Resolution resolution

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Simon, Feb 26, 2004.

  1. Simon

    Simon Guest

    I have recently purchased a cheap (£49.99 in the sale) 2MP camera
    (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00008IHCJ/026-3207365-6314824). I
    am quite happy with the snaps I have taken - about 30 so far. However, I
    have confused myself by borrowing a couple of "How to" books from the
    library!

    They all say 72 dpi resolution is fine for the screen and it looks OK. Here
    is an example at the camera's lowest setting (800x600 and cropped in PSP)
    for use on the web http://mands.v21hosting.co.uk/alfaromeo/images/156.jpg at
    72 dpi (as reported by Paint Shop Pro). However, they go on to say, when you
    print you should use 200 or 300 dpi at least - without saying how this
    should be achieved. In Paint Sho Pro or Photoshop(?) I can change the dpi in
    the image information, but does that actually give me more resolution? Is
    that what I should do before I print an image? I am wary of getting
    something for nothing.

    Also I presume I should increase the dpi before I begin digitally retouching
    the photo if I intend to print it?

    Cheers!
    Simon
     
    Simon, Feb 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. Simon

    Don Stauffer Guest

    Don't worry about dpi/ppi until you are ready to print. Many photo
    editors default to showing as much of image on screen as display will
    provide, and you can always zoom in when working on details.

    For printing, consensus of group awhile ago ranged from 200 to 300
    pixels per inch. I personally lean towards lower value. You will
    probably notice falloff in sharpness when printing with less than 200,
    while going above 300 will typically not gain you anything.
     
    Don Stauffer, Feb 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. You can gain something by increasing the number of pixels - up to about 2X -
    with PSP or PS. The one procedure you should do before increasing the
    number of pixels is cropping. Otherwise, just figure the print size in
    inches by dividing the number of pixels in the width or height of the image
    (whichever is smaller) by 200. Set up the print at that size. For some
    subjects, such as general scenery, you can get quite acceptable prints at
    150 ppi.
     
    Marvin Margoshes, Feb 26, 2004
    #3
  4. Simon

    Bob Dunlop Guest

    Bob Dunlop, Feb 26, 2004
    #4
  5. Simon

    Simon Guest


    Thanks chaps!
     
    Simon, Feb 27, 2004
    #5
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