Question regarding panoramas/photostitch

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Guest, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Guest

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    hi, i have a canon sd400, i've taken a couple panorama shots and pieced
    them together using photostitch 3.1 that came with my camera..
    everything works great except most of the time, there's distortion
    along the seam which is clearly visible when zoomed in.. its like a
    stutter in the picture.. is there anyway to fix this or avoid this? is
    there a better piece of software i should be using? thanks
     
    Guest, Mar 20, 2006
    #1
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  2. I've had good results with Panorama Factory in essentially full auto mode.

    There are lots of options, and lots of resources out there. Here's one.

    http://www.panoguide.com/

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Mar 20, 2006
    #2
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  3. wrote:
    : hi, i have a canon sd400, i've taken a couple panorama shots and pieced
    : them together using photostitch 3.1 that came with my camera..
    : everything works great except most of the time, there's distortion
    : along the seam which is clearly visible when zoomed in.. its like a
    : stutter in the picture.. is there anyway to fix this or avoid this? is
    : there a better piece of software i should be using? thanks

    Some stitching software is better than others at working the joins. So you
    might want to try other stitching software. My current favorite is
    Autostitch (which BTW is free). It does a very good job of matching
    everything up automatically. One other reason that joins can have some
    distortion is if you are on too wide a focal length. The original image
    has a paralax error and the two edges that join will in turn have that
    problem. Thus a straight horizon my have a wave to it over several joined
    images. Some software is able to adjust for this focal length error but I
    am not happy with the ones I have tried as they seem to rely on the focal
    length stored with the image file and so you can not work a large image in
    multiple smaller parts that will then be joined together later. The way I
    avoid this is I try to shoot my panos with a focal length that is "normal"
    to my camera. This would be a 35mm equivalent 50mm lens. With my camera
    that means I want to use aproximately a 33mm lens length. This would
    reduce the paralax error right at the beginning.

    Good luck

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Mar 20, 2006
    #3
  4. Guest

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Google for photostitching software. Be ready for a pretty steep
    learning curve for most of them, and many seem to have user interfaces
    designed by sadists, but they can produce some stunning panoramas, even
    from casual pictures. If you want something pretty simple to use, try
    the feature in PSE4.
     
    Ron Hunter, Mar 20, 2006
    #4
  5. Give the autostitch demo a try. One of the best matching algorithms out
    there. Use manual exposure if possible or exposure lock and be careful not
    to tilt the camera out of vertical, ie top/bottom in/out.

    http://www.autostitch.net
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Mar 20, 2006
    #5
  6. Guest

    John Smith Guest

    I use PanaVue.. great program, as easy or advanced as you want it to be. But
    you should make your own "pan head" for first class results.
     
    John Smith, Mar 20, 2006
    #6
  7. Guest

    Scott W Guest

    PTGui works very well, there is a free demo version to try.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Mar 20, 2006
    #7
  8. Guest

    Guest

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    cool i'll check it out.. i'm just a point and shoot type guy, i have a
    canon sd400.. when i'm outside on a sunny day i keep it on auto and
    thats that.. here's an example of what i mean, the two seams are
    obvious, ideally i'd like to get rid of that discoloration in the sky
    but what really bugs me is if you zoom in on the seams, you'll see that
    blurred stutter i'm talking about.. i tried panorama factory on auto
    and that was even worse..

    http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e277/stebed/panroama.jpg
     
    Guest, Mar 20, 2006
    #8
  9. Guest

    Joe Petolino Guest

    One application that no one has mentioned yet is Hugin:

    http://hugin.sourceforge.net/

    It's one of the few good stitchers that runs on OS-X and Linux as well
    on as Windows. Like PTGui, it's a front end for the freeware Panorama
    Tools, but unlike PTGui, it's open-source free software. And I think
    it has a better user interface than PTGui. But it will still take
    you some time to learn how to use it.
    With Panorama Tools based stitchers it's not necessary to keep the camera
    vertically level. The software will warp your images to fit whichever
    projection you choose for the output. A pano head, or even a tripod,
    are not necessary for distant landscapes. But exposure lock and
    white-balance lock *are* always important.

    Here are a couple of mine, stitched with Hugin OS-X:

    http://www.pbase.com/petolino/image/52262356
    http://www.pbase.com/petolino/image/52262404

    And here's an untrimmed one which shows how well it can stitch a
    poorly-aligned set of handheld shots:

    http://www.pbase.com/petolino/image/53330885

    In that last one, I didn't lock either exposure or white balance,
    so the colors don't match very well.

    -Joe
     
    Joe Petolino, Mar 20, 2006
    #9
  10. Guest

    Guest

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    Guest, Mar 20, 2006
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  11. Guest

    Guest

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    thanks guys, autostitch is perfect!
     
    Guest, Mar 20, 2006
    #11
  12. Guest

    Alfred Molon Guest

    You are confusing a few things. First of all the wide focal length does
    not matter and it is possible to obtain seamless stitches even from
    images taken with a fisheye lens.

    The parallax error occurs when you don't rotate the camera around the
    nodal point and is most visible when parts of the image are near to you.
     
    Alfred Molon, Mar 20, 2006
    #12
  13. Guest

    Ron Hunter Guest

    You might try correcting the white balance on each photo before sending
    them to the stitcher. This should help the picture you gave as an example.
     
    Ron Hunter, Mar 21, 2006
    #13
  14. Guest

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Ron Hunter, Mar 21, 2006
    #14
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