removing brake fluid from a tshirt

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Brian, Feb 13, 2006.

  1. Brian

    Brian Guest

    I have alot of little dots of brake fluid on a white tshirt, caused from a
    leak on my motorcycle's brake line and the little drips being blown on my
    arm and shirt and I rode. What can I do, if anything, to get the shirt white
    again? I washed it once (and dried it) in the load last night with
    everything else and assumed it would wash off, but went to wear it today and
    saw the dots still on it. I washed it again this time rubbing in the SHOUT
    stain remover before, but it didn't get them out. It's not a 100% shirt, it
    has some screen/print on the back.

    What is the best chance to get the shirt white again? A color-safe bleach?
    Anyone have a solution for this one?

    Aloha
     
    Brian, Feb 13, 2006
    #1
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  2. I recently tried the following one from Heloise on a number of whites.
    I was amazed. I soaked them as is recommended here and then washed
    them as usual.

    Stain Remover from Heloise's mom

    Here is my mother's last-ditch stain remover for washable whites and
    colored items that can be bleached (or that you're willing to take a
    chance on): To 1 gallon of hot water, add 1 cup of powdered dishwasher
    detergent and 1/2 cup of bleach. Let the garment soak for no longer
    than 30 minutes. If the stain doesn't come out in that amount of time,
    it probably never will.


    --
    Grandpa Chuck
    -ô¿ô-
    ~

    The following information is given with the utmost respect
    for the armed forces and civilians who have died in the
    current war in Iraq. According to http://icasualties.org/oif/
    The number of Americans killed in Iraq as of Feb. 09, 2006 is 2,267.
    United Kingdom = 101
    Other = 103
    Iraqi deaths in excess of 30,000 - probably many more.

    Today, February 13, 2006
    It has been 1018 days since Bush declared,
    "Mission Accomplished in Iraq."
     
    Grandpa Chuck, Feb 13, 2006
    #2
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  3. Brian

    Gordon Guest

    Must be a Japcrap rider then.....
     
    Gordon, Feb 13, 2006
    #3
  4. Brian

    Leythos Guest

    In general, once you DRY a shirt with heat you SET the stain.
     
    Leythos, Feb 13, 2006
    #4
  5. Brian

    Special Ed Guest


    As opposed to, say, an over priced, under-engineered Piggy ?
     
    Special Ed, Feb 14, 2006
    #5
  6. That is what I thought too until I used the solution that I posted on
    a shirt that I was ready to throw in the trash. I figured if it didn't
    work I hadn't lost anything. It came out brilliantly bright.

    --
    Grandpa Chuck
    -ô¿ô-
    ~

    The following information is given with the utmost respect
    for the armed forces and civilians who have died in the
    current war in Iraq. According to http://icasualties.org/oif/
    The number of Americans killed in Iraq as of Feb. 09, 2006 is 2,267.
    United Kingdom = 101
    Other = 103
    Iraqi deaths in excess of 30,000 - probably many more.

    Today, February 13, 2006
    It has been 1018 days since Bush declared,
    "Mission Accomplished in Iraq."
     
    Grandpa Chuck, Feb 14, 2006
    #6
  7. Brian

    Plato Guest

    I'd leave it be. Sort of a testament to riding. Hope for more stains.
     
    Plato, Feb 14, 2006
    #7
  8. Brian

    Scraggy Guest

    1. Decent bike.
    2.Angle Grinder
    http://www.target.com/gp/detail.htm...GCTU|4_1/2_Angle_Grinder&ref=tgt_adv_XSC10001
     
    Scraggy, Feb 14, 2006
    #8
  9. Brian

    Vanguard Guest


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brake_fluid

    Brake fluid is an alcohol-based hydraulic fluid but may contain additives,
    like glycol esters and oils. Used brake fluid may also contain benzene,
    lead, and other heavy metals.

    Hmm, I wonder how brake cleaner spray might work since it removes brake
    fluid, highly evaporative, and a degreaser. Or toluene. Or acetone.
    Presumably the T-shirt is cotton and not synthetic. I haven't seen my
    clothes disintegrate from being hit with brake cleaner spray (but I have
    seen bleach degenerate the fibers). If it's safe to clean my hands, must be
    safe for a cotton T-shirt, too (but I don't know if the T-shirt is colored
    and with what kind of dye, but the OP did say it was white).

    I have to wonder what is so special about a plain white T-shirt that the OP
    has to waste time cleaning it rather than buy another one (after fixing the
    leaking brake line since it probably isn't just his T-shirt that is getting
    stained). The brake cleaner spray will probably cost as much, or more, than
    for one new plain white T-shirt.
     
    Vanguard, Feb 14, 2006
    #9
  10. Brian

    Box134 Guest

    I once got used oil out of a shirt by repeatedly hand washing the spots with
    a stain remover and Sunlight soap. Sunlight is bar soap meant mostly for the
    laundry. I think it's universal.

    Put stain remover on the spots, let them soak for a while. Wet and apply
    Sunlight soap. Use your hands to work the soap into the fabric. Rinse
    thoroughly. If you are making progress the spots will be lighter. Repeat
    until they are gone. It could take 3 or 4 applications.
     
    Box134, Feb 15, 2006
    #10
  11. Brian

    Frosty Guest

    What trick, what device, what starting-hole on Mon, 13 Feb 2006
    23:05:32 GMT, canst thou now find out, to hide "Brian"
    Two words: Tie dye
     
    Frosty, Feb 16, 2006
    #11
  12. Brian

    Ribich Guest

    Is this your favourite shirt? If your bike has a hydraulic clutch you could
    try to get the clutch line to leak and thereby have matching stains on both
    sides of your shirt.

    Just putting in my $0.02
     
    Ribich, Feb 16, 2006
    #12
  13. Brian

    Jim Guest

    Failing all else you could always substitute clutch fluid for conditioner,
    this should give a all over colour match?
     
    Jim, Feb 17, 2006
    #13
  14. Brian

    Shelia Murray

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Use a hand cleaned cleaner like gojoe and baking soda even after you have dried it in the dryer!!! Then a a cup of baking soda to washer to get rid of any smells left behind!!
     
    Shelia Murray, Sep 15, 2017
    #14
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