Samsung Ships the First Blu-Ray Player

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Tarkus, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. Tarkus

    Tarkus Guest

    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1895,1977327,00.asp

    Samsung Ships the First Blu-Ray Player
    06.15.06
    By Dan Costa

    The format war between Blu-Ray and HD-DVD has finally reached consumers,
    now that Samsung is shipping the BD-P1000 Blu-Ray player to retailers.
    The BD-P1000 ($999.99 list), will go on sale June 25th, making it the
    first Blu-Ray player to hit the market. Until now, the only
    high-definition video player shoppers could buy has been the Toshiba
    HD-A1, which has been in short supply.

    The BD-P1000 is twice the price of the HD-A1, but Jim Sanduski, senior
    vice president of marketing for Samsung's Audio and Video Products Group,
    says that won't hurt sales. "Dealer demand is really strong," Sanduski
    says. "Yes, we are double the price of HD-DVD, but we are confident
    people will buy as many as we can build."

    The Samsung BD-P1000 supports full 1080p playback, something the first
    generation of HD-DVD players do not. The BD-P1000 also up-converts
    conventional DVDs to 1080p to improve video quality. The player comes
    with HDMI, Component, S-video, and composite outputs. Samsung has also
    included a 10-in-2 multi-memory-card interface for viewing digital images
    directly from flash cards.

    There will be just 10 Blu-Ray titles available when the BD-P100 ships,
    including 50 First Dates, The Fifth Element, Hitch, House of Flying
    Daggers, A Knight's Tale, The Last Waltz, Resident Evil Apocalypse, and
    xXx. Sanduski says by the end of year the number of titles will swell to
    as many as 200.

    This is one area where Blu-Ray could have a potential advantage over
    HD-DVD. "Eighty-four percent of all the movies released last year were
    made by studios that have announced support for Blu-Ray," according to
    Sanduski. "That is a huge strike against HD-DVD." To be fair, some
    studios plan to release movies on both Blu-Ray and HD-DVD.

    Samsung's BD-P1000 release comes as other Blu-Ray manufactures have
    pushed back their launch dates. Both Sony and Pioneer initially planned
    to offer Blu-Ray players in June, but have pushed their U.S. launch dates
    to August and September, respectively.

    Movies on Blu-Ray discs will sell for about $30, according to Sanduski.
    He compares that to the healthy premium people paid over VHS when DVDs
    first came out. HD-DVD titles currently sell for about $20.

    Sanduski says that the Blu-Ray prices will come down quickly once other
    manufacturers bring their players to market. "There are nine
    manufacturers building Blu-Ray devices," according to Sanduski. "There is
    only one building HD-DVD drives: Toshiba."

    The BD-P1000 will be sold at more than 200 retail locations, including
    Best Buy, Tweeter, and Circuit City.
     
    Tarkus, Jun 15, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Went to my local Wal-Mart last night and as I always do I checked their
    inventory of HD-DVD players and discs. For the last 20 days they've
    had 2 boxed players (none displayed) and the first spate of titles,
    including one copy of Serenity (the only one I was really interested
    in). At first I thought someone had bought one as their was only one
    boxed player left and Serenity was gone. No such luck, found the
    player hooked up to a 42 inch plasma on an end cap display, and what do
    you know, the copy of Serenity was there too. Did give me a chance to
    try it out though, and I wasn't really that impressed. I'm sure it
    would have looked better on my set at home, which is not only a CRT,
    but properly calibrated to boot.

    Just reinforced my theory that Blu Ray will eventually win this war,
    and the improvement is not worth paying the big $$$ until prices come
    down. Looking forward to the $100 Apex Blu Ray player that Wal-Mart
    will inevitably sell.

    -beaumon
     
    lorincantrell, Jun 16, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Tarkus

    wandrinandz Guest

    consumers...

    Oh, yeah... what they didn't announce is that Samsung also have a combo
    hd-dvd and bluray player in development for release early next year. Talk
    about loyal support for bluray. The thing that I cannot get through to
    people is that bluray is not that different from hd-dvd, yet is more
    expensive. The results are the same, and hd-dvd can be easily upgraded to
    1080p should the need arise. Not likely here in blighty. Where did all the
    dvd enthusiasts go that were around in 1997/98, at least they were sensible
    and knew what they were buying.
     
    wandrinandz, Jun 17, 2006
    #3
  4. Tarkus

    Joshua Zyber Guest

    Actually, Samsung dropped their plans for a combi player, citing
    contractual and legal complications. Currently, LG is the only company
    still pursuing plans for a combi player.
    This part I agree with.
     
    Joshua Zyber, Jun 17, 2006
    #4
  5. Tarkus

    asj Guest

    Uh, yeah...sure.....

    Blu-ray has the ability to run applications while HD-DVD is a plain
    jane (therefore Blu-ray has much better interactive capabilities), it
    will have significantly more storage than HD-DVD (TDK is testing a 200
    GB disc and has run a 100 GB disc), and it is backed by a lot more
    studios (therefore, much more content available) and
    manufacturers....uh, yeah, you buy that dodo HD-DVD now ya hear?
     
    asj, Jun 17, 2006
    #5
  6. Tarkus

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest

    My player gets online extras from the LAM connection, when attached.

