Send a message by voting for Nader

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Ron Hunter, Jun 20, 2004.

  1. Who?
    --
    V.G.

    Change pobox dot alaska to gci.
    "I wanted a car I could run down pedestrians with. But one with a comfy ride, like a sofa on wheels." - Father Haskell

    "No doubt about it, 9-11 was orchestrated by Lockheed." - *lexa 'connects the dots' ()
    (This sig file contains not less than 80% recycled SPAM)

    Sarcasm is my sword, Apathy is my shield.
     
    Vanilla Gorilla (Monkey Boy), Jun 24, 2004
    #61
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  2. Ron Hunter

    John Griffin Guest

    There's a joke about a deaf-mute panning Mozart in there
    somewhere.
     
    John Griffin, Jun 24, 2004
    #62
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  3. As if that makes you a decent person...
     
    Bill Reynolds, Jun 24, 2004
    #63
  4. Ron Hunter

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Higher, in fact. And I can flog you with degrees, too.

    But I thought you were leaving. Please get on with it.
     
    Phil Wheeler, Jun 24, 2004
    #64
  5. Ron Hunter

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Likely not, just more blather. It would be nice if he just carried out
    his promise and left!
     
    Phil Wheeler, Jun 24, 2004
    #65
  6. Ron Hunter

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    or perhaps an Enron energy broker.
     
    Phil Wheeler, Jun 24, 2004
    #66
  7. Ron Hunter

    bob Guest

    Sig file material!!!
     
    bob, Jun 24, 2004
    #67
  8. According to our own *Lexa, "Facts do not require evidence."
    --
    V.G.

    Change pobox dot alaska to gci.
    "I wanted a car I could run down pedestrians with. But one with a comfy ride, like a sofa on wheels." - Father Haskell

    "No doubt about it, 9-11 was orchestrated by Lockheed." - *lexa 'connects the dots' ()
    (This sig file contains not less than 80% recycled SPAM)

    Sarcasm is my sword, Apathy is my shield.
     
    Vanilla Gorilla (Monkey Boy), Jun 25, 2004
    #68
  9. As if it were even true...
    --
    V.G.

    Change pobox dot alaska to gci.
    "I wanted a car I could run down pedestrians with. But one with a comfy ride, like a sofa on wheels." - Father Haskell

    "No doubt about it, 9-11 was orchestrated by Lockheed." - *lexa 'connects the dots' ()
    (This sig file contains not less than 80% recycled SPAM)

    Sarcasm is my sword, Apathy is my shield.
     
    Vanilla Gorilla (Monkey Boy), Jun 25, 2004
    #69
  10. Ron Hunter

    digger Guest

    Why, it's Scott Nudds! Hey there, Nuddsey, you ol' git. Did you
    have to quit posting as yourself? It's just peachy to hear you've
    become a genius now. I'll be expecting some pearls!

    Tell us again how Stalin never murdered anyone?

    Happy Kook Day 2004, Scottie!

    Nuddsey's flight from Amerika is imminent, and always will be!
     
    digger, Jun 25, 2004
    #70
  11. Ron Hunter

    John Griffin Guest

    Your IQ has been measured here. It's between 80 and 90.

    Tell me you're just using your vast intelligence to create
    a retarded newsgroup persona. That would be really dumb.
     
    John Griffin, Jun 25, 2004
    #71
  12. Ron Hunter

    Mike Russell Guest

    The message is that the right of an individual to run for office is more
    important than who actually wins the presidency.
     
    Mike Russell, Jun 25, 2004
    #72
  13. I'm not a Fascist Bush supporter. That indicates that I am more decent than
    50% of the Amerian population.
     
    Vendicar Decarian, Jun 26, 2004
    #73
  14. Clearly you find your state of ignorance blissful.


    U.S. Is Losing Its Dominance in the Sciences
    By WILLIAM J. BROAD

    Published: May 3, 2004


    The United States has started to lose its worldwide dominance in
    critical areas of science and innovation, according to federal and
    private experts who point to strong evidence like prizes awarded to
    Americans and the number of papers in major professional journals.
    Foreign advances in basic science now often rival or even exceed
    America's, apparently with little public awareness of the trend or
    its implications for jobs, industry, national security or the vigor
    of the nation's intellectual and cultural life.

    "The rest of the world is catching up," said John E. Jankowski, a
    senior analyst at the National Science Foundation, the federal
    agency that tracks science trends. "Science excellence is no longer
    the domain of just the U.S."

    Even analysts worried by the trend concede that an expansion of the
    world's brain trust, with new approaches, could invigorate the fight
    against disease, develop new sources of energy and wrestle with
    knotty environmental problems. But profits from the breakthroughs
    are likely to stay overseas, and this country will face competition
    for things like hiring scientific talent and getting space to
    showcase its work in top journals.

