Refus de sentence

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Jaypie, Jan 11, 2006.

  1. Jaypie

    Jaypie Guest

    Je dis un gros BRAVO au juge Beauchemin de Sherbrooke qui refuse d'imposer
    des sentences avec sursis, c'est-à-dire à purger dans la société...tant que
    le gouvernement fera des coupures.

    Si tous les juges mettaient leurs culottes comme lui, du changement
    s'opérerait au sein du Ministère de la Justice.

    Pas besoin d'indépendance ni de souveraineté pour ça.

    Jaypie
     
    Jaypie, Jan 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jaypie

    Evan Platt Guest

    French Translation:
    I say a large CHEER to judge Beauchemin de Sherbrooke who refuses to
    impose sentences with deferment, i.e. to purge in the company... as
    long as the government will make cuts. If all the judges put their
    breeches like him, of the change would take place within the Ministry
    for Justice. Not need for independence nor of sovereignty for that.
    Jaypie

    Whatever the hell that means.
     
    Evan Platt, Jan 11, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jaypie

    Rob K Guest

    Evan Platt wrote:


    It's about conditional sentencing and sentences where certain "services to
    the community" have to be performed , instead of doing time in jail.
    "purger des sentences dans la societe" is something like serving your
    sentence in society, as opposed to in jail. "Mettre les culottes" is
    something like being firm.

    http://www.madd.ca/francais/news/p041116bg2-f.htm
     
    Rob K, Jan 11, 2006
    #3
  4. Looks like that might translate to "wear the trousers", as we hen-pecked
    chaps like to say here in the UK.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Brian_H=B9=A9?=, Jan 11, 2006
    #4
  5. Jaypie

    Rob K Guest

    Brian H¹© wrote:

    Thanks Brian - so if "you chaps" wear trousers you've straightened your
    back ? Which inevitably raises the question, what if you chaps do not wear
    trousers ... I think I don't want to know. :)

    Seriously, I've been thinking about a more accurate translation.
    Any ideas ?
     
    Rob K, Jan 11, 2006
    #5
  6. Isn't the culotte in this context an apparatus that is fitted to a
    prisoner, along the line of the stocks used to hold people in town
    squares so others could throw rotten tomatoes at them?

    As for my little contribution, that was only meant as a joke, as the
    French equivalent would be porter les (des?) culottes.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Brian_H=B9=A9?=, Jan 11, 2006
    #6
  7. Jaypie

    Rob K Guest

    Brian H¹© wrote:


    No, I don't think so.
    OP:(...) ...tant que le gouvernement fera des coupures.

    (so that the "le gouvernement" can cut on spending; less jail-time.)

    Si tous les juges mettaient leurs culottes comme lui, (...)

    FWIW, I read it as the judge refusing to go along with that scheme. He has
    "put on his trousers" meaning "I won't allow it" or something similar.

    What you mean is this:
    http://tinyurl.com/7k969

    I think the judge wants "le gouvernement" to be in the "culotte".
     
    Rob K, Jan 11, 2006
    #7
  8. Ah, I'm with you now, (at least, I'm catching up).
    The nearest expression I can think of would be "tune your violin".
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Brian_H=B9=A9?=, Jan 11, 2006
    #8
  9. Jaypie

    Bob K Guest

    In Quebec "culottes" is used for pants,

    Bob K

     
    Bob K, Jan 11, 2006
    #9
  10. Whatever floats your boats.
    :p
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Brian_H=B9=A9?=, Jan 11, 2006
    #10
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