    If a disc has interactive features, it can access them.

    This includes standard DVDs.
     
    Roy L. Fuchs, Jun 17, 2006
    #6
  7. Tarkus

    Joshua Zyber Guest

    Who gives a flying crap? People who want to play computer games will do
    so on their computer, not their movie player.
    They can't even get 50 GB discs to work right. This argument is a red
    herring anyway. Even if these theoretical 200 GB discs could be made to
    work in a lab, the players themselves are limited to only dual-layer 50
    GB playback.
    Maybe true today. Let's check back in a year, shall we?
     
    Joshua Zyber, Jun 18, 2006
    #7
  8. Tarkus

    asj Guest

    The way things are going for HDDVD, they may not have a year ;-)
     
    asj, Jun 18, 2006
    #8
  9. Tarkus

    Jay G. Guest

    I'm sorry, but that statement invalidates a lot of your own arguments.
    Problems producing dual-layer Blu-Ray discs? Check back in a year. The
    price of Blu-Ray players? Check back in a year. The number of titles
    available? Check back in a year.

    Basically, any problem you have with Blu-Ray *now* is invalid because you
    don't know what the situation will be like a year from now.

    -Jay
     
    Jay G., Jun 18, 2006
    #9
  10. Tarkus

    Jay G. Guest

    Samsung has backed out of that device. And "loyalty" by the manufacturers
    isn't as critical as the backing from the studios. People are going to buy
    a HD format for the content, not necessarily the hardware brand.
    The *players* are more expensive, not the discs. And the PS3 will be
    capable of playing back Blu-Ray movies at the same price-point as the
    cheapy Toshiba.

    Blu-ray's not terribly different, but it is different. Blu-Ray does have
    60% more storage capabilities, which may or may not become a factor.

    The larger factor would be in terms of support by manufacturers and
    studios. Here, Blu-Ray has an edge.
    Really? Existing HD DVD players can be easily upgraded to 1080p? Why
    don't they do that then?
    They were buying a new video format that may or may not succeed, but at
    least had a good level of support. And even then, a few chose to purchase
    DIVX.

    -Jay
     
    Jay G., Jun 18, 2006
    #10
  11. Tarkus

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest


    Hahahahaa... You're funny. Yes, I do.

    There will have been several hundred thousand HD discs sold, and
    several tens of thousands of players sold.

    The fact is that YOU are the twit that doesn't know where things are
    going.
     
    Roy L. Fuchs, Jun 18, 2006
    #11
  12. Tarkus

    Jay G. Guest

    There have been several hundred thousand UMD movie discs sold, but that
    hasn't stopped it from becoming pretty much a dead format.

    And you don't *know* that those numbers are actually true, you're just
    giving a biased guess.

    -Jay
     
    Jay G., Jun 19, 2006
    #12
  13. Tarkus

    GMAN Guest

    There will be more Blu Ray players sold on day one of Playstation 3's release
    than there will have been from the entire couple of months that HD-DVD has been
    out.
     
    GMAN, Jun 19, 2006
    #13
  14. Tarkus

    AZ Nomad Guest


    Yeah, if they get enough of them out there should be at last ten that still
    work at any given moment.
     
    AZ Nomad, Jun 19, 2006
    #14
  15. Tarkus

    Jay G. Guest

    Do you no of any actually problems with the PS3's reliability, or are you
    just making baseless accusations?

    -Jay
     
    Jay G., Jun 20, 2006
    #15
  16. Tarkus

    AZ Nomad Guest

    I remember what a piece of shit dvd player the PS2's had.

    How many living rooms in america are using PS2 as their primary DVD player?
    Why should anybody expect PS3s to do a similar role?
     
    AZ Nomad, Jun 20, 2006
    #16
  17. Tarkus

    Roy L. Fuchs Guest


    Not only that but what utter idiot would decrease the gameplay time
    of a console game by using up it laser/player to play film content?

    It's a guaranteed reduced/costly lifespan for the console.
     
    Roy L. Fuchs, Jun 21, 2006
    #17
  18. Tarkus

    Jay G. Guest

    So that's a "no, I don't know of any actual problems with the PS3."
    I know of at least two people that still use their PS2 as the only DVD
    player they have hooked up to their TV. When the PS2 first came out, this
    was a lot more common.
    Because it's going to be the cheapest Blu-Ray player out there.

    -Jay
     
    Jay G., Jun 21, 2006
    #18
  19. Tarkus

    Jay G. Guest

    Someone who doesn't want to pay another $200 for a High-Def disc player
    like you did.
    By the time the console dies, the price for a new PS3 and standalone
    Blu-Ray players will have significantly dropped in price.

    -Jay
     
    Jay G., Jun 21, 2006
    #19
  20. Tarkus

    GMAN Guest

    So did the first Xbox. Both had defective drives at first, That was quickly
    remedied.
     
    GMAN, Jun 21, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.