    One area of international competition involves patents. Americans
    still win large numbers of them, but the percentage is falling as
    foreigners, especially Asians, have become more active and in some
    fields have seized the innovation lead. The United States' share of
    its own industrial patents has fallen steadily over the decades and
    now stands at 52 percent.

    A more concrete decline can be seen in published research. Physical
    Review, a series of top physics journals, recently tracked a
    reversal in which American papers, in two decades, fell from the
    most to a minority. Last year the total was just 29 percent, down
    from 61 percent in 1983.

    China, said Martin Blume, the journals' editor, has surged ahead by
    submitting more than 1,000 papers a year. "Other scientific
    publishers are seeing the same kind of thing," he added.

    Another downturn centers on the Nobel Prizes, an icon of scientific
    excellence. Traditionally, the United States, powered by heavy
    federal investments in basic research, the kind that pursues
    fundamental questions of nature, dominated the awards.
    But the American share, after peaking from the 1960's through the
    1990's, has fallen in the 2000's to about half, 51 percent. The rest
    went to Britain, Japan, Russia, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland and New
    Zealand.

    "We are in a new world, and it's increasingly going to be dominated
    by countries other than the United States," Denis Simon, dean of
    management and technology at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,
    recently said at a scientific meeting in Washington.

    Europe and Asia are ascendant, analysts say, even if their
    achievements go unnoticed in the United States. In March, for
    example, European scientists announced that one of their planetary
    probes had detected methane in the atmosphere of Mars - a possible
    sign that alien microbes live beneath the planet's surface. The
    finding made headlines from Paris to Melbourne. But most Americans,
    bombarded with images from America's own rovers successfully
    exploring the red planet, missed the foreign news.

    More aggressively, Europe is seeking to dominate particle physics by
    building the world's most powerful atom smasher, set for its debut
    in 2007. Its circular tunnel is 17 miles around.

    Science analysts say Asia's push for excellence promises to be even
    more challenging.

    "It's unbelievable," Diana Hicks, chairwoman of the school of public
    policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology, said of Asia's growth
    in science and technical innovation. "It's amazing to see these
    output numbers of papers and patents going up so fast."

    Analysts say comparative American declines are an inevitable result
    of rising standards of living around the globe.

    "It's all in the ebb and flow of globalization," said Jack Fritz, a
    senior officer at the National Academy of Engineering, an advisory
    body to the federal government. He called the declines "the next big
    thing we will have to adjust to."

    The rapidly changing American status has not gone unnoticed by
    politicians, with Democrats on the attack and the White House on the
    defensive.
     
    Vendicar Decarian, Jun 26, 2004
    #74
  15. So long Suckers...

    U.S. Is Losing Its Dominance in the Sciences
    By WILLIAM J. BROAD

    Published: May 3, 2004

    The United States has started to lose its worldwide dominance in
    critical areas of science and innovation, according to federal and
    private experts who point to strong evidence like prizes awarded to
    Americans and the number of papers in major professional journals.
    Foreign advances in basic science now often rival or even exceed
    America's, apparently with little public awareness of the trend or
    its implications for jobs, industry, national security or the vigor
    of the nation's intellectual and cultural life.

    "The rest of the world is catching up," said John E. Jankowski, a
    senior analyst at the National Science Foundation, the federal
    agency that tracks science trends. "Science excellence is no longer
    the domain of just the U.S."

    Even analysts worried by the trend concede that an expansion of the
    world's brain trust, with new approaches, could invigorate the fight
    against disease, develop new sources of energy and wrestle with
    knotty environmental problems. But profits from the breakthroughs
    are likely to stay overseas, and this country will face competition
    for things like hiring scientific talent and getting space to
    showcase its work in top journals.

    One area of international competition involves patents. Americans
    still win large numbers of them, but the percentage is falling as
    foreigners, especially Asians, have become more active and in some
    fields have seized the innovation lead. The United States' share of
    its own industrial patents has fallen steadily over the decades and
    now stands at 52 percent.

    A more concrete decline can be seen in published research. Physical
    Review, a series of top physics journals, recently tracked a
    reversal in which American papers, in two decades, fell from the
    most to a minority. Last year the total was just 29 percent, down
    from 61 percent in 1983.

    China, said Martin Blume, the journals' editor, has surged ahead by
    submitting more than 1,000 papers a year. "Other scientific
    publishers are seeing the same kind of thing," he added.

    Another downturn centers on the Nobel Prizes, an icon of scientific
    excellence. Traditionally, the United States, powered by heavy
    federal investments in basic research, the kind that pursues
    fundamental questions of nature, dominated the awards.
    But the American share, after peaking from the 1960's through the
    1990's, has fallen in the 2000's to about half, 51 percent. The rest
    went to Britain, Japan, Russia, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland and New
    Zealand.

    "We are in a new world, and it's increasingly going to be dominated
    by countries other than the United States," Denis Simon, dean of
    management and technology at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,
    recently said at a scientific meeting in Washington.

