Sigma/Foveon Questions

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Bubba, Apr 17, 2010.

  1. Bubba

    Guest Guest

    they're all spatial elements of an image.
    very few people do, but the number is the same.
     
    Guest, Apr 27, 2010
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  2. Bubba

    Guest Guest

    well put.
     
    Guest, Apr 27, 2010
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  3. []
    I prefer to think of the process as spatial interpolation of missing
    information, as upsizing may have a physical connotation, which could be
    confusing.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Apr 27, 2010
  4. Bubba

    Martin Brown Guest

    Are you another sock puppet of the P&S troll?
    You are *too* stupid for words. Clueless! I hope that my explanation is
    clear to anyone who actually wants to learn about the Bayer mask.

    The final image in a DSLR camera is always RGB format. There might be
    one somewhere that will do luminance as monochrome but it still requires
    data from multiple sensor sites to reconstruct that image.
    You really need to go back to basics. Whoever told you what you so
    fervently believe is completely out of step with imaging conventions.
    You are not a good advert for the quality of their teaching then.

    Regards,
    Martin Brown
    MBCS CEng
     
    Martin Brown, Apr 27, 2010
  5. But some pixels are more "complete" than others.
     
    Kennedy McEwen, Apr 27, 2010
  6. No size change need occur when you upsize an image from 3Mp to 12Mp
    either.
     
    Kennedy McEwen, Apr 27, 2010
  7. Only by your limited definition of pixel. I have already pointed you to
    the accepted reference which clearly states that there are several
    definitions of the term. Arguing that only one is valid is no better
    than arguing that one fairy story is truer than another.
     
    Kennedy McEwen, Apr 27, 2010
  8. Not necessarily. Pixel is derived from "picture element" not "spatial
    element". There can be several picture elements, ie. pixels, at exactly
    the same spatial co-ordinates of multispectral images. I work with some
    images which have 128 pixels with exactly the same spatial coordinates!
     
    Kennedy McEwen, Apr 27, 2010
  9. If it was made up then its quite amazing that others have made up the
    same things - and got them accepted on Wiki long before this debate. Not
    even you are stupid enough to suggest that.
    You have just spent most of the thread telling us that every spatial
    sample is a pixel whether it contains colour information or not.
    Consequently, even by your restricted definition, a sample at any
    spatial point in the image *IS* a pixel whether it is a colour sample or
    a monochrome one.
    Exactly, but this is the representation used in a Bayer CFA and hence
    the only representation of colour relevant to the subject.
    Nothing is obvious except your restricted view of the world - it is
    really much larger than what your blinkers let you see!
     
    Kennedy McEwen, Apr 27, 2010
  10. Bubba

    Guest Guest

    the word upsize means a bigger size. up-size. just as downsize means
    smaller.
     
    Guest, Apr 27, 2010
  11. Bubba

    Guest Guest

    yes it is, but it's spatial. it's the smallest part of an image, which
    is *not* one colour component, i.e., red. it's a monochrome sample, an
    rgb triplet, a cmyk quad, a hexachrome sextuplet, etc.

    foveon layers are unquestionably *not* separate pixels. the only people
    who claim they are is sigma, foveon and some of the users (not all,
    surprisingly).
    examples please.
     
    Guest, Apr 27, 2010
  12. Bubba

    dj_nme Guest

    It is a "filling in", not "up-sizing" that occurs.
    Bayer CFA demosaicing doesn't make the (in this limited example) the 3mp
    of green pixels (from the 12mp sensor) larger (ie: cover a bigger area,
    with bigger dimensions) in size, the "missing" green pixels from the
    rest of the 12mp image are filled out by the demosaicing algorithm.
     
    dj_nme, Apr 28, 2010
  13. Bubba

    Guest Guest

    exactly.
     
    Guest, Apr 28, 2010
  14. Bubba

    Ray Fischer Guest

    The P&S troll, like you, doesn't have a clue.
    "Declare victory".
    Wrong again, troll. RAW images are raw sensor data and do not contain
    RGB triples.

    No response. Facts confuse the troll.
    You seem to think that your fact-free whining constitutes some sort of
    a rebuttal.
    Your whining isn't a rebuttal. All it does is prove that you don't
    LIKE being shown up as an ignorant asshole.
     
    Ray Fischer, Apr 28, 2010
  15. Bubba

    Ray Fischer Guest

    That doesn't even make sense.
     
    Ray Fischer, Apr 28, 2010
  16. Bubba

    Ray Fischer Guest

    You seem to think that you can make up whatever definition you like.
    None of which agree with your lunacy.
    "Declare victory and run away."
     
    Ray Fischer, Apr 28, 2010
  17. Bubba

    Ray Fischer Guest

    You are an idiot.
     
    Ray Fischer, Apr 28, 2010
  18. Bubba

    Ray Fischer Guest

    p\Only when you're trying to justify your incorrect interpretation.
    That's not a pixel.
    That's not a pixel either.
    Becuase you're "confused".
    Quite well. I understand the difference between a pixel and the data
    used to represent the pixel. They're not the same thing.
     
    Ray Fischer, Apr 28, 2010
  19. Bubba

    Ray Fischer Guest

    None of which you actually cite.
    I have not.
    Thus your claim is, by your own admission, WRONG.
    It is not as you have pointed out several times. Bayer sensors use
    three different sensors to measure red, green, and blue intensity
    in an interleaved grid. Software then uses interpolation to determine
    the other color components for each pixel.
    Liars like you often try to justify yourself by trying to convince
    people that your bullshit is really just a different interpretation.
     
    Ray Fischer, Apr 28, 2010
  20. Bubba

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Only when you're trying to justify your incorrect interpretation.
    That's not a pixel.
    That's not a pixel either.
    Becuase you're "confused".
    Quite well. I understand the difference between a pixel and the data
    used to represent the pixel. They're not the same thing.
     
    Ray Fischer, Apr 28, 2010
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