Sigma 10-20mm wide angle stretching issues

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Destin_FL, Jun 8, 2006.

  1. Destin_FL

    Destin_FL Guest

    Hello all,
    I purchased the Sigma 10-20mm wide angle lens, and it a wonderful lens in most
    every way, and for sure incredibly wide.
    What I was not expecting however is how much it stretches things in the
    photographs towards the edges. Even up at 14 or 17 mm, it still stretches
    things terribly out of proportion towards the edges. Doesn't matter how far
    from the "view" I am; for instance could be interior shots and the furniture on
    the sides of the shot will be terribly distorted/stretched towards the edges, or
    out in a huge field; grasses, trees, whatever will be wacked out closer to the
    edge you get/see.

    Is this common to these super-wide lenses? Does anyone have familiarity with
    the wide 12-24mm Nikon lens? I'm wondering if it would be better... I do almost
    all interior real estate photography if somebody might have recommendations.

    Thanks for the help!

    Tim
     
    Destin_FL, Jun 8, 2006
    #1
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  2. Destin_FL

    Scooby Guest

    I can highly recommend the Nikkor (I've got one and it's lovely), but
    apparently if you want totally distortion-free images for architecture/real
    estate the venerable Sigma 12-24 4-5.6 is the way to go.
     
    Scooby, Jun 8, 2006
    #2
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  3. Destin_FL

    bmoag Guest

    There are two issues:
    One is an inherent effect such as you describe that will seem to distort
    off-axis image elements at the periphery when using extreme wide angle
    lenses.
    The other issue is barrel distortion which tends to be more noticeable at
    the edges and with straight lines parallel to the top or bottom of the
    frame.
    Barrel distortion is easily adjusted/corrected by a number of plug-ins or
    standalone programs but what looks best to you is better than merely
    accepting the "correction" dialed in by the program. DxO, and the PT plug-in
    for PS are examples of programs/plug-ins that purport to correct lens
    distortion based on a database of lens info. CS2 has simple sliders in the
    lens/distort filter that accomplish much the same thing.
     
    bmoag, Jun 8, 2006
    #3
  4. Destin_FL

    Destin_FL Guest

    Thanks for the help and suggestions, and from TomB.
    I'm using the D70... and PS CS2

    I had considered the Tokina, but after reading several reviews, the Sigma
    10-20mm kept being highly regarded. I'm wondering about that "stretching"
    effect in the Tokina and the Nikon 12-24 now... it isn't really barrel
    distortion, in fact the lens has almost zero distortion of any kind except
    whatever that weird stretching phenomenon is.
    Scooby, can you recall where you read or saw positive feedback about the Sigma
    12-24?

    Thanks again.

    Tim
     
    Destin_FL, Jun 8, 2006
    #4
  5. Have you seen this comparison review?
    http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/digital-wide-zooms/comparison.htm
    I recently picked up the Tokina and so far am happy with it for what I've
    used it for. A sample can be found at
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/dSLR/misc/slides/DSC_1225-02_800.html
    No correction applied.
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Jun 8, 2006
    #5
  6. Destin_FL

    Pat Guest

    They make specialize cameras for shooting like that -- to give you a
    wide perspective without distortion. But they are pricey. I haven't
    seen them lately, but they exist. Basically the whole thing swings on
    an axis.

    Another option is to take 2 or 3 pix and stitch them together.

    While you are shooting, zoom all of the way out (10 mm), get good and
    close to a co-worker, and focus on his/her nose. Then you will see
    distortion as well as having a good picture for the company Christmas
    party ;-))
     
    Pat, Jun 8, 2006
    #6
  7. Destin_FL

    Destin_FL Guest

    Thanks again to all, and thanks Ed... I ordered the Tokina a minute ago. That
    image (the LACK of stretching) is in a different league from the Sigma. That
    house/building over on the right side of your image would look twice that size,
    stretched out if taken with my Sigma. I'm convinced.

    Tim
     
    Destin_FL, Jun 9, 2006
    #7
  8. No.

    I know this reply is a bit late but since you apparently use a Nikon it
    won't make any difference.

    A friend of mine has the Sigma 10-20 while I have the Canon 10-22. His
    produces the terrible stretching on the edges but mine doesn't. The Canon
    is extremely well corrected for such a wide lens, and has a surprisingly
    "normal" look on most shots. Depending on composition, I can get very
    exaggerated perspectives with the Canon, but if I'm careful with my
    viewpoint and composition, many of my 10mm shots don't even look like
    ultrawide shots at first glance. I highly recommend this lens to Canon
    users.

    The Distort - Lens Correction - Remove Distortion feature in Photoshop is a
    quick and simple way of correcting wide-angle stretching. I've used it on a
    few of my friend's shots.

    Paul
     
    Paul Saunders, Jun 9, 2006
    #8
  9. Destin_FL

    Paul J Gans Guest

    I think you did the right thing. I've never used the Sigma
    but I have the Tokina and am very happy with it.

    --- Paul J. Gans
     
    Paul J Gans, Jun 10, 2006
    #9
  10. Glad to be a help. Enjoy.
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Jun 10, 2006
    #10
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