    Europe and Asia are ascendant, analysts say, even if their
    achievements go unnoticed in the United States. In March, for
    example, European scientists announced that one of their planetary
    probes had detected methane in the atmosphere of Mars - a possible
    sign that alien microbes live beneath the planet's surface. The
    finding made headlines from Paris to Melbourne. But most Americans,
    bombarded with images from America's own rovers successfully
    exploring the red planet, missed the foreign news.

    More aggressively, Europe is seeking to dominate particle physics by
    building the world's most powerful atom smasher, set for its debut
    in 2007. Its circular tunnel is 17 miles around.

    Science analysts say Asia's push for excellence promises to be even
    more challenging.

    "It's unbelievable," Diana Hicks, chairwoman of the school of public
    policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology, said of Asia's growth
    in science and technical innovation. "It's amazing to see these
    output numbers of papers and patents going up so fast."

    Analysts say comparative American declines are an inevitable result
    of rising standards of living around the globe.

    "It's all in the ebb and flow of globalization," said Jack Fritz, a
    senior officer at the National Academy of Engineering, an advisory
    body to the federal government. He called the declines "the next big
    thing we will have to adjust to."

    The rapidly changing American status has not gone unnoticed by
    politicians, with Democrats on the attack and the White House on the
    defensive.
     
    Vendicar Decarian, Jun 26, 2004
    #75
  16. So long Suckers...

    Some federal workers have fake degrees

    GAO says dozens of employees have bogus diplomasThe Associated Press
    Updated: 10:38 a.m. ET May 11, 2004WASHINGTON -

    At least 28 senior-level
    federal employees in eight agencies have bogus college degrees, including
    three
    managers at the office that oversees nuclear weapons safety, congressional
    investigators have found.

    The problem is likely even bigger, mainly because the government has no
    uniform
    way to check whether employees' alma maters are "diploma mills" that require
    little, if any, academic work, the General Accounting Office reported.
    The findings by the investigative arm of Congress were to be presented to a
    Senate committee Tuesday.

    An earlier GAO report revealed how easy it is to buy a degree from a diploma
    mill; this one shows high-level federal workers securing such degrees at
    taxpayer expense. The tally was $169,471 at just two of the schools.
    The colleges in question often use names similar to those of accredited
    schools
    and offer degrees largely on a person's "life experience." Some simply sell
    degrees for a flat fee.

    Among those with bogus degrees in the GAO review were three workers with
    emergency operations roles and security clearances at the National Nuclear
    Security Administration, part of the Department of Energy.

    One of those workers paid $5,000 for a master's degree from LaSalle
    University,
    an unaccredited school, the report said. He attended no classes, took no
    tests
    and told the GAO his degree was "a joke."

    Under law, the federal government may only pay tuition for academic degree
    training at schools sanctioned by a recognized accrediting body.

    In contacting representatives of three diploma mills, an undercover GAO
    investigator found they would not permit enrolling in individual courses.
    Yet
    they were willing to change their billing practices to receive federal
    money,
    dividing the flat fee they charged by the number of courses a student needed
    to
    appear as if a per-course fee was charged.

    The number of bogus degrees and the amount of tax dollars spent on them are
    likely understated across the government because of incomplete records and
    verifications, the GAO said.

    Three unaccredited schools - Pacific Western University, California Coast
    University and Kennedy-Western University - provided data showing that 463
    of
    their students were federal employees. Most of those listed were in the
    Department of Defense. The report did not name employees.

    The investigation took place from July 2003 through February.

    The Senate Governmental Affairs Committee planned hearings Tuesday and
    Wednesday
    on diploma mills and the taxpayer's role in subsidizing them.

    Copyright 2004 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may
    not
    be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
     
    Vendicar Decarian, Jun 26, 2004
    #76
  17. Ron Hunter

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Ah .. so you are one of THOSE.

    When are you taking your degrees and going?

    Phil
     
    Phil Wheeler, Jun 26, 2004
    #77
  18. Certainly RepuliKKKans don't need any.
     
    Vendicar Decarian, Jun 26, 2004
    #78
  19. I'm guessing he won't have any trouble finding someone to drive him to
    the airport. There may even already be a waiting list.
    --
    V.G.

    Change pobox dot alaska to gci.
    "I wanted a car I could run down pedestrians with. But one with a comfy ride, like a sofa on wheels." - Father Haskell

    "No doubt about it, 9-11 was orchestrated by Lockheed." - *lexa 'connects the dots' ()
    (This sig file contains not less than 80% recycled SPAM)

    Sarcasm is my sword, Apathy is my shield.
     
    Vanilla Gorilla (Monkey Boy), Jun 26, 2004
    #79
  20. Ron Hunter

    Mike Russell Guest

    Vanilla Gorilla (Monkey Boy) wrote:
    [re brain drain]
    Yes, PhD's who want jobs as taxi drivers.
     
    Mike Russell, Jun 26, 2004
    #80
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