SATA Hard Drives

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Jeff L, Oct 4, 2003.

  1. Jeff L

    Jeff L Guest

    I have a Maxtor SATA 160GB hard drive, and the documentation explains
    that the drive may be powered by either the 15-pin SATA power
    connector (that only few power supplies have), or the legacy 4-pin
    standard power connector.

    What are the advantages of using the 15-pin as opposed to the 4-pin?

    Thanks,
    Jeff
     
    Jeff L, Oct 4, 2003
    #1
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  2. I tossed a new PS in the box, last month, and it[1] had a few different
    connectors than what I'd seen, before. I think one of them is for a
    blender or coffee maker. <g> My question is this: what the heck does a
    *power* feed need 15 lines for?

    [1] Antec TruePower 480W
     
    Blinky the Shark, Oct 4, 2003
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  3. Jeff L

    why? Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    Does it matter? Without getting into paired gnd returns next to power?
    Low power / portable, the legacy connector only has 5/12V and not 3.3.

    Check the SATA docs at Maxtor and specs at http://www.serialata.org/

    Me
     
    why?, Oct 4, 2003
    #3
  4. Jeff L

    why? Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    http://www.serialata.org/collateral/zipdownloads/serialata10a.ZIP
    2.6MB

    3x3.3V (portables) , 5xGND , 3x12V , 3x5V and reserved. Some of these
    are called 1st / 2nd mate.

    I guess by looking at the different length pins / GNDs 1st mate there is
    an initial gnd connect on cable insertion and an initial voltage (the
    pre-charge) 2nd mate.

    Doh!! See pg47 of the PDF from the URL

    Me
     
    why?, Oct 4, 2003
    #4
  5. Interesting re the portables. I have one, but I don't "think laptop"
    when I'm thinking about drives for my desktop.
    Thanks. Makes sense.

    With all those 1st and 2nd mates in there, it sounds like you're either
    Navy or Australian. :)
     
    Blinky the Shark, Oct 5, 2003
    #5
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