    Peter
     
    Peter, Jan 11, 2009
    #3
  4. Peter  M

    Peter Guest

    also, the NZ govt seems to be trying to hide something with ACTA,
    trying to sneak it in for some reason.
    http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/news/6A826170E0EEDEB0CC25749A0037C661

    or maybe it is just incompetence on the part of those involved?
     
    Peter, Jan 11, 2009
    #4
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