Sample Q&A 70-310: is it correct?

Discussion in 'MCSD' started by Greg Burns, Sep 15, 2003.

  1. Greg Burns

    Greg Burns Guest

    Q: The requirements that you have been given are that it needs to support
    asynchronous methods and be able to be accessed by non-Windows clients.

    Which type of .NET applicaton should you develop for the rewrite?

    XML Web Service or .NET Remoting?


    A: The correct answer is: ".NET Remoting."

    In order for the application to be accessible by non-Windows clients then
    ..NET Remoting is the best choice from the options given.

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/d...-us/cpguide/html/cpconnetremotingoverview.asp


    I thought "non-Windows clients" was a dead giveaway for Web Service. Any
    thoughts?

    Thanks,
    Greg
     
    Greg Burns, Sep 15, 2003
    #1
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  2. For the 70-300 Architecture exam, the answer would be XML Web Service. I
    would hope MS is consistent here.
     
    General Protection Fault, Sep 15, 2003
    #2
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  3. Greg Burns

    Maria Guest

    Q: The requirements that you have been given are that it
    needs to support asynchronous methods and be able to be
    accessed by non-Windows clients.
    Which type of .NET applicaton should you develop for the
    rewrite?
    XML Web Service or .NET Remoting?
    -----------------

    The question does not rule out remoting; you need more
    information to make the best choice. For example if you
    need peer-to-peer conversations and stateful objects then
    maybe remoting (using the SOAP formatter) would be
    the 'best' answer after all.

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?
    url=/library/en-us/dndotnet/html/dotnetremotearch.asp

    http://www.ondotnet.com/pub/a/dotnet/2002/10/07/webservices
    ..html

    Maria
     
    Maria, Sep 16, 2003
    #3
  4. Greg Burns

    Kline Sphere Guest

    The question does not rule out remoting; you need more
    The information was given, 'accessed by non-Windows clients', thus
    ruling out remoting.
     
    Kline Sphere, Sep 16, 2003
    #4
  5. Greg Burns

    Maria Guest

    The information was given, 'accessed by non-Windows
    I agree that you would normally only consider Remoting if
    both endpoints are Windows. But I am not yet convinced
    that a non-Windows client automatically rules out remoting.
    Here is an example that suggests to me that a Java client
    is possible - and yes I noticed that they use the Java
    equivalent of a .NET object:

    [JP Morgan deploye .NET remoting]
    www.intrinsyc.com/pdfs/news/JPMttwFeb10.pdf

    Going back to Greg Burns' question, yes I do accept that a
    Web service would probably be the 'correct' answer.
     
    Maria, Sep 16, 2003
    #5
  6. Greg Burns

    Kline Sphere Guest

    But I am not yet convinced
    I can't see microsoft 'promoting' Java, can you?
     
    Kline Sphere, Sep 16, 2003
    #6
  7. Maria, the article you pointed out
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dndotnet/html/dotnetremotearch.asp
    stated this:
    Interoperability
    ==========
    A recurring Microsoft message is that if you need interoperability between
    heterogeneous systems, then a Web services approach that uses open standards
    (SOAP, XML, HTTP) is the right choice, and the use of .NET Remoting is never
    an interop solution. For homogeneous systems where all participants are CLR
    managed, .NET Remoting may be the right choice. This is a pretty broad
    brush, but a useful distinction to make. Clients of .NET remoted objects
    need to be .NET clients. If your functionality has to be addressable over
    the Web (by Web, here I mean Internet) by loosely coupled SOAP clients (for
    example, a Unix process), then Web services are the correct choice. The
    intranet, of course, is not subject to the same limitations: All clients may
    be .NET clients and in this configuration .NET Remoting is not precluded.
    Similarly, for an environment where the middle (app) tier is behind a
    firewall and communicates with the Web tier directly, .NET Remoting may
    still be an option.

    Now, there is the Linux version of .NET being developed, but Microsoft
    doesn't want us to acknowledge that.

    ..NET remoting is MS's answer to the nastiness of DCOM. I believe it was
    developed with intranets and security (port 80) in mind. I also believe that
    web services were developed for interoperability in mind. I can write a
    Windows/Linux/Unix/MF client application that will make a call to a web
    service running on a Windows/Linux/Unix/MF server. EDI is too goofy to use
    so we now use XML.

    True, there are several articles on how to host it on IIS, but you still
    must communicate with .NET remoting channels (TCP or HTTP). You need to .NET
    libraries to use Remoting.

    Just some thoughts.
    Davin Mickelson

     
    Davin Mickelson, Sep 16, 2003
    #7
  8. Greg Burns

    Greg Burns Guest

    If anyone is interested, that question was from the PrepLogic exam that came
    with the ExamCram2 book for 70-310.

    The book is very good (I haven't really noticed any errors). The included
    PrepLogic disc contains 60 questions (not the same Qs as in the text). I
    swear I had an issue with EVERY SINGLE ONE!

    Taking the test tomorrow. Maybe by then I can forget everything their
    "prep" software taught me. ;^)

    Greg
     
    Greg Burns, Sep 16, 2003
    #8
  9. Greg Burns

    Maria Guest

    [waving a white flag] - You are right...
    I had read the article, but was trying to make the point
    that cross-platform functionality is not ruled out in
    principle.
    It *is* ruled out in practice and of course it is a no-no
    on the exams.
    Did you notice I had already capitulated ;o) ?

    Maria
     
    Maria, Sep 16, 2003
    #9
  10. Whoops...

    BTW - Cool word!
    I had to look that one m-w.com

    Always increasing the vocabulary...
    Davin

     
    Davin Mickelson, Sep 16, 2003
    #10
  11. Greg Burns

    ee Guest

    I thought "non-Windows clients" was a dead giveaway for Web Service. Any
    of course! .Net Remoting is NOT compatible with any non-Windows platform. We
    might see mono (linux) compatibility someday, but we're not there yet.

    Web Services (which are a custom type of Remoting) are muti-platform
    compatible.
     
    ee, Sep 24, 2003
    #11
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