replies

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by slumpy, Aug 6, 2003.

  1. slumpy

    slumpy Guest

    "So, Mr Slumpy you *really* are the perpetual comedian, aren't you ?" I
    threw back my head and roared with laughter as irenemccallum continued:
    IHBT
    IHBT
    IHBT
    IHBT
    IHBT
    IHBT
    IHBT
    IHBT

    Doh !!
     
    slumpy, Aug 6, 2003
    #1
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  2. hi, id ont know how to reply to a person. group is ok but what do i do for
    person.
    got thing with internet mail and mictosoft mail and other things . donnt
    know which to pick.
     
    irenemccallum, Aug 6, 2003
    #2
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  3. slumpy

    Brian H¹© Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    irenemccallum said:
    Right click the message you want to reply to and choose reply to sender, or,
    click on the icon next to reply group, yes the one marked reply.
    But you don't really want to reply to someone in a usenet post who has a munged
    address do you?
     
    Brian H¹©, Aug 6, 2003
    #3
  4. slumpy

    Osprey Guest

    Glad you can understand these foriegn languages:-0

    Osprey
     
    Osprey, Aug 6, 2003
    #4
  5. slumpy

    Mcploppy © Guest

    Osprey bashed at the keyboard and said :
    can't beat a bit of top and bottom posting to throw you of the dcent ;-)
     
    Mcploppy ©, Aug 6, 2003
    #5
  6. slumpy

    Brian H¹© Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    Mcploppy © said:
    I agree :-D
     
    Brian H¹©, Aug 6, 2003
    #6
  7. slumpy

    Unknown Guest

    Sure it is. They speak english in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland all
    of which are in Europe.
     
    Unknown, Aug 6, 2003
    #7
  8. slumpy

    Brian H¹© Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    Unknown said:
    No, they are in Great Britain.
    As I am in England, for me, English is not a foreign language.
     
    Brian H¹©, Aug 6, 2003
    #8
  9. slumpy

    Unknown Guest

    Great Britain is not in Europe???
     
    Unknown, Aug 6, 2003
    #9
  10. slumpy

    Brian H¹© Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    Unknown said:
    Give it a rest, this was dragged to exhaustion the other day.
    No Britain is not in Europe, Europe is a continent, Britain is a group of
    islands west of Europe.
     
    Brian H¹©, Aug 6, 2003
    #10
  11. slumpy

    Brian H¹© Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    Unknown said:
    I didn't say that, I said that Britain is not *in* Europe. Europe is a
    continent.
    Madagascar is not in Africa.
    Sicily is not in Italy.
    Tasmania is not in Australia.
    Corsica is not in France.
    Hawaii is not in America.
    Newfoundland is not in Canada.
    They may all be governed by those mainlands that they neighbour, but they are
    not *IN* them.

    The EEC stands for Europe Economic Community, not the same as Europe.
     
    Brian H¹©, Aug 6, 2003
    #11
  12. slumpy

    DC Guest

    Europe is incontinent?! Dammit! I moved here to get _away_ from you people!
     
    DC, Aug 6, 2003
    #12
  13. slumpy

    Brian H¹© Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    Brian H¹© said:
    European Economic Community
     
    Brian H¹©, Aug 6, 2003
    #13
  14. slumpy

    Brian H¹© Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    DC said:
    And I just realised that "unknown" is Bullis, so there is no way he will
    understand the difference between being part of a European community and being
    *in* Europe.
    Damn, he can't even understand "slash your wrists".
     
    Brian H¹©, Aug 6, 2003
    #14
  15. slumpy

    ilmc Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    Unknown typed:
    <snip>
    No man is an Iland, intire of it selfe;
    every man ia a peece of the Continent,
    a part of the maine;
    if a Clod bee washed away by the Sea,
    Europe is the lesse, as well as if a Promontorie were,
    as well as if a Manor of thy friends or of thine owne were;
    (this bit O.T)
    any mans death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankind;
    And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls;
    It tolls for thee.
    (John Donne)
    ( Typed as faithully as I can manage at this time of
    night/inebriation(sic/hic))
     
    ilmc, Aug 7, 2003
    #15
  16. Since you seem intent on picking nits, I shall give you a taste of your
    own medicine.

    Firstly, part of the province of Newfoundland, the bit known as
    Labrador, _is_ part of mainland Canada.

    Also, Europe's designation as a continent is highly suspect, since it's
    really only an overgrown peninsula tacked on to the butt-end of Asia,
    and left such as a nod to its socio-historical importance. If the
    geographic definition of a continent were to be applied to that
    landmass, we currently have Eurasia, and, prior to the Suez Canal
    severing it, we had Eurafrasia, one contiguous landmass. It might take
    you a while, but it is possible (or was before the Suez) to travel from
    The Cape of Good Hope to Nordkapp, Norway entirely on land, thus
    meeting the definition of a continent.
     
    Max Quordlepleen, Aug 7, 2003
    #16
  17. All of the above statements are wrong, although one is also right.
    "Italy" "France", and "Canada" are geopolitical, not geographical
    entities. "Australia" is both. Sicily _is_ part of the la Repubblica
    d'Italia, Tasmania _is_ a state of the Commonwealth of Australia.
    "Corsica _is_ a département of la République Francaise, and
    Newfoundland _is_ a province of the Dominion of Canada. With the
    exception of Australia, none of the geopolitical entities you mention
    are islands, therefore they have no geopraphical existence in and of
    themselves, outside of their politically defined borders, and those
    borders include the islands you mention.

    If you're going to be pedantic, try to be correct as well.
     
    Max Quordlepleen, Aug 7, 2003
    #17
  18. slumpy

    Brian H¹© Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    Max Quordlepleen said:
    The point I was trying to make to RtS was, that as islands lying off the coasts
    of those countries, they are not *in* the countries.
     
    Brian H¹©, Aug 7, 2003
    #18

  19. And you're *STILL* completely wrong. Those islands _are_ part of their
    respective countries. You were the one who tried to split semantic
    hairs, and only managed to demonstrate your own ignorance, making
    dogmatic assertions that were all spectacularly wrong. A "country",
    any country, is a geopolitical, NOT a geographical entity. Countries
    only exist as such because somebody said "this country starts here,
    finishes here, and includes all this in between". Each of the islands
    you mention *IS* in the country listed next to it. I am sure that the
    distinction between geographical and geopolitical will continue to
    elude you, but mull on this: In May, I spent 17 days on the Italian
    Peninsula (a geographic entity). Of those 17 days, only two whole days
    and parts of two others were spent in "Italy" (a geopolitical
    entity). I could have left the Italian peninsula and remained in Italy
    (by going to either Sicilia or Sardegna), but I did just the opposite
    - I remained on the Italian peninsula but left Italy.

    I would strongly recommend that you follow Alexander Pope's sage
    advice: A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep, or taste
    not the Pierian spring.
     
    Max Quordlepleen, Aug 7, 2003
    #19
  20. slumpy

    Brian H¹© Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    Max Quordlepleen said:
    A part of yes, but not *in* those countries.
    As I had stated earleir in the thread, there is a difference between being part
    of something and being in it.
    An island off the coast of a country is not *in* that country.
    My latest attempt is to put Bullis right on a couple of points.
    1. European is not a nationality, my arguement was that I am English (British)
    but not European.
    2. Bullis thinks that being in the common market is the same thing as being
    European.
    I'm afraid that in this case, it is you who seems to be splitting hairs, being a
    member of a club, or being in a club, or being a part of a club, doesn't equate
    to being in the club house, or in/on the clubs grounds.
    How can something be *in* something when it is next to it?
    If I have a bottle and a glass, and both contain milk that comes from that
    bottle, the milk in the glass is not in the bottle, but it is part of the milk
    that is in the bottle.
    The fact that it is in the glass next to the bottle is evidenve that it is not
    *in* the bottle.
    A peninsula is still part of a mainland. An island is entireley surrounded by
    water 24/7 365/365.
     
    Brian H¹©, Aug 7, 2003
    #